April 20, 2018
ROSCon 2018 Diversity Scholarships

The ROSCon 2018 organizing committee aims for ROSCon to represent the entire ROS community, which is diverse and global. In addition to promoting technology that is open source, we also strive to ensure that our communities themselves are as open and accessible as possible, since we recognize that diversity benefits the ROS ecosystem as a whole.

Whoever you are, whatever you do, and wherever you do it, if you're interested in ROS, then we want you to join us at ROSCon. To help reduce the financial barriers to conference attendance, the ROSCon organizing committee is offering a number of scholarships to members of traditionally underrepresented groups in the tech community. Thanks to the support of the program's sponsors, these scholarships each include a complimentary conference registration pass and three nights' accommodation shared with another recipient[1]. Limited travel support is available for participants whose travel to the conference would otherwise be infeasible[2]. Please note that all other expenses (including any visa requirements) will be the responsibility of the participant.

  • [1] To maximize the impact of the scholarship funds, scholarship recipients will be asked to share a room with another recipient. Under special circumstances alternative arrangements can be accommodated.
  • [2] Participants will be responsible for covering their travel expenses up-front, as the travel support will be provided at the conference.

Eligibility

We invite applications from members of groups that have been traditionally underrepresented in the robotics community (including but not limited to: women, LGBTQ+, people of color, people with disabilities, people from racial and/or ethnic minorities in the robotics community, and people from developing nations), who may not otherwise be able to attend ROSCon.

Previous ROSCon Diversity Scholarship recipients are not eligible to re-apply, but we are proud to share this feedback from a participant of the 2017 Diversity Program:

The ROSCon Diversity Scholarship Program provided me with an opportunity that would have been completely impossible without it. I was able to attend my first robotics conference and feel empowered to keep working to try and make a positive impact on this community. Also, it was very encouraging to see so many companies stepping up to promote and enable diversity within their companies and the robotics community. Thank you!

Sponsors

The ROSCon 2018 Diversity Program is made possible with support from the following sponsors:

amazon_logo

erle_logo

fetch_logo

google_logo

locus_logo

open_robotics_logo

If your organization is interested in getting involved in the Diversity Program, please get in contact.

How to Apply

To apply, fill out this form by May 6 2018, describing how you are involved with ROS and the robotics community and what you hope to get out of attending ROSCon. Scholarships will be awarded based on a combination of need and impact. Every applicant will be notified of the outcome of their application.

For more information about ROSCon 2018, including the program, code of conduct, and childcare options, please see http://roscon.ros.org/2018

Thank you to the conference Platinum Sponsor, Erle, and to our Gold Sponsors: Amazon, Clearpath, Fetch Robotics, Google, Locus, ROBOTIS, Tier IV, Universal Robots.

by Tully Foote on April 20, 2018 11:34 PM

ROSCon 2018 Diversity Scholarships: Applications Open

@dhood wrote:

The ROSCon 2018 organizing committee aims for ROSCon to represent the entire ROS community, which is diverse and global. In addition to promoting technology that is open source, we also strive to ensure that our communities themselves are as open and accessible as possible, since we recognize that diversity benefits the ROS ecosystem as a whole.

Whoever you are, whatever you do, and wherever you do it, if you’re interested in ROS, then we want you to join us at ROSCon. To help reduce the financial barriers to conference attendance, the ROSCon organizing committee is offering a number of scholarships to members of traditionally underrepresented groups in the tech community. Thanks to the support of the program’s sponsors, these scholarships each include a complimentary conference registration pass and three nights’ accommodation shared with another recipient*. Limited travel support is available for participants whose travel to the conference would otherwise be infeasible**. Please note that all other expenses (including any visa requirements) will be the responsibility of the participant.

*To maximize the impact of the scholarship funds, scholarship recipients will be asked to share a room with another recipient. Under special circumstances alternative arrangements can be accommodated.
**Participants will be responsible for covering their travel expenses up-front, as the travel support will be provided once at the conference.

Eligibility

We invite applications from members of groups that have been traditionally underrepresented in the robotics community (including but not limited to: women, LGBTQ+, people with disabilities, people from racial and/or ethnic minorities in the robotics community, and people from developing nations), who may not otherwise be able to attend ROSCon.

Previous ROSCon Diversity Scholarship recipients are not eligible to re-apply, but we are proud to share this feedback from a participant of the 2017 Diversity Program:

The ROSCon Diversity Scholarship Program provided me with an opportunity that would have been completely impossible without it. I was able to attend my first robotics conference and feel empowered to keep working to try and make a positive impact on this community. Also, it was very encouraging to see so many companies stepping up to promote and enable diversity within their companies and the robotics community. Thank you!

Sponsors

The ROSCon 2018 Diversity Program is made possible with support from the following sponsors:

amazon_logo

locus_logo

If your organization is interested in getting involved in the Diversity Program, please get in contact.

We also thank the conference Platinum Sponsor, Erle, and Gold Sponsors: Amazon, Clearpath, Fetch Robotics, Google, Locus, ROBOTIS, Tier IV, Universal Robots.

How to apply

To apply, fill out this form by May 6 2018, describing how you are involved with ROS and the robotics community and what you hope to get out of attending ROSCon. Scholarships will be awarded based on a combination of need and impact. Every applicant will be notified of the outcome of their application.

For more information about ROSCon 2018, including the program, code of conduct, and childcare options, please see http://roscon.ros.org/2018

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by @dhood dhood on April 20, 2018 11:18 PM

April 19, 2018
[meetings] Call for ROS Tutorials:ROS Developers Conference 2018

@YUHONG_LIN wrote:

Call for Contributions: ROS Developers Conference 2018


Date: July 7-8, 2018
Website: http://www.rosdevcon.com

[ OVERVIEW ]

The first ROS Developers Online Conference is a completely practical conference for ROS developers. The conference aims to connect ROS developers around the world without geographical restrictions and to advance ROS levels through real-time practice.

We will host eight top ROS developers to give tutorials of real ROS projects: during the conference, all participants will program together the projects at the same time with the speaker.

  • All the participants will have to practice at the same time with the speaker along the conference.
  • No installation of anything required. Only require a computer and internet connection. Any type of computer will work.
  • All the participants will have full access to the ROS development studio for programming
  • All participants will receive a pdf document with all the steps described during the conference
  • All the participants will receive a copy of the ROS Developers Guide e-book.
  • Each speech will be 30 minutes plus 10 minutes Q&A.

[ CALL FOR TUTORIALS ]

  • The proposals must be sent to this address: tutorial@rosdevcon.com
  • Submission deadline: April 30, 2018
  • The tutorial should last 30 mins + 10 mins Q&A

Tutorial should target fields of robotics using ROS and focus on practice, in order to provide a real practical conference to participants and to exchange developing research results and ideas. The submission of a tutorial must contain the following information:

  • Title
  • Speaker Information
  • Why do you prefer ROS?
  • Statement of objectives: what is your speech about and what are you going to make attendants practice

If your tutorial is accepted, you will have to prepare the following material (with our support):

  • A notebook with the tutorial
  • Package with pre-defined code for participants

[ ORGANIZERS ]

The Construct (http://www.theconstructsim.com/)
You can contact us with questions and doubts here: info@rosdevcon.com

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by @YUHONG_LIN on April 19, 2018 09:41 AM

April 18, 2018
Industry 4.0 is the trend at GREX

Innovation has landed in Madrid! Global Robot Expo (GREX) starts today and will be in IFEMA until Friday. The large pavilion is filled with all kinds of robotics, from collaborative and service robotics to 3D-printed components or domotics.

One of the fair’s highlights is Industry 4.0, the upcoming revolution in industry that adds cyber-physical systems – like robots – in assembly chains. PAL Robotics travelled to Madrid with the robotic solutions designed to assist in this new scenarios: TIAGo, TIAGo base and StockBot. Find us at stands 109-110!

TIAGo-gripper-looks-grex-robot-cobot

 

PAL Robotics CEO Keynote at GREX: cobots in Industry

PAL Robotics’ CEO, Francesco Ferro, is giving a keynote at GREX on “Industry 4.0 with collaborative and service robotics”. After more than 14 years developing reliable humanoid robots, at PAL Robotics we leveraged that know-how to design robots that can safely improve industrial processes.

Over there Mr. Ferro will explain how our solutions make a difference in several industrial scenarios. He will give insights of the humanoid and high-performance biped TALOS, and also of TIAGo, StockBot and TIAGo Base. Save the date! Come tomorrow at 12:30h at the GREX Industry 4.0 Area.

 

Which PAL robots can you meet at GREX?

Join our cobot TIAGo at Global Robot Expo! TIAGo is showing its skills in manipulation, perception, navigation and Human-Robot Interaction with some demos that attendees themselves can try. One example is an easy way to program the robot even if the person doesn’t have programming skills. TIAGo can be taught how to perform new movements by simply guiding its hand.

The autonomous intelligent TIAGo base for courier is also at GREX, as well as StockBot, the platform that provides a complete picture of what is inside a store or a warehouse. StockBot is provided with safe autonomous navigation that enables it to work autonomously, and uses RFID combined with vision cameras to exhaustively detect and locate all items in a given space.

 

 

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by Judith Viladomat on April 18, 2018 11:29 AM

ROS Melodic Morenia Logo and Tshirt Campaign

With each release of ROS we have a tradition of having a logo and making t-shirts. ROS Melodic Morenia is coming out in May. To let you show your ROS colors and support this tradition, we have setup a Teespring Campaign in both the US and the EU. Note that both these campaigns can ship worldwide.

Ordering will be open until May 8th. Order now!

melodic_tshirt.jpg

Since this is the first public announcement, here's the full graphic for Melodic Morenia.

melodic_logo.jpg

Thanks to everyone who's been helping prepare the Melodic release. We're looking forward to the release in May. We expect the tshirts ordered in this campaign will arrive just before ROS Melodic Morenia is released!

by Tully Foote on April 18, 2018 07:09 AM

April 17, 2018
ROS Developers Podcast (RDP)

@YUHONG_LIN wrote:

ROS Developers Podcast is a podcast for developers who are passionate about ROS. Learn ROS and related technologies. Updated every Monday.

If you want to share your ROS research results or experience with more ROS enthusiasts in our podcasts, please contact info@theconstructsim.com.

  • RDP 012: Everything about ROS 2 with Dirk Thomas
    In this episode we talk to Dirk Thomas about ROS 2 and some other details about development tools of ROS 1.
    He will explain about:

    • Why roscd bring us to the devel directory instead of to the compilation directory.
    • Why they decided to change from rosbuild to catkin_make
    • What can be used ROS buildfarm for
    • Why ROS 2 is necessary
    • How to use the ros1_bridge to connect ROS 1 programs with ROS 2 ones
    • Some examples of ROS 2 applications already working
    • What is the ROS 2 roadmap
    • … and many more things
  • RDP 011: Building Robotics Products With David Crawley
    In this episode we talk to David Crawley founder of Ubiquity Robotics.
    He will explain about the idea of using built robots for building more complex robotics products and applications. He will also explain about:

    • What their robotics platform provides off-the-shelf, in terms of hardware and software
    • Their own ROS distribution for Raspberry Pi
    • Their already training deep learning network for recognizing common objects from the Raspberry Pi
      … and many more things
  • RDP 010: Programming Pepper with ROS for the Robocup with Florian Lier
    In this episode we talk to Florian Lier about what his team ToBI is doing to program Pepper the robot for the Robocup@Home competition.
    We will explain the whole architecture they are using to program Pepper with ROS for the competition including:

    • In which computer to run which code
    • ROS wrappers for NaoQi
    • How to use a good Pepper simulation using Morse simulator
    • Which environments to use to develop robot behaviors, and where to find them
    • How they are integrating with automatic regression tests
  • RDP 009: Learning about Gazebo Simulator with Louise Poubel
    In this episode we talk to one of the main developers of the Gazebo simulator: Louise Poubel. She tells us about the ins and outs of Gazebo, how do they organize at OSRF to develop the simulator, why to discard Gazebo 2 and how to install the newest versions. She will also clarify us what are the Ignition libraries and why OSRF is putting so much attention to them for the development of Gazebo. Additionally, she will talk about Gazebo plugins, SDF versus URDF, rendering in Gazebo, skeleton animation and many more things.

  • RDP 008: Building Accessible ROSbots With Jack Pien
    In this episode, Jack Pien will talk about how to use accessible robots based on ROS and OpenCV to learn robotics. Those robots are called ROSbots and Jack is the creator of them.
    ROSbots come with ROS and OpenCV installed on a Raspberry Pi onboard the robot, ready for the user to create applications for it using the camera and the motor.
    The purpose of those robots is to provide hackable robots, on which you can put your hands on, and implement all those robotics algorithms that you study.

  • RDP 007: Making Aibo Walk Again With ROS With Cecilio Angulo
    In this session of The ROS Developers Podcast, I chat with Cecilio Angulo, associate professor at Technical University of Catalonia and director of the Intelligent Data Science and Artificial Intelligence Research Center. We will talk about a project he started to bring Aibo robot back to life again by using ROS.
    He talks about how the whole thing started and why. Then he describes the different parts implemented in the Aibo ROSification and how the Aibo simulation in Gazebo is important for the development. He also describes the application that makes several Aibo imitate to each other by connecting all of them through a ROS node, as well as the modules for accessing different sensors of Aibo. Finally, we talk about how to make a ROSified Aibo reproduce the famous MTN (motion) files that Sone generated containing predefined movements.

  • RDP 006: Using ROS for Industrial Projects With Carlos Rosales
    In this episode of The ROS Developers Podcast, we chat with Carlos Rosales, CTO of Beta Robots a company dedicated to apply ROS into real life industrial projects.
    He talks about the simulation model of the softhand, an open source hand with 5 fingers that is flexible and that absorbs collisions. He will also talk about different projects he and his company have been involved including industrial manipulators, perception and grasping. Finally he will provide some information about the Master of Robotics he is doing, including some links to the git of the master and the slides.

  • RDP 005: Learning about the Open Stack Of Tasks for Humanoids With Enrico Mingo Hoffman
    In this episode, we interview Enrico Mingo Hoffman, postdoc researcher at the Humanoids & Human Centered Mechatronics Lab of the Italian Institute of Technology.He will talk about their open implementation of the Stack of Tasks for the whole body control of humanoid (and non-humanoid) robots. He will also explain how their development environment at the lab works, and will discuss some differences between ROS and YARP, another framework for robot programming developed at Italy. He will end suggesting about the creation of an OSRF – Europe. Do not miss that!

  • RDP 004: Using Docker to Cross-Compile ROS With Francisco Martin
    In this episode, we interview Francisco Martin, associated professor at the University Juan Carlos I in Madrid, where he teaches robotics by using ROS. He is also a participant of the Robocup and the ROCKin competitions. He will explain how have they hacked Pepper the robot by means of using docker machines to cross-compile ROS code for Pepper. Francisco will also tell us about with research work on applying cognitive architectures to the control of robots, using ROS Plan inside Pepper to figure out the situation of the robot.

  • RDP 003: Programming With ROS For The Robocup With Sam Pfeiffer
    In this session of The ROS Developers Podcast, we chat with Sam Pfeiffer, who is a PhD student at University of Technology, Sydney where he leads the team of the University that goes to the Robocup with the Pepper robot. Among other things, he will explain us how he ROSified Pepper for that competition. He will also talk about how other participants of the competition are using Deep Learning to win, and how you can do that with ROS. Finally, he will recommend us some useful tools for programming with ROS, like for example a tool that he coded himself that allows to identify the ROS messages used by a remote ROS system, and create automatically a definition for the ones that your system does not have, so you can talk to the remote ROS system.

  • RDP 002: Programming Field Service Robots With Ryan Gariepy
    In this episode, Ryan Gariepy CTO of Clearpath Robotics talks about how they use ROS for field service robots. He will explain how he uses vim for coding with ROS their field service robots. He will also express his point of view about the current status of ROS based on his large experience on using ROS for real life service robots. Finally, he will give some recommendations to the new comers and indicate that there is a huge future with ROS at Clearpath. By the way… they are hiring!

  • RDP 001: Programming Human Size Humanoid Robots With Luca Marchionni
    In this episode, Luca Marchionni CTO of Pal Robotics talks about how they use ROS for their humanoid robots. He will specifically describe how they achieved to control with ROS a human size humanoid robot that walks and required real time control. He will also reveal how they attached the NASA Space Robotics Challenge in order to reach third position at the competition. Finally, he will recommend one tool for ROS developers that helps them in their daily life as ROS developers.

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by @YUHONG_LIN on April 17, 2018 03:38 PM

Dirk Thomas Interviewed on ROS Developers Podcast

This week Dirk Thomas was interviewed on the ROS Developers Podcast talking about ROS2 and ROS1 information.

You can listen here:

by Tully Foote on April 17, 2018 12:37 AM

April 16, 2018
Ros-env a general purpose distribution loader

@byteofsoren wrote:

Hi there I’m new.
I have implemented a tool to change ros distribution on a machine that have more than one distribution. It also makes the initial setup of the environments a bit more easy.

With my tool the initial pase of starting Ros on a Linux computer is just write the following to get ros lunar working.

$ echo “.rosrc” >> .bashrc
$ ros-env lunar

https://github.com/byteofsoren/ros-env

So I’m just wondering if any one have any suggestion for improvement to the tool.
/Magnus Sörensen.

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by @byteofsoren Magnus Sörensen on April 16, 2018 09:09 PM

ROS Melodic Morenia Tshirts available!

@clalancette wrote:

Get your ROS Melodic Tshirt or Hoodie!

Ordering will be open until May 8th. Order now!

With each release of ROS we have a tradition of having a logo and making t-shirts. ROS Melodic Morenia is coming out in May. To let you show your ROS colors and support this tradition, we have setup a Teespring Campaign in both the US and the EU. Note that both these campaigns can ship worldwide.

Since this is the first public announcement, here’s the full graphic for Melodic Morenia.

Thanks to everyone who’s been helping prepare the Melodic release. We’re looking forward to the release in May. We expect the tshirts ordered in this campaign will arrive just before ROS Melodic Morenia is released!

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by @clalancette Chris on April 16, 2018 06:31 PM

Data quality of ASUS Xtion 2

@Martin_Guenther wrote:

Does anyone have experience with the ASUS Xtion 2? Is the depth quality still comparable with the original ASUS Xtion? There’s an old thread that asked the same question, but got no replies.

I’ve seen that JSK has an installation page, so perhaps one of you guys can help me out? @knorth55 @wkentaro @k-okada

What would be really great would be a rosbag, ideally just a freehand camera pointing at a table with some objects and moving around a bit.

Cheers,
Martin

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by @Martin_Guenther Martin Günther on April 16, 2018 08:31 AM

The European Robotics League (ERL) Winners, unveiled at ERF2018!

An exciting Season of the European Robotics League (ERL) came to an end at the European Robotics Forum in Tampere (Finland), where we all discovered who were the TBMs winners! The ERL Awards Ceremony was celebrated during the Gala Dinner in front of the whole European robotics community, and had a very special guest on stage: a TIAGo dressed in the traditional Finnish way!

Representatives of all ERL Categories (Industry, Emergency and Service) gave the awards to the teams that scored more points in each Task Benchmark at the overall classification, using their best two participations in tournaments.

The ERL Service Robotics Winners

As Sponsors of the ERL SR Competition, PAL Robotics CEO, and also euRobotics Board Director, Mr. Ferro, praised the efforts that all the teams put in performances that gave such amazing results, highlighting how important are the developments in the Service Robotics to enhance people’s quality of life.

From PAL Robotics we want to congratulate the five winner teams of the Service Robotics Category. We were lucky enough to see their impressive performance during the ERL SR Local Tournament that we hosted in Barcelona, where they were all participating – and most of them with a TIAGo robot!

Here’s the ERL SR 2017-2018 Final Classification:

  • homer@UniKoblenz (Germany) – 1st prize for:
    • Task Benchmark 1 “Getting to Know My Home
    • Task Benchmark 2 “Welcoming Visitors
    • Task Benchmark 3 “Catering for Granny Annie’s Comfort
    • Task Benchmark 5 “General Purpose Service Robot (GPSR)
  • HEARTS (UK) – 1st prize for:
    • Task Benchmark 2 “Welcoming Visitors
    • Functionality Benchmark 3 “Speech Recognition
  • IRI@ERL (Spain) – 1st prize for:
    • Task Benchmark 2 “Welcoming Visitors
    • Task Benchmark 3 “Catering for Granny Annie’s Comfort
  • RoboticsLab UC3M (Spain) – 1st prize prize for:
    • Task Benchmark 4 “Visit My Home
  • SocRob@Home (Portugal) – 1st prize for:
    • Task Benchmark 1 “Getting to Know My Home

Congratulations to all!

Pictures credits: Visual Outcasts / euRobotics.

The post The European Robotics League (ERL) Winners, unveiled at ERF2018! appeared first on PAL Robotics Blog.

by Judith Viladomat on April 16, 2018 08:10 AM

April 15, 2018
Is there a roslaunch or other way to supervise ROS2 packages?

@ArkadiuszN wrote:

Is there a counterpart of roslaunch/launchfiles in ROS2? If no, is it planned? How do you supervise your nodes and restart it in case of crash?

Edit: I see:

Launch system using components and life-cycle

On the https://github.com/ros2/ros2/wiki/Roadmap
So the question is what is currently the best way to supervise a ROS2 node?

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by @ArkadiuszN Arkadiusz on April 15, 2018 01:07 PM

April 14, 2018
Robot As a Service, anyone?

@pitosalas wrote:

We’ve gotten interested in collaborating with our University Library to create a “robot as a service” facility. I am in the process of writing a grant and was curious whether anyone here had done something like that who would want to exchange ideas.

p.s. I’ve found several related papers which I would attach here if only I knew how.

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by @pitosalas Pito Salas on April 14, 2018 04:04 PM

April 13, 2018
ERF 2018: the Robotics community at the Finnish Winter Wonderland!

Snowy privileged landscapes surrounded this year’s European Robotics Forum (ERF) celebrated in Finland. The European robotics community was brought together in the city of Tampere to take part in this must-attend event, with an agenda full of highlights. Here’s a glimpse of our ERF experience!

tiago-dinner-erf-robot-finland-pal-robotics

TIAGo wearing a traditional Finnish suit. Credits: euRobotics / Visual Outcast

“Robots and Us”

One sign that proves how the sector is gaining relevance is that participants’ numbers keep increasing year after year, growing to over 900 attendees in this edition. The humanoid REEM-C and the cobot TIAGo were quite busy on the crowded exhibition area!

It is remarkable the amount of Workshops – more than 50 – that tackled each and every aspect of robotics with experts and specialists. In some of them, we shared our experience in developing biped and collaborative robots, and participated in discussions on the challenges that the field is facing.

ROS makes it easier

Learning robotics has become much easier thanks to the Robot Operating System (ROS). One of the actions we took for that purpose is to put available the simulation of all of our robots for free on their ROS Wiki. During the “Teaching Robotics with ROS” Workshop, we talked about the TIAGo Tutorials published on its ROS Wiki, with easy steps to run the robot in simulation and test any idea on it.

Getting closer to the Finnish locals

The frozen lake where some brave ERF attendees could swim

The frozen lake where some brave ERF attendees could swim

Once in Finland, TIAGo got into the mood very fast, to the point that he co-hosted the ERF Gala Dinner wearing a traditional Finnish custom – following with last year’s kilt edition in Scotland!

ERF organizers made us feel like locals bringing us to traditional experiences, such as the combination of sauna and winter swimming in a frozen lake that some attendees could enjoy (and suffer at the same time). We also had the opportunity to talk about robotics with the new generations of Finnish kids – hopefully some roboticists will be born from this!

Thank you euRobotics and ERF 2018 organizers for making this European Robotics Forum possible! Can’t wait for the next edition; Romania, here we go!

 

 

ERF organizer Jyrki Larkotarkano with TIAGo and Mr. Ferro Award winners ceremony during ERF Gala Dinner, co-hosted by TIAGo robot Schools visiting ERF TIAGo robot watching the snow

The post ERF 2018: the Robotics community at the Finnish Winter Wonderland! appeared first on PAL Robotics Blog.

by Judith Viladomat on April 13, 2018 02:48 PM

Leveraging Scan-N-Plan for Additive Manufacturing

Implementing Additive Manufacturing (AM) principles with a collaborative twist is still an unexplored area of manufacturing. Traditional AM typically involves step motors moving a printing head, or a laser bonding a material to itself. More advanced solutions have even gone to mounting print heads as robotic end effectors to gain a larger print volume. A ROS framework has already been developed in this space, though additional features are always of interest.

Often when a part is damaged it is either thrown out or repaired with direct labor. What if there was a way for autonomous blending part repair with AM? Assuming a known CAD model, a Scan-N-Plan AM solution could bring new life to previously scrapped parts. The method proposed here involves bringing in a damaged part, doing a laser scan and determine which elements of the part need repair.

Laser scans produce good resolution of parts and is largely insensitive to material and surface quality though some cases may require several scans to achieve high resolution. A pre-scan process can easily assume this role to reduce print downtime. The scan in the image below was done on a FARO arm. As can be seen, in the image below, the quality is excellent. The file exports a point cloud that can be imported into the ROS framework. Similarly, a non-contact structured light sensor could provide the output as seen below, whereby subsequent process planning could be driven.

Crack.jpg

Once the file is scanned, the part is then checked against a master CAD file. The deviation of the point clouds indicates where the flaw exists. The point cloud is then converted to a YAML file and the path is generated. Locating the part between scan and print head is done using 3 known touch off points or a non-contact form of localization. The material deposition process is then free to take place. For cases such as the above example where prep-work is required to enable material deposition, a cutting or grinding tool can be process planned and executed as well to create a suitable prepared region for material deposition to occur.

Additive Value Stream Reman.png

In remanufacturing use cases, specifically where the variation is high due to the unknown state of the provided material, a more efficient workflow with higher return and repurposing of field return material is possible. The leverage of a ROS-based framework in a distributed manner could enable common intelligence being applied over a range of assets residing at multiple sites, making process control more uniform wherever the operation takes place. Furthermore, as in the case in remanufacturing, as opposed to additive processing (building up) a complete part, leveraging the Scan-N-Plan framework enables optimization of applying only where the additive process delivers the most value in the broader context of the value stream and cost of both incoming materials and the processing itself. An example of this would be the replacement of a linkage forging on a structure with an additive deposit, where the remaining structure is fabricated plate material, the additive can be optimized to both manage load (print direction and properties), while optimizing costs where commodities do the job and are readily available at favorable costs.

Issues that could arise with this process include interference with the print head with the part (oddly shaped flange interfering with a robot wrist independent of the print head) and cable management for certain types of deposition processes. Though material waste is minimal with advances in additive near-net processing, there is the cost and maintenance of the media and encompassing all of the tools that need to be accessible to the manipulator, from the QA assessment, material prep/finish/surface treatments, and of course the AM process itself. Underside printing would be a second print unless an auxiliary positioner is implemented, such as in some of the more recent hybrid additive/subtractive platforms.

Physical attributes of a repair part are untested based on metallurgical properties. Part repair is still a fledging industry of research, though there have been recent advances in aerospace remanufacturing. Cohen has done some work with tissue engineering and still uses a 3-axis step motor . Great advances still stand to be made in this research area, however a number of tools exist to create an agile process leveraging the benefits of additive and approaches like Scan-N-Plan.

by Ryan Howard on April 13, 2018 01:55 PM

April 11, 2018
Announcing rosbag.js - read rosbags with JavaScript in node.js & the browser

@Brian_Carlson wrote:

Hi! I’m an engineer working at Cruise Automation and wanted to announce we’ve released a rosbag parsing library for node.js and the browser. rosbag.js. This library has been indispensable for several internal projects and we wanted to share it with the community.

rosbag.js uses an eval-based parser generator based on ROS message definitions for each topic. The generator allows rosbog.js to take advantage of the V8 JIT, providing high-speed parsing. It also uses FileReader for fast random access to bag data.

If you need help getting rosbag.js up-and-running or want to suggest features you’d like to see, please stop by the GitHub page and open an issue. Enjoy!

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by @Brian_Carlson Brian Carlson on April 11, 2018 03:43 PM

Pcl_ros with PCL 1.8 (ROS Lunar and newer) means linking to 139 VTK dynamic libraries

@peci1 wrote:

Compiling ROS from source I’ve noticed that PCL 1.8 (and thus pcl_ros) links to a newer version of the VTK library, which yields unbelievable 139 dynamic libraries to be linked to my programs. Crazy! According to https://stackoverflow.com/a/36984905/1076564 , there is some performance penalty for every dynamically linked library.

Together with dependencies of the VTK libraries, we get to this number:

ldd /opt/ros/lunar/lib/libpcl_ros_surface.so | wc -l
329

And all of that just to be able to transform a pointcloud (no visualizations etc).

I think pcl_ros should be refactored to two packages, one for “computing” and the other for visualizations. That could probably push the number of linked libraries much lower for computing-only uses of pcl_ros. Or it could be modularized even more… Not everybody needs surface reconstruction capabilities, for example.

What’s your opinion on this? Or is there some good reason to keep it all in one package?

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by @peci1 Martin Pecka on April 11, 2018 09:27 AM

Self-driving Racing Challenge, car platform provided. Compete ●Connect● Grow

@PIX_Moving wrote:

DIY Robocars KuaiKai Self-driving Racing Challenge
Let’s grow, connect and test self-driving technology in a more interesting way.

In Short
DIY Robocars KuaiKai provides car platforms equipped with computing platform, sensors, and by-wire control support for self-driving engineers, and also closed urban roads for racing. Theoretically, you can just save your algorithms to the flash disk and then you are good to go for the racing (kidding, but it’s almost that simple). If you are still a hobbyist engineer without too much experience on the full-sized self-driving vehicle, you can choose to participate KuaiKai small-sized car onsite racing on the indoor racetrack.

About DIY Robocars KuaiKai

  • A Racing with Prize. DIY Robocars KuaiKai is a racing event dedicated to self-driving. Participants come onsite to compete, race, test and optimize their self-driving software and algorithms.
  • An Event to Network and Connect. It’s also an international event for global self-driivng startups, students, engineers, developers and enthusiasts to gather together for networking, communication and mutual growth.
  • Mark the Moments. DIY Robocars KuaiKai is a special way to mark the progress and milestones in self-driving development through the racing.

Racing Categories

  • Full-sized Car Onsite Racing: Full-sized car platform and hardware are provided onsite by the Organizer. The car platform is already equipped with self-driving engineering support. You come with your self-driving software and algorithms onsite to compete on closed urban roads for self-driving skills such as obstacle avoidance and S-bend etc. (The specifications for car platform will be announced on the website so that you can have a check to see the necessity of bringing your own hardware such as sensors and processors etc. )

  • Small-sized Car Onsite Racing: You can choose to bring your own small-sized car onsite to race (as long as it is self-driving small-sized cars powered by Raspberry Pi, such as Donkey car http://www.donkeycar.com/ or use the standard small-sized car platform provided by the Organizer onsite. The racing is for Wheel to Wheel Tournament.

  • Remote Racing: Coming Soon (not released yet)

Prize Pool

  • Full-sized Car Onsite Racing: $40,000 USD
  • Small-sized Car Onsite Racing: $15,000 USD
  • Human Driver vs. AI Driver Ultimate Challenge (Full-sized Car): $100,000 USD

Sponsor Prize
Udacity Self-driving NanoDegree Programs: Worth $1000 USD each

Racing Date

  • Full-sized Car Onsite Racing: Participants arrive on May 19th, racing date is from May 20th-26th (the first five days are for installation and test)

  • Small-sized Car Onsite Racing: Participants arrive on May 24th, racing date is from May 25th-26th (the first day is for installation and test)

Racing Location
Guiyang, Guizhou, China (We’ll provide flights reimbursement and cover all the relevant costs during your stay)

DIY Robocars KuaiKai, creating an unforgettable self-driving racing experience that we all haven’t thought of yet!
Apply and check more details on the racing website page: https://www.pixmoving.com/kuaikai

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by @PIX_Moving Nancy Lee on April 11, 2018 04:20 AM

April 10, 2018
ROS Answers: kinetic uses unstable eigen3 on Ubuntu 16.04

@gavanderhoorn wrote:

I’m posting this sort-of on behalf of the poster of kinetic uses unstable eigen3 on Ubuntu 16.04 on ROS Answers, as I believe this might deserve some wider discussion and attention.

Summarising: according to the OP, Canonical is shipping an unstable version of Eigen3 with Ubuntu Xenial (16.04), which means that all of ROS Kinetic is also depending on that version. According to launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/eigen3, Xenial ships eigen3/3.3~beta1-2.

The OP has included an MWE that should show what (one of) the issue(s) is. I haven’t tried this myself (yet).

Upstream bug report is here (posted: 2018-02-21), but it doesn’t seem to get much attention.

If this is indeed an actual issue, are there any channels we could use to get some more response out of Canonical about this?

PS: I didn’t really know where to put this, so figured General was as good as any other category.

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by @gavanderhoorn gavanderhoorn on April 10, 2018 11:00 AM

April 09, 2018
About make noodles arm

@leiw wrote:

Hello,

Do someone know how to develop make noodles arm by ROS ? similar below link

Thanks

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by @leiw Wilson on April 09, 2018 02:54 AM

April 06, 2018
ROS Summer School 2018 in Aachen, Germany

@Patrick wrote:

The registration for the 7th ROS Summer School at FH Aachen, University of Applied Sciences in Germany is opened.

The event will take place from 20th August till 31st August 2018. Everyone who is interested in learning ROS is invited to register now!

In this two weeks we are handling the following topics of mobile robotics more in detail:
ROS Basics, Communication, Hardware Interfacing, Teleoperation, Transforms, Gazebo Simulation, Landmark Detection, Localization, Mapping, Navigation, Control, some Industrial exhibition and so on and so on. . . Of course all these topics can be experienced on real hardware using our mobile robots after learning the theory.

image

For more details about the contents check our Flyer or our video summary from last years ROS Summer School 2017

The seats are limited to 50 participants!

image

If this is still not enough for you, we offer an additional ROS UAV weekend afterwards from 26th to 27th of August. This will include assembling UAVs, first flight setup, flight modes, ROS interfacing, Landmark Detection and getting in touch with autonomous flying.
Detailed information can be seen on the flyer or again in our ROS Summer School video 2017

The seats here are limited to 15 participants!

Application form, more information, photos and videos can be found on our homepage.

All is organized by MASCOR. The ROS Summer School is designed to teach participants about how to get started with ROS; it is created for those who have had an interest in autonomous systems, but didn’t quite know how to get started. With that, organizers recommend students have a basic knowledge of Linux (Ubuntu) and one programming language such as Python or C++. The two-week program is made possible through Mobile Autonomous Systems and Cognitive Robotics (MASCOR).

The ROS Summer School is part of the ROSIN project. The ROSIN project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No. 732287.

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by @Patrick Patrick Wiesen on April 06, 2018 09:11 AM

April 05, 2018
New Packages for Indigo 2018-04-04

@tfoote wrote:

We’re happy to announce 4 new packages and 66 updated packages for Indigo.

There are a 10 packages removed or which have stopped building. We discussed them in this threa

Thank you to everyone who has contributed to these packages! A full listing is below.

Package Updates for indigo

Added Packages [4]:

Updated Packages [66]:

Removed Packages [10]:

  • ros-indigo-alfred-bot
  • ros-indigo-roch-capabilities
  • ros-indigo-roch-rapps
  • ros-indigo-rosjava-dynamic-reconfigure
  • ros-indigo-smarthome-common-driver
  • ros-indigo-smarthome-media-kodi-driver
  • ros-indigo-smarthome-media-onkyo-driver
  • ros-indigo-smarthome-media-samsungtv-driver
  • ros-indigo-terarangerduo
  • ros-indigo-terarangerone

Thanks to all ROS maintainers who make packages available to the ROS community. The above list of packages was made possible by the work of the following maintainers:

  • Adolfo Rodriguez Tsouroukdissian
  • Alexander Tiderko
  • Atsushi Watanabe
  • Carl
  • Dave Feil-Seifer
  • David V. Lu!!
  • Davide Faconti
  • Gayane Kazhoyan
  • Jeremie Deray
  • Kelsey Hawkins
  • Kevin Hallenbeck
  • Mikael Arguedas
  • Robert Haschke
  • Sammy Pfeiffer
  • Tim Liu

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by @tfoote Tully Foote on April 05, 2018 02:38 AM

New Packages for Kinetic 2018-04-04

@tfoote wrote:

We’re happy to announce 51 new packages 118 updated packages, and 1 removed package.

Thank you to all the maintainers who help keep making these packages available. Full details are below.

Package Updates for kinetic

Added Packages [51]:

Updated Packages [118]:

Removed Packages [1]:

Thanks to all ROS maintainers who make packages available to the ROS community. The above list of packages was made possible by the work of the following maintainers:

  • Adolfo Rodriguez Tsouroukdissian
  • Alexander Tiderko
  • Atsushi Watanabe
  • Chris Lalancette
  • David V. Lu!!
  • Davide Faconti
  • Dirk Thomas
  • Franka Emika GmbH
  • Gayane Kazhoyan
  • Jeremie Deray
  • Jorge Santos
  • Kelsey Hawkins
  • Kevin Hallenbeck
  • Michael X. Grey
  • Mikael Arguedas
  • Pyo
  • ROS Orphaned Package Maintainers
  • Robert Haschke
  • Sammy Pfeiffer
  • Sebastian Pütz
  • Thomas Le Mézo
  • Tim Liu
  • Toni Oliver
  • Vincent Rabaud

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by @tfoote Tully Foote on April 05, 2018 01:42 AM

April 04, 2018
ROS N Turtle Naming Brainstorm

@sloretz wrote:

Since the release of ROS Melodic Morenia is approaching, it is time to brainstorm the name for the N-Turtle release.

Past ROS 1 names and codenames:

  • Boxturtle – boxturtle
  • C Turtle – cturtle
  • Diamondback – diamondback
  • Electric Emys – electric
  • Fuerte – fuerte
  • Groovy Galapagos – groovy
  • Hydro Medusa – hydro
  • Indigo Igloo – indigo
  • Jade Turtle – jade
  • Kinetic Kame – kinetic
  • Lunar Loggerhead – lunar
  • Melodic Morenia – melodic

ROS 2 names and codenames

  • Ardent Apalone – ardent
  • Bouncy Bolson – bouncy

Here are some links with turtle species starting with N

As past names have shown there are no rules to this process, so be creative!

– Your friendly ROS naming committee

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by @sloretz Sloretz on April 04, 2018 10:35 PM

Vision_msgs now available in ROS Kinetic, Lunar, Melodic, and ROS2

@Kukanani wrote:

Hello ROS users,

The vision_msgs package is now released for ROS Kinetic, Lunar, and Melodic. We also plan to have a ROS2 release ready for the next sync.

We’ve noticed a lot of computer vision-related packages being built lately, and wanted to be sure that people knew about this package. We would like to standardize messages across different vision pipelines, including both new packages, and backwards-compatible upgrades to existing systems. If you’re building or maintaining a vision package and are interested in integration, please reach out and let’s make this happen!

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by @Kukanani Adam Allevato on April 04, 2018 03:57 PM


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