November 15, 2018
ROS Robot Parameter Naming Convention REP for review

@tfoote wrote:

Thanks to the work of @k-okada there is a draft REP for formalizing robot parameter naming conventions.

To that end please take a look a the proposed draft. If you have any comments please comment on the pull request. If you like what you see and don’t have any comment please use the review mechanism and approve the PR. (Click on Files changed then Review Changes drop down -> Approve.)

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by @tfoote Tully Foote on November 15, 2018 02:04 AM

November 14, 2018
ROS turns 11 & ROSCon 2019!

@gerkey wrote:

We’re happy to celebrate the 11th anniversary of ROS!

Last week in 2007 the first commit was made to ROS at its original home on SourceForge.

Since our last anniversary, the ROS community has continued to expand and thrive. As documented in our latest report, we’re seeing double-digit annual percentage increases in almost every metric that we track. In July 2018 alone we saw 16M binary packages downloaded from packages.ros.org by 328K unique IP addresses (those figures don’t include downloads from mirrors around the world, of which there are at least eleven).

We also saw two great ROS developers’ conferences this year, starting in mid-September with ROSCon JP 2018 in Tokyo. It was the first local edition of ROSCon, designed specifically for the local developer community and held in the local language. The event was a great success, selling out in advance with a final attendance total of 189 people and supported by 18 sponsoring organizations. We’re expecting to see more local editions of ROSCon in the future. Later in September ROSCon 2018 happened in Madrid. Our fourth sold-out year in a row, ROSCon 2018 broke many records with 510 attendees (including 27 diversity scholars from 19 countries across 6 continents) and 47 sponsors.

On the topic of ROSCon, we’re happy to make the following announcement:

Save the date: ROSCon 2019 will be held October 31 - November 1, 2019 at the Conrad Macao, Cotai Central. IROS 2019 will be held at the nearby Venetian Macao November 3-8, so plan to attend both of these great events in Macau!

Stay tuned for more information on ROSCon 2019.

If you have questions about participating in or sponsoring ROSCon 2019, please contact the organizing committee: roscon-2019-oc@openrobotics.org.

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by @gerkey gerkey on November 14, 2018 09:34 PM

November 13, 2018
Major Updates of Udemy ROS for Beginners: Basics, Motion and OpenCV

@Anis_Koubaa wrote:

Hello

I would like to announce that my Udemy course entitled

ROS for Beginners: Basics, Motion and OpenCV

have been subject to several major updates since its release when initially the content was only covering three hours of ROS tutorials, and now 10 hours of ROS tutorials.
The course covers many aspects including, Installation, ROS Ecosystem, ROS Topics, ROS Services, Motion in ROS with application to Turtlebot, Computer Vision with OpenCV including ball tracking lectures and project, laser scanner, rosserial Arduino, network configuration, launch files and much more.

The course contains many programming assignments and practical projects to apply the knowledge learned in lectures for every topic.
It is a Best Seller in the Robotics category.

To Enroll to the course, please use the following link
https://www.udemy.com/ros-essentials/?couponCode=ROSDISCOURSE1

I am currently working on preparing Part II of this course which will be released on Jan 2019.

Anis

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by @Anis_Koubaa Anis Koubaa on November 13, 2018 11:08 AM

New Packages for Kinetic 2018-11-12

@tfoote wrote:

We’re happy to announce the release of 5 new packages and 80 updated packages into Kinetic.

Thank you to all the maintainers and contributors who have helped make this possible. Your efforts are appreciated by the entire community!

Package Updates for kinetic

Added Packages [5]:

Updated Packages [80]:

Removed Packages [0]:

Thanks to all ROS maintainers who make packages available to the ROS community. The above list of packages was made possible by the work of the following maintainers:

  • Ioan Sucan
  • Kei Okada
  • Kevin Hallenbeck
  • Koji Terada
  • Kris Kozak
  • Lennart Puck
  • Marc Alban
  • Masaru Morita
  • Max Schwarz
  • Micho Radovnikovich
  • P. J. Reed
  • Pilz GmbH and Co. KG
  • Robert Haschke
  • Ryohei Ueda
  • Tully Foote
  • Vincent Rabaud
  • Yohei Kakiuchi
  • YoheiKakiuchi
  • Youhei Kakiuchi
  • Yusuke Furuta
  • furuta
  • jordan

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by @tfoote Tully Foote on November 13, 2018 04:31 AM

New Packages for Indigo 2018-11-12

@tfoote wrote:

We’re happy to announce 95 updated packages for ROS Indigo. Full details are below.

Thank you to all the maintainers and contributors who help make these packages available to the community!

Package Updates for indigo

Added Packages [0]:

Updated Packages [95]:

Removed Packages [0]:

Thanks to all ROS maintainers who make packages available to the ROS community. The above list of packages was made possible by the work of the following maintainers:

  • Dave Coleman
  • Ioan Sucan
  • Isaac I. Y. Saito
  • Jon Binney
  • Kei Okada
  • Kevin Hallenbeck
  • Koji Terada
  • Kris Kozak
  • Marc Alban
  • Mathias Lüdtke
  • Michael Ferguson
  • Michael Görner
  • Micho Radovnikovich
  • MoveIt Setup Assistant
  • P. J. Reed
  • Ryohei Ueda
  • Siddhartha Banerjee
  • Tully Foote
  • Vincent Rabaud
  • Yohei Kakiuchi
  • YoheiKakiuchi
  • Youhei Kakiuchi
  • Yusuke Furuta
  • furuta

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by @tfoote Tully Foote on November 13, 2018 01:51 AM

November 12, 2018
Swift implementation of ROS client

@tgu wrote:

I have uploaded a preliminary Swift implementation of the client library at GItHub https://github.com/tgu/RosSwift

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by @tgu Thomas Gustafsson on November 12, 2018 07:58 PM

18th 16-hour Marathon ROS Seminar and Hackathon using ROS

@Pyo wrote:


(The 18th 16-hour Marathon ROS Seminar)

[The 18th 16-hour Marathon ROS Seminar]

The 18th ‘16-hour Marathon ROS Seminar’ in Korea has held on 3 and 4 November 2018 at Seoul. More than 110 engineers and students participated in this seminar that was organized by ROBOTIS.

This seminar is composed of various basic ROS lectures for ROS beginners. This seminar was held in seven cities in Korea, starting from 2015 and has been held 18 times so far. Since the beginning of this seminar, over 2,000 engineers and students have been involved.

We starting with the installation of ROS and learning about the introduction, features, and tools. We then learned the concept of ROS based robot programming and tried various ROS development tools. Then we practiced SLAM, Navigation, and Manipulation using ROS, TurtleBot3, OpenManipulator on the Gazebo simulator. For the celebration of the 11th anniversary of ROS, we went over the ROS history and talked about future ROS development. Finally, we start with a comparison of ROS1 and ROS2, learn about the powerful features of ROS2, and discuss how it can be easily transferred from ROS1 to ROS2.

It was a truly grateful experience that we were able to share a wonderful time talking about ROS with about 110 people in this seminar.


(2nd Hackathon using ROS)

[2nd Hackathon using ROS]

We hosted Hackathon on the topic ‘Manipulator for Service Robot’. This Hackathon has held on 9 and 10 November, last week. This event was attended by about 30 people and did not sleep for 30 hours and performed the ROS-based manipulator programming project. :night_with_stars: :sunny:

I look forward to various ROS seminars and Hackathon going on in the world in the future. :slight_smile:

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by @Pyo Yoonseok Pyo on November 12, 2018 04:11 AM

November 09, 2018
Announcement: Update for Google's Dialogflow-v2 and Speech-To-Text API for ROS

@piraka9011 wrote:

Hi everyone,

Last year I wrote a package for Google’s STT API and NLP platform Dialogflow. The package worked well but had two issues:

  1. It required you to use Google’s STT API to get text and then send it to Dialogflow.
  2. It can only be run locally.

With this updated package you can:

  1. Send audio directly to Dialogflow through your mic.
  2. Send/receive audio through a server that you can run on another computer/robot on your network so that you don’t have to run everything on one machine.
  3. Exposed access to contexts, intents, query text, confidence, and cleaner message format.

There is no need to ROS-ify the Google STT API anymore since Dialogflow does most of the work. However, if you’re interested in using the beta/ML features for more fine tuned speech recognition, then I left a script that can be used if you’re interested.

Documentation can be found here: https://wiki.ros.org/dialogflow_ros
Repo here: https://github.com/piraka9011/dialogflow_ros

The installation instructions are the same and there is an install.sh script you can run which takes care of most of the work, except for setting up your Google credentials (instructions in docs).

Again, I’d love to get some feedback on how to enhance this and what features to add.

Best,
Anas

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by @piraka9011 Anas Abou Allaban on November 09, 2018 11:15 PM

ROSIN: submission deadline for proposals coming up (November 16)

@ThiloZimmermann wrote:

The EU H2020 ROSIN project has the goal to advance open-source robot software for industry and the robotics community as a whole. One of the main activities of the project is a grant program with a total amount of 3+ Million EUR for Focused Technical Projects (FTPs) on ROS software development.

Have a good idea for a ROS/ROS-Industrial related project? Want to work on ROS(-I) software components, documentation, standardisation or a related topic?

If you or your company are located within the European Union, then submit an FTP proposal and apply for a ROSIN grant by following the steps outlined in the applicants guide.

FTP proposals may be submitted all year long but are evaluated every three months.

The next cut-off date is: November 16, 2018 . That is in about one week.

Proposals are short (a few pages) and concise. Applicants are guided through the process by an application wizard and a guide is provided.

To submit your FTP, please visit rosin-project.eu/ftps.

If you have any questions about the process, whether your idea or project would qualify, send me or one of my colleagues a message either through ROS Discourse or by email (see the Contact page on the site for addresses). For 2019, we are planning with 4 more cut-off dates, exact timing is still being discussed (e.g. to not interfere with major robotics conference deadlines and alike).

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by @ThiloZimmermann Thilo Zimmermann on November 09, 2018 10:10 AM

November 07, 2018
TALOS humanoid joins the RoboHub family at University of Waterloo!

Last week, the University of Waterloo inaugurated the E7 Engineering building, which has an impressive RoboHub with a big family of robots… Amongst which, you can find TALOS! The 32-DoF humanoid robot has joined the RoboHub family, and showed its manipulation skills during the Grand Opening. We had the opportunity to speak with Professor Kulic and Professor Melek about their plans for TALOS at RoboHub, as well as with the RoboHub Manager, Brandon DeHart. Here are some of the questions they answered:

What is the goal of the Waterloo RoboHub?

TALOS-humanoid-robot-robohub-waterloo-university

Credits: RoboHub, University of Waterloo.

“Enabling a broad range of robotics research, focusing particularly on extensive experimental validation of realistic scenarios. The goal is to support both fundamental and applied research on robot control and planning, heterogeneous robot platforms, multi-robot collaboration, human-robot interaction, and robust autonomy across different applications including manufacturing, automation, health, and service.

This will be achieved in three ways: developing research leadership in robotics and intelligent systems; building capacity to enable researchers working on different areas of robotics to work in parallel; and establishing a unique facility to study the design and deployment of robots and robot teams across these and other application areas.”

How will TALOS contribute to the RoboHub?

“The TALOS will be one of our key experimental platforms supporting research in control and planning, industrial automation, and human-robot interaction. As the first platform of its kind in Canada, the TALOS is an excellent and agile platform for conducting groundbreaking research in human-robot interaction, advanced motion planning, and the integration of humanoid robots with other machines in human-centric environments.”

What kind of research will you conduct with TALOS?

“The TALOS will be used to experimentally validate both fundamental and applied research. Research programs to be supported by the TALOS include work on control and gait synthesis, grasp and bimanual manipulation planning, human-robot interaction, and machine learning. The robot’s agility and large number of degrees of freedom will also enable advanced research in modeling, motion planning, control and navigation of high DoF human-like robotic systems in semi-structured and unstructured environments.”

What aspects made you decide you wanted to have that humanoid platform at RoboHub?

humanoid-robot-waterloo-university-engineering-TALOS

Credits: RoboHub, University of Waterloo.

“The TALOS is a powerful and versatile experimental platform that can support not just the broad range of projects we already have in mind for the RoboHub, but also a broad set of future work. The ability to implement both position and torque control supports both fundamental and applied research, and provides a platform that can be used for interaction with the environment. The integration with ROS also helps facilitate integration with the other platforms in the RoboHub to support research on heterogeneous robot teams.”

Finally, which are the next steps needed to integrate robots into our lives, and how does RoboHub plan to contribute to that process?

“Augmenting robotic platforms (e.g., the wheeled, legged, flying, and magnetically levitated systems we have in the RoboHub) with advanced algorithms which incorporate machine learning and other AI methods for efficient situation awareness, assessment of human cognitive workload, understanding human intent and effective planning and control to work collaboratively in human-centric environments.

Also, using the above capabilities to enable humans to better understand robots behavior in order to gain more confidence in automation and the AI which powers these intelligent robotic systems. Thanks in part to TALOS and the other advanced systems we have here, the RoboHub has the capacity and the researchers here have the experience to make significant contributions to this entire technology chain.”

 

Many thanks to the Professors and to the RoboHub Manager for sharing their plans for TALOS at the University of Waterloo. We look forward to seeing this humanoid robot in action at RoboHub! If you’d like to learn more about TALOS, find extended information here. You can also follow up the Waterloo RoboHub’s latest news on their amazing work through their webpage or by following their social networks (such as Twitter or Instagram)!

Credits of all pictures: RoboHub, Waterloo Engineering, University of Waterloo.

The post TALOS humanoid joins the RoboHub family at University of Waterloo! appeared first on PAL Robotics Blog.

by Judith Viladomat on November 07, 2018 03:49 PM

November 06, 2018
Inspexel - The swiss army knife for dynamixel servo motors

@sgssgene wrote:

Inspexel

The swiss army knife for dynamixel servo motors

We developed a new command line tool called inspexel (inspector dynamixel).
It has a support for dynamixel motors (MX, MX(2), X, Pro, AX) and can use protocol version 1 and 2 for communication.

Detect motors

A single command will detect motors on the bus reads all their registers: inspexel detect --read_all.
It gives a nice overview over their state and how they deviate from the default value.

Map motors into filesystem

Another function, which can be used for scripting or just exploring a motors functionality is the fuse option. Calling inspexel fuse will map every register of the detected motors into the linux file system.
You can list all available motors with

  ls dynamixelFS/motors

To read a single register you can call

cat dynamixelFS/motors/0/register-by-name/Present\ Temperature

To set values to register

echo 60 > dynamixelFS/motors/0/register-by-name/Temperature\ Shutdown

Motivation

This tools purpose is to have a command line tool to configure dynamixel motors. Dynamixel motors are being used in many robotic projects but it seems like some tooling around the is missing.
There exists the robotis tool RoboManager which only runs under Windows. There are also other projects like Mixcell (https://github.com/clebercoutof/mixcell) which brings some of the functionality to linux.
One big issues with these tools are that they have GUI which makes it hard to use them over ssh on remote computers. Also it is not possible to use them inside of scripts.

Source

The Project is an open source software and can be found at https://github.com/gottliebtfreitag/inspexel/

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by @sgssgene on November 06, 2018 11:32 PM

November 02, 2018
Commercial Medical Carrying Robot

@droter wrote:

Hi,

Does anyone know of a commercial company that is selling medical material handling robots? Looking for companies that are selling medical robots in New York City.

Thanks in advance,

Matt

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by @droter Droter on November 02, 2018 05:31 PM

October 30, 2018
New Packages for Kinetic 2018-10-30

@tfoote wrote:

We’re happy to announce 16 new packages and 73 updated packages for Kinetic.

Of note there’s a rollback of ros-kinetic-leap-motion from 0.0.14 to 0.0.11. This rollback was due to the new version not building on most platforms. However it did build on xenial amd64 and as such if you’ve already installed 0.0.14 if you want to downgrade you will need to manually uninstall 0.0.14 and then reinstall the package. All other platforms the 0.0.14 package did not propagate and so is not an issue.

Thank you to the many maintainers and contributors who have helped make this changes available to the community!

Details are below:

Package Updates for kinetic

Added Packages [16]:

Updated Packages [73]:

Removed Packages [0]:

Thanks to all ROS maintainers who make packages available to the ROS community. The above list of packages was made possible by the work of the following maintainers:

  • Austin Hendrix
  • Chittaranjan Srinivas Swaminathan
  • Christian Arndt
  • Dave Coleman
  • Edmond DuPont
  • Felix Ruess
  • Florian Lier
  • Ioan Sucan
  • Isaac I. Y. Saito
  • Jim Vaughan
  • Jon Binney
  • Josh Whitley
  • Kevin Hallenbeck
  • Kris Kozak
  • Marc Alban
  • Masaya Kataoka
  • Mathias Lüdtke
  • Matthew Bries
  • Michael Ferguson
  • Michael Görner
  • Monika Florek-Jasinska
  • P. J. Reed
  • Russell Toris
  • Tom Moore

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by @tfoote Tully Foote on October 30, 2018 08:04 AM

October 29, 2018
RFC on REP 153: rosdistro index format 4

@dirk-thomas wrote:

Almost four years have passed since the rosdistro file format has been last updated in REP 143. The latest REP draft aims to add a small piece of additional information to the index.yaml file. For each ROS distribution the major ROS version should be annotated, e.g. for ROS Melodic that would be 1 and for ROS Bouncy that would be 2. Currently that information is not available anywhere and therefore hardcoded in various places. Please see the current draft of the REP for the fairly small addition.

While the change is small it still requires a bump of the index file format from version 3 to version 4. That will ensure that once the rosdistro repository is being updated to include this information that users which are still using an “older” version of the Python rosdisto package will get a meaningful error message guiding them to update the rosdistro Python package.

After the REP has been rolled out and the rosdistro repository has been updated to annotate the ROS distribution we will be able to consolidate the forked ROS 2 rosdistro repository into the upstream one. This will make releasing ROS 2 repositories as simple as it is for ROS 1 - without the need for a custom environment variable.

Please provide your feedback on the REP pull request. (Please do not reply in this discourse thread since the audience is very big and not everyone might be interested in the in-depth discussion of this topic.)

Your friendly ROS team

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by @dirk-thomas Dirk Thomas on October 29, 2018 07:54 PM

New Packages for Indigo 2018-10-29

@tfoote wrote:

We’re happy to announce 11 new packages ad 42 updated packages for Indigo.

Thank you to all the maintainers and contributors who have helped make this possible. Full details are below.

Package Updates for indigo

Added Packages [11]:

  • ros-indigo-libqt-concurrent: 0.0.2-0
  • ros-indigo-libqt-core: 0.0.2-0
  • ros-indigo-libqt-dev: 0.0.2-0
  • ros-indigo-libqt-gui: 0.0.2-0
  • ros-indigo-libqt-network: 0.0.2-0
  • ros-indigo-libqt-opengl: 0.0.2-0
  • ros-indigo-libqt-opengl-dev: 0.0.2-0
  • ros-indigo-libqt-svg-dev: 0.0.2-0
  • ros-indigo-libqt-widgets: 0.0.2-0
  • ros-indigo-qt-qmake: 0.0.2-0
  • ros-indigo-rc-hand-eye-calibration-client: 2.4.2-0

Updated Packages [42]:

Removed Packages [0]:

Thanks to all ROS maintainers who make packages available to the ROS community. The above list of packages was made possible by the work of the following maintainers:

  • Austin Hendrix
  • Edmond DuPont
  • Felix Ruess
  • Isaac I. Y. Saito
  • Josh Whitley
  • Kevin Hallenbeck
  • Kris Kozak
  • Marc Alban
  • Matthew Bries
  • Michael Ferguson
  • Monika Florek-Jasinska
  • P. J. Reed

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by @tfoote Tully Foote on October 29, 2018 07:35 PM

TIAGo robot multitasking at the IROS Mobile Manipulation Hackathon

One TIAGo robot, six teams, and 24 hours: the IROS 2018 Mobile Manipulation Hackathon (MMH) was exciting and challenging at the same time, and gathered a lot of attention! Every afternoon two of the six selected teams showed all they could program into the TIAGo robot in record time. The results are impressive: TIAGo robot became a waiter, a shop clerk restocking products, could feed people and tidy a table.

TAMS Team and Robotics.SG Team tied for the first place and both won this IROS 2018 MMH edition – congratulations! And thanks to all the participants for the hard work and passion shown while participating. Discover each team’s achievements here:

 

TIAGo the Bartender [Winner!]

TAMS Team (Hamburg University)

MMH-TAMS-V-Hackathon-Robotics-mobile-manipulationTAMS Team turned TIAGo robot into a waiter serving at a very special bar. The mobile manipulator Bartender could understand which was the customer’s desired drink when he pointed at the menu, and after that, it found it in the shelf, picked it, and could successfully pour some drink on the customer’s glass!

Watch the full demo hereThe TAMS Team also published all their demo software on GitHub! Find the main repository with documentation and rosinstall files here.

TIAGo: The “Konbini” Re-Shelver [Winner!]

Robotics.SG Team (Team Nanyang (NTU), Panasonic R&D Centre Singapore, Hand Plus Robotics, and Panasonic Connected Solutions Company)

Hackathon-tiago-robot-robotics.sg-pal-mobile-manipulationRobotics.SG Team customized their TIAGo robot with a tray attached on its base and programmed it to restock misplaced products in a convenience store. TIAGo loaded a tray with the misplaced products and recognized each product, picked it and placed it in the correct rack. The idea came up due to their concern of a future in which the aging population will lead to a human resources shortage. Robots can become a helping hand to overcome such a challenge.

Watch the full demo here.

TIAGo picking hard to grasp cutlery

Homer Team (Koblenz University)

Hackathon-tiago-robot-robotics.sg-pal-mobile-manipulationThe TIAGo robot from Homer Team had the mission of tidying a table full of hard to grasp cutlery. It was able to pick a spoon, navigate to another area and autonomously place it into a bowl a couple of times – even when the jury challenged the team by asking to move the position of the table. They enabled TIAGo to feel the table comparing the current consumption of the arm with the accurate prediction provided by the dynamic model and the current sensors in the joints.

Watch the full demo here or read the team’s impressions on Homer Team’s Blog.

Using TIAGo for Adaptive Robotic Feeding Assistance

IRI Team (UPC-CSIC)

Hackathon-tiago-robot-robotics.sg-pal-mobile-manipulationThe IRI TIAGo robot focused on an assisted living task which consisted of aiding a person to eat. They customized their TIAGo robot with a 3D printed piece that enabled the robot to comfortably carry a dish full of food. After placing it on the table, TIAGo got a spoon and could feed the person. A camera added to the gripper recognized if the person had the intention to eat detecting if the mouth was open, and only then TIAGo delivered the food.

Watch the full demo here.

Enhancing TIAGo robot capabilities to get on in clutter and messy human environments

Hackathon-tiago-robot-robotics.sg-pal-mobile-manipulation

AUDECO-IOC-UPC Team

AUDECO-IOC-UPC Team’s demonstration consisted too on having TIAGo robot serving some drinks at a bar. They properly dressed their TIAGo in an apron and a bow tie and plugged their customized robotic hand as the end-effector for their demonstration.

Watch the full demo here.

Dexterous Liquid Pouring in a Domestic Situation

Hackathon-tiago-robot-robotics.sg-pal-mobile-manipulation

PMM Tohoku Team (Tohoku University)

The Japanese team aimed to prepare TIAGo robot to grab and serve a drink in a domestic environment. The robot had to detect and distinguish the drinks placed on a shelf, pick a bottle from it, bring it to a table and serve the drink by pouring the liquid into a glass.

 

Many thanks to the Judges, Sponsors, and Organizers, to make the Mobile Manipulation Hackathon an enjoyable and enriching experience for everyone!

The post TIAGo robot multitasking at the IROS Mobile Manipulation Hackathon appeared first on PAL Robotics Blog.

by Judith Viladomat on October 29, 2018 12:57 PM

October 24, 2018
Tomorrow is World MoveIt! Day

@davetcoleman wrote:

Hi ROS Community,

A quick reminder that our 3rd annual hackathon for the motion planning library MoveIt! is tomorrow. Join in from wherever, or at our organized locations in San Francisco, Tokyo, London, Singapore, New Delhi, Stuttgart, San Antonio, and Boulder. We’ll be improving the code base, closing issues, and meeting others in the ROS community.

Full event details

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by @davetcoleman Dave Coleman on October 24, 2018 04:58 PM

October 20, 2018
New packages for Melodic 2018-10-20

@clalancette wrote:

We’re happy to announce the next update for ROS Melodic. We have 34 new packages as well as 60 updated packages.

As always, thanks to all of the maintainers and contributors who help make these updates possible!

Full details are below.

Package Updates for melodic

Added Packages [34]:

Updated Packages [60]:

Removed Packages [0]:

Thanks to all ROS maintainers who make packages available to the ROS community. The above list of packages was made possible by the work of the following maintainers:

  • Alexander Rössler
  • Armin Hornung
  • AutonomouStuff Software Development Team
  • AutonomouStuff Software Team
  • Bence Magyar
  • Brenden Gibbons
  • Canyon Turtle
  • Daniel Stonier
  • Edmond DuPont
  • Gary Servin
  • Gayane Kazhoyan
  • Jorge Santos
  • Kareem Shehata
  • Kris Kozak
  • Marc Alban
  • Mathieu Labbe
  • Micho Radovnikovich
  • Mikael Arguedas
  • Mike Purvis
  • P. J. Reed
  • Paul Bouchier
  • Ralph Lange
  • Robert Haschke
  • Sebastian Pütz
  • Vitor Matos
  • Vladimir Ermakov

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by @clalancette Chris on October 20, 2018 06:41 PM

New packages for Lunar 2018-10-20

@clalancette wrote:

We’re happy to announce the next update for ROS Lunar. We have 49 updated packages.

As always, thanks to all of the maintainers and contributors who help make these updates possible!

Full details are below.

Package Updates for lunar

Added Packages [0]:

Updated Packages [49]:

Removed Packages [0]:

Thanks to all ROS maintainers who make packages available to the ROS community. The above list of packages was made possible by the work of the following maintainers:

  • AutonomouStuff Software Development Team
  • AutonomouStuff Software Team
  • Edmond DuPont
  • Jorge Santos
  • Kris Kozak
  • Marc Alban
  • Mathieu Labbe
  • Mikael Arguedas
  • P. J. Reed
  • Sebastian Pütz
  • Vladimir Ermakov

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by @clalancette Chris on October 20, 2018 01:24 PM

October 19, 2018
ROS 2 TSC Minutes October 17th, 2018

@tfoote wrote:

October 17th, 2018

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by @tfoote Tully Foote on October 19, 2018 11:00 PM

Planning future ROS 1 distribution(s)

@dirk-thomas wrote:

tl;dr: Open Robotics intends to create a ROS 1 distribution in May 2020 targeting Python 3, but we’ll need your help to make it successful.

In the recent past ROS 1 distributions have been created by Open Robotics (OR) once every year in May. On even numbered years a ROS distribution came with 5 years of support (long-term support, or LTS), while in odd years with only 2 years of support (non-LTS). Since the non-LTS ROS distributions are not being used much by the community OR decided earlier this year to not proceed with non-LTS releases but only release an LTS ROS distro every two years.

In light of ROS 2 gaining more traction the question recently came up what this means for ROS 1 releases. The discussion includes both perspectives (this is just a brief description of the two major directions):

  • On one hand the majority of effort and funding is being spent on ROS 2. So instead of splitting the attention no future ROS 1 distros after the already released Melodic should be made.

  • On the other hand there is a large community using ROS 1 with no (immediate) plans to migrate to ROS 2 and ROS 2 is not as feature rich and complete as ROS 1 at this moment.

We need to carefully balance the pros and cons for future ROS 1 distributions. On the one hand we want both ROS versions to coexist for as long as feasible to allow a migration over time, but on the other hand we are bound by resource constraints. Here we mean not just OR but all ROS 1 package maintainers, wherever they work. As has been pointed out by @Pyo, each new ROS 1 distro creates an initial development and subsequent maintenance burden for anyone who releases their packages for that new distro. As @gerkey said, OR doesn’t receive funding directed at this kind of work, and I would guess that the same is true at other organizations.

Looking at the current state of ROS 2 it has certainly gained a lot of features in the core and many porting efforts of important capabilities (like navigation, moveit, image pipeline) are on the way. That being said there is still some way to go to before it can match up with ROS 1 in various areas, just to mention one area: documentation and tutorials.

Looking at the current support timeline of ROS 1 the latest distribution Melodic was released in 2018 and will be supported until 2023. While that gives us a timeline of 4.5 years in principle, there are two factors which limit the effective support horizon:

  • At some point in the future ROS 2 will target a newer version of Ubuntu (namely 20.04). Commonly for ROS distributions that happens for the next ROS distro released after the Ubuntu LTS becomes available. While the concrete point in time is up for discussion, at some point that move will happen - very likely before 2023. Then not having a new ROS 1 distro targeting a newer version of Ubuntu would leave us in a “split” situation: the latest versions of ROS 1 and ROS 2 would not be supported on the same Ubuntu distribution which would make using a heterogeneous system much more challenging. As such this split would also make any gradual migration effort more difficult. This aspect shrinks the supported time window to the overlap between ROS 1 and ROS 2 distros on a common platform which is less than 4.5 years - more like 2-3 years (also noted by @mikeferguson).

  • The second aspect limiting the effective support window of ROS 1 Melodic is the EOL of Python 2 in the beginning of 2020. While existing distributions and packages will continue to exist, the unavailability of security patches moving forward will likely significantly hinder the ability to continue using Python 2 software. So the effective time window becomes even shorter - more realistically something around 1.5-2 years.

Based on these considerations OR has decided to commit some resources to creating a ROS 1 release, code-named Noetic Ninjemys (Noetic) in ~ May 2020 which will target Python 3 (instead of Python 2). The availability of that ROS 1 distribution will address both limitations described above and effectively ensure a coexistence of ROS 1 and ROS 2 until at least 2025. While in 2022 new ROS 2 distributions will likely target newer Ubuntu distros (which are not supported by ROS 1 Noetic) that is less of a problem for the coexistence / migration since by then we certainly expect the ROS 2 release from 2020 / 2021 to be a viable platform users can stick to. (At the moment that is much less the case while significant features are still being worked on and previous releases are not necessarily in a viable state to be used.)

That being said the transition from Python 2 to Python 3 in ROS 1 is certainly a significant one. While OR will contribute to create a Noetic release in 2020 the scope of work is much higher. It requires the whole community to contribute to the effort - otherwise Noetic would just contain a fraction of packages of previous ROS 1 releases or if not tested extensively the quality might be subpar.

In the context of a ROS 1 Noetic release and ROS 2 porting effort you can see the Python 3 transition as a benefit to both worlds. Either a package is first being made compatible with Python 3 for Noetic and then ported to ROS 2, or a package is first ported to ROS 2 (which involves making it work with Python 3) and then the Python 3 specific changes can be ported for the Noetic release. Either way the step to Python 3 is necessary.

As with any ROS distribution, it’ll be up to package maintainers to decide whether and when to release their packages into Noetic. And as always, all community members will be welcome to step up and help to get package(s) released. If you see something missing from any supported ROS distro, consider volunteering your time to help with the release. If it’s a package that you deeply care about, consider volunteering to become a co-maintainer or even to take on sole maintainership. You’re very likely to get a positive response from package maintainers. And given the extra effort because of the Python 3 transition, we expect that we’ll need much more such community assistance than we’ve had in the past for Noetic to become a complete distro.

What does that mean for ROS 1 beyond Noetic? At the moment OR can’t commit to continue investing resources into future ROS 1 releases past Noetic. So OR does not intend to spend effort on a O-turtle ROS 1 release. If there is significant interest from the community this should by no means imply that there can’t be more ROS 1 releases. All the infrastructure is open and if one or multiple entities would like to take on the responsibility for rolling future ROS 1 distributions OR will be more than happy to help them getting started with that effort.

We hope this provides a clear direction for ROS 1 for the foreseeable future and some level of certainty what to expect from OR.

Your ROS team @ Open Robotics

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by @dirk-thomas Dirk Thomas on October 19, 2018 08:41 PM

October 18, 2018
Official docker images outdated, resulting in segfaults

@flixr wrote:

Hi all,

The ros:kinetic-ros-base image is currently outdated, which results in segfaults when trying to just install another release package from the official apt repo on top and run it.

In my case it was the outdated rostime which caused a segfault: the image has 0.6.9, while 0.6.11 is the latest (and which the packages in the apt repo are built against).

@ruffsl could you please build a new set of kinetic images?

How the images are built in general and how often they get update was already discussed before: Announcing ROS Docker Images for ARM and Debian

I would propose to at least update the core and base packages when a new sync is done.
Would also be happy to help here.

Cheers, Felix

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by @flixr Felix Ruess on October 18, 2018 02:36 PM

October 17, 2018
REP 144 Voting: Formalizing ROS Package Naming Rules

@tfoote wrote:

Hi Everyone,

Please take a look at the proposed REP 144 for final voting.

The body of the rep is available at http://www.ros.org/reps/rep-0144.html pending a few clarifications in the initial parts of the final review.

This is just formalizing the naming requirements into a REP from what’s already expressed on the wiki page: https://wiki.ros.org/ROS/Patterns/Conventions#Naming_ROS_Resources

And please follow up with a vote on the issue to ratify the REP in the github issue. REP voting guidelines are available at http://www.ros.org/reps/rep-0010.html

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by @tfoote Tully Foote on October 17, 2018 10:00 PM

Moveit! now enabled for ROS1 on Windows

@seanyen-msft wrote:

We are excited to introduce another update for ROS1 on Windows! Now we have Moveit! enabled for ROS1 on Windows, plus an example guide how to enable Universal Robot UR3 running with it.

Find out more details, please checkout http://aka.ms/ros.

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by @seanyen-msft Sean Yen [Msft] on October 17, 2018 09:51 PM

[ros2arduino] Discussion for development : ROS2 library for Arduino

@Kei wrote:

Hello,

I am writing this article today to introduce the ros2arduino and open a discussion forum.
ros2arduino is aimed at the ROS2 library available in Arduino, like rosserial_arduino in ros1.
This is currently included in the roadmap for the next release of ROS2.
Below is ros2arduino’s plan on current roadmap.

ros2arduino (using RTPS supporting XRCE such as microRTPS; note that this approach uses a different wire protocol from ROS 2 atop a full DDS/RTPS system)

  • supports TurtleBot3’s embedded system (OpenCR, it supports Arduino IDE)
  • supports Arduino MEGA, ZERO and other compatible microcontrollers
  • make message header and API generator
  • provide tutorials (e.g., Arduino IDE Setup, custom message, LED/Servo/Sensors control, TF, simple robot)

The previous step of this ros2arduino was to support ROS2 of the TB3 burger.
And now we want to create a library that is commonly available on the Arduino as well as the TB3 burger.

The Github Repository is this link.
The code that is currently in use is from TB3.
But, it can not be used on general arduino boards yet because it depends on microRTPS.

Anyway, since this is open source, I hope you will discuss and contribute together if you want.

Here are some of the things that I think we need to discuss.

  • Build system : for Arduino IDE’s compile method. (@Ingo_Lutkebohle mentioned modm as one of the considerations.)
  • S/W architecture
  • Programming language version
  • Etc…

I think we can not make it perfect from the beginning.
We will continue to develop for the release and hope that this discussion will lead to a better library.

Any kind of contribution is welcome.

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by @Kei Kei on October 17, 2018 12:11 PM


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