January 16, 2019
ROS2 Live Class: Intro to HRIM, the Hardware Robot Information Model

@TheConstruct wrote:

ROS Developers Live Class: Intro to HRIM, the Hardware Robot Information Model

  • Date&Time: January 22th, 2019 | 6pm to 7pm · CET
  • Fee: Free event
  • Registration website: http://bit.ly/2T3tTQx

About:
HRIM is a common interface for ROS2 based robot modules. Its goal is to facilitate interoperability among different vendors of robot hardware components.

By the end of this Live Class you will understand:
▸ What HRIM is
▸ Understand an example of an already created HRIM package for the MARA robot
▸ How to build a HRIM package for your own robot

Robots used in this class:

▸ For this class, we are going to use the simulation of the MARA robot. MARA is the first robot in the world which is running 100% on ROS2, developed by Acutronic Robotics. You can find more information about real robot MARA here: https://acutronicrobotics.com/products/mara/.

This Live Class is brought to you thanks to a collaboration between The Construct (http://www.theconstructsim.com) and Acutronic Robotics (https://acutronicrobotics.com/).

Instructor:

RICARDO TÉLLEZ, Ph.D.

Ricardo has 7 years experience building software for ROS based robots including human size humanoids. He is the author of 4 books about learning ROS. He teaches Robotics at the University of LaSalle for the undergraduate program and for the Master. Additionally, he delivers every Tuesday a free ROS Live Class on his Youtube channel, where attendants can learn and practice a ROS subject. He is also the conductor of the ROS Developers Podcast where he interviews every week a ROS expert about how to better program robots with ROS.

*The whole code will be provided for free to all the attendants to the class as a ROSject, containing simulation, notebook with instructions and code.

*This is a LIVE Class on how to develop with ROS. In Live Classes, you will practice with the instructor at the same time, with the provided free ROS material.

Posts: 1

Participants: 1

Read full topic

by @TheConstruct The Construct on January 16, 2019 04:08 PM

TIAGo robot ROS Tutorial 4: OpenCV

Eager to program robotics applications? TIAGo robot’s simulation is open source and is available online: even if you don’t have the platform physically, you can work with it! The simulation is perfect for enhancing your coding abilities and also for getting started in robotics. TIAGo has a set of comprehensive tutorials of all levels to download its simulation and easily develop robotics applications.

Remember you have handy resources that PAL Robotics put available:

After the Tutorial 1 (Control), Tutorial 2 (Navigation), and Tutorial 3 (MoveIt!), the fourth open-source ROS Tutorial will give you the right means to start using OpenCV on TIAGo!

Breaking news! PAL Robotics’ Open Call for loaning TIAGo Robot to teams who want to participate to the 1st SciRoc Challenge has been extended until February 1st. Interested? 👉👉👉 http://erl.pal-robotics.com/

OpenCV_robotics-vision-ros-tutorialWhat is OpenCV?

OpenCV is an open-source library on computer vision and is a helpful tool for computational efficiency with a strong focus on real-time applications. The library has more than 47 thousand users worldwide and is broadly used in the field of advanced robotics. One key point of OpenCV is its flexibility to merge with ROS (the standard middleware for all PAL Robotics’ robots) to easily create computer vision applications out of the box.

How to use OpenCV on TIAGo robot

Teach TIAGo robot how to detect and track an object, a person, a face or the environment with these selected tools available at the OpenCV library. Get started in becoming the master of Computer Vision with TIAGo robot’s ROS simulation!

Beginner Level:

  1. opencv-tiago-robot-aruco_tutorial

    TIAGo robot learning to detect fiducial markers using the ArUco library.

    Track Sequential (C++): An easy way of detecting and tracking basic movements or shapes, in a static environment. This code gives a demonstration of some basic operations within OpenCV, to implement a simple tracker based on image subtraction, thresholding, morphological operations, and blob segmentation.

  2. Corner Detection (C++): This tutorial shows how to use the Shi-Tomasi and Harris corner detector algorithms, often used in the OpenCV library, changing two simple parameters.
  3. Find Keypoints (C++/Python): In order to track objects more effectively, or against a dynamic background, a method is to detect keypoints in a static image of the target object, create a keypoint profile, and match this against a feed of images. In this tutorial, you will be able to go through most of the feature detectors of OpenCV and to see how image sharpening and contrast affects the detection of features.
  4. Matching (C++/Python): This tutorial shows how to find matches between the keypoints detected and thereby see if the image contains a certain object, by using feature detection in two images.
  5. ArUco marker detection (C++): This tutorial is about teaching TIAGo robot to detect fiducial markers using the ArUco library and to get its 3D pose.

Advanced Level:

  1. opencv-tiago-robot-person_detection_02

    Person detection.

    Person detection (C++): ROS node using the OpenCV person detector based on an Adaboost cascade of HoG.

  2. Face detection (C++) Example of ROS node embedding OpenCV’s face detector, based on an Adaboost cascade of Haar features.
  3. Planar object detection and pose estimation (C++): Planar textured object detection based on feature matching between live video feed of TIAGo and a reference image of the object. The pose of the object is determined by homography estimation and provided the size of the object.

Share your creations with us!

We would love to see your awesome ideas turned into – a simulated – reality! Share your results with us by sending them to marketing@pal-robotics.com.

Find other tutorials on Control, Navigation, MoveIt! and PCL at TIAGo’s ROS Wiki and in our blog as well.

The post TIAGo robot ROS Tutorial 4: OpenCV appeared first on PAL Robotics Blog.

by Judith Viladomat on January 16, 2019 10:14 AM

January 15, 2019
Hardware Robot Information Model (HRIM): Beriain release

@ibaiape wrote:

Dear ROS community,

Our team at Acutronic Robotics is very excited to introduce the second release (0.2.0) of HRIM: Beriain. HRIM is an information model for robot modules that focuses on hardware at the component level and aims to enable modularity and interoperability via “standardizing” data I/O amongst said components.

HRIM in itself can be separated in two concepts:

  • Definition: On one hand, we focus on developing communication models that encompass the components currently being used in the industry, categorized by their function. We need consistent yet flexible-enough models that can adapt to the individualities of different manufacturers and specific products while maintaining a homogeneous structure. You can read further on our approach for this here, and the definition and description of our models here. Basically, and as a TL;DR, we define certain common communications we deem necessary across all components (like identification, communication status…), purpose-specific capabilities all components of that subtype should have (like all cameras publishing images), and additional capabilities that each module may or may not have (like a motor providing a temperature reading).

  • Composition: On the other, we get into the composition of said models through what we refer to as the meta-model. This is a way to take the existing model definitions as the building blocks for a specific module, with specific capabilities. The meta-model aims to facilitate part of the robot development process by providing a simple interface to generate custom packages based on the capabilities of your component.

Beriain contains all the module models we’ve developed so far in a platform independent representation through XML, and the tooling to “compile” these representations into ROS 2.0’s communication artifacts. That is the main difference from the previous release, Anboto.

The meta-model has not been added to the main branch yet, as we are still considering many approaches on how to implement it. One of these approaches is available at our meta-clean branch for anyone that wants to put their hands on it.

Contributions and suggestions are very welcomed. We strongly believe our best bet to realise the potential of HRIM lies in receiving input from multiple types of profile and field, this is one of the main reasons why we decided on an open-source development. We don’t aim to become another “standard”, but to truly impact how roboticists develop new solutions and help them in the often tedious and time-consuming integration effort, plus some extras. And we know we can’t do it alone. Anyone interested is more than welcome to initiate a discussion at our issues.

Thanks a lot to ROS Industrial for believing in this project’s value and providing funding for its development.

Links of interest:

Posts: 1

Participants: 1

Read full topic

by @ibaiape Ibaiape on January 15, 2019 10:33 AM

January 14, 2019
New packages for Lunar 2019-01-14

@clalancette wrote:

We’re happy to announce the next update for ROS Lunar. We have 12 new packages as well as 44 updated packages.

As always, thanks to all of the maintainers and contributors who help make these updates possible!

Full details are below.

Package Updates for lunar

Added Packages [12]:

Updated Packages [44]:

Removed Packages [0]:

Thanks to all ROS maintainers who make packages available to the ROS community. The above list of packages was made possible by the work of the following maintainers:

  • Atsushi Watanabe
  • AutonomouStuff Software Development Team
  • Felix Ruess
  • Kei Okada
  • Kris Kozak
  • Marc Alban
  • Martin Günther
  • Max Schwarz
  • P. J. Reed
  • Philipp Schillinger
  • ROS Orphaned Package Maintainers
  • Ralf Kaestner
  • Russell Toris
  • Sammy Pfeiffer
  • Vladimir Ermakov

Posts: 1

Participants: 1

Read full topic

by @clalancette Chris on January 14, 2019 04:23 PM

January 11, 2019
ARIAC 2019 Registration Opening Soon!

@sloretz wrote:

[Please note that, due to the current partial US government shutdown, the plans laid out below are subject to change.]

We are happy to announce that registration for the Agile Robotics for Industrial Automation Competition (ARIAC) 2019 will soon be open! Qualifiers are expected to begin in early March 2019 and the final competition will be held in May 2019.

ARIAC is a simulation-based competition designed to promote agility in industrial robot systems by leveraging the latest advances in artificial intelligence and robot planning. The goal is to enable industrial robots on shop floors to be more productive, more autonomous, and more responsive to the needs of shop floor workers.

As in previous years, this is a virtual competition using the Gazebo simulator and ROS programming environment, so there is no need to have access to robot hardware or travel to compete. Winners will be determined through automated metrics and a panel of judges. The prize amounts will be announced at a future date.

More information about the 2019 competition will be made available at:

https://bitbucket.org/osrf/ariac/wiki/2019/Home.md

Please post discussion and questions on discourse https://discourse.ros.org/c/ariac-users

If you would like to ask a question privately then please email: ariac@nist.gov

Posts: 1

Participants: 1

Read full topic

by @sloretz Sloretz on January 11, 2019 10:00 PM

January 09, 2019
Tutorial Series | ROS and Raspberry Pi for Beginners | Setup Topics Nodes Launch

@tiziano_fiorenzani wrote:

ROS and Raspberry Pi Tutorial

I am new to ROS myself and in the beginning I struggled. I thought I could put my experience at good use for beginners with a video tutorial series.

I decided to go for a real example. I had my Donkey Car (donkeycar.com) parked somewhere (too many things to do) and I thought that would have been a perfect robot to start with.

This video covers (it’s long, but I wrote down the time marks in the description on YouTube):

  • setting up a Raspberry Pi 3 with an SD card image from Ubiquity Robotics, with ROS Kinetic installed.
  • installing ROS on Ubuntu
  • ROS master, ROS_MASTER_URI and ROS running on multiple platforms
  • Packages installation and creation
  • topics and messages
  • writing a script (publisher and subscriber) in Python
  • lots of fun outdoor

You are all welcome to contribute with your own packages!

CODE : Find the code on Github

CLICK HERE TO GO TO THE VIDEO ON YOUTUBE

Posts: 2

Participants: 1

Read full topic

by @tiziano_fiorenzani Tiziano Fiorenzani on January 09, 2019 06:56 PM

Announcing Official Docker Images for ROS2

@ruffsl wrote:

TL;DR: Support for ROS2 is now reflected in the Official DockerHub library! :whale:

As mentioned previously in a related post [1], work as been done in adding Docker images for ROS2 to Official Library.

With this just now up-streamed, the resulting addition of ROS2 tags are now available. To see the listing of supported suites, distros and architectures for the official DockerHub library, you can view the manifest for ROS here [2]:

In summery, multiarch (amd64, arm64v8) images for ROS2 releases (ardent, bouncy, crystal) with meta-tags (ros-core, ros-base) have been added, built from targeted Ubuntu parent images.

The latest tag was left to remain pointing to the latest ROS1 LTS available (currently melodic), presumably until a LTS distro for ROS2 is released. Tag names consisting only of the distro name istelf will continue to point to the respective ros-base meta tag, E.g:

$ docker pull ros:crystal
crystal: Pulling from library/ros:crystal-ros-base

Additionally, more meta-tags (desktop, ros1-bridge) are also available under OSRF’s own organizational ros Docker Hub repo [3].

If you find issues with the images, please be sure to ticket them here [4]:

Also don’t forget to share our official repo [5] so others might discover it!

cheers,
@ruffsl

[1] Official Docker Images for ROS2 Crystal and arm32v7
[2] https://github.com/docker-library/official-images/blob/master/library/ros
[3] https://hub.docker.com/r/osrf/ros/tags
[4] https://github.com/osrf/docker_images
[5] https://hub.docker.com/_/ros

Posts: 4

Participants: 2

Read full topic

by @ruffsl ruffsl on January 09, 2019 04:01 AM

January 07, 2019
New Packages for Kinetic 2019-01-07

@tfoote wrote:

We’re happy to announce 25 new packages and 57 updated packages for Kinetic.

Please see the full details below. And thank you to all the maintainers and contributors who have helped make these releases possible!

Package Updates for kinetic

Added Packages [25]:

Updated Packages [57]:

Removed Packages [0]:

Thanks to all ROS maintainers who make packages available to the ROS community. The above list of packages was made possible by the work of the following maintainers:

  • Alexander Tiderko
  • Atsushi Watanabe
  • AutonomouStuff Software Development Team
  • Christian Henkel
  • Daniel Zumkeller
  • Denis Štogl
  • Ed Venator
  • Felix Ruess
  • Hilario Tome
  • Jack Kilian
  • Kei Okada
  • Kevin Hallenbeck
  • Kris Kozak
  • Marc Alban
  • Matthew Tesch
  • Max Schwarz
  • Michele Colledanchise
  • Micho Radovnikovich
  • Musa Morena Marcusso Manhaes
  • Okan Aşık
  • P. J. Reed
  • Philipp Schillinger
  • ROS Orphaned Package Maintainers
  • Ralf Kaestner
  • Rohan Agrawal
  • Russell Toris
  • Sammy Pfeiffer
  • Tokyo Opensource Robotics Kyokai (TORK) Developer Team
  • Tokyo Opensource Robotics Kyokai(TORK) Developer Team
  • Vladimir Ermakov
  • Wolfgang Merkt
  • Zahi Kakish
  • davidfernandez
  • stogl

Posts: 1

Participants: 1

Read full topic

by @tfoote Tully Foote on January 07, 2019 08:10 PM

New Packages for Indigo 2019-01-07

@tfoote wrote:

We’re happy to announce 10 new packages and 57 updated packages for Indigo with our first sync of the new year.

Thank you to everyone who has helped make these packages available including both maintainers and contributors. Full details are below.

Package Updates for indigo

Added Packages [10]:

Updated Packages [57]:

Removed Packages [0]:

Thanks to all ROS maintainers who make packages available to the ROS community. The above list of packages was made possible by the work of the following maintainers:

  • Alexander Tiderko
  • Atsushi Watanabe
  • AutonomouStuff Software Development Team
  • Fadri Furrer
  • Felix Ruess
  • Kei Okada
  • Kevin Hallenbeck
  • Kris Kozak
  • Marc Alban
  • Michele Colledanchise
  • Micho Radovnikovich
  • P. J. Reed
  • Pavel Vechersky
  • Philipp Schillinger
  • Sammy Pfeiffer
  • Thach Do
  • Zahi Kakish
  • user

Posts: 1

Participants: 1

Read full topic

by @tfoote Tully Foote on January 07, 2019 08:08 PM

January 04, 2019
File naming convention "rosinstall" misleading?

@130s wrote:

(I can’t find a better channel but please feel free to move this to a more appropriate one.)

I’m wondering if using rosinstall still makes sense as the naming convention of the files that are typically passed to wstool. Reason being:

  • Those files together with wstool don’t install, instead they are used for downloading repositories IMO.
  • By wstool being ROS-independent tool, those files together with wstool can be used for downloading non-ROS repos.
  • After all, the are the files that are passed to wstool. I assume rosinstall came from the tool that was previously used.
    • So using something like “wstool” makes more sense, e.g. .wstool?

(Note: my experience is highly wstool-intensive. I’m not aware of any other active usecase of rosinstall files.)

I suggest updating documentation incl. tutorials, but the core document of his naming is REP 126. I can open an MR to update the rep that if that makes sense.
This is just about a convention so I don’t think existing usecases get affected even if we change the REP etc.

I’ve seen some experienced engineers who recently started working in ROS-related projects getting confused due to this.

Posts: 3

Participants: 3

Read full topic

by @130s Isaac I. Y. Saito on January 04, 2019 06:55 PM

ROS2 vs ROS1 ? Or more like ROS2 + ROS1?

@YUHONG_LIN wrote:

This 14th of December of 2018, ROS2 Crystal Clemmys was released officially. It’s a very important step due to the fact that it adds enough new functionality versus its prior older brother ROS2 Bouncy Bolson to be a real option to consider to make the jump from ROS1 to ROS2.

So here are some of my findings and facts about ROS2 versus ROS1. Just bear in mind that crystal is evolving really fast and it wouldn’t be a surprise that more improvements appear in the near future.

— by MIGUEL ANGEL

READ MORE: http://www.theconstructsim.com/ros2-vs-ros1/

Posts: 4

Participants: 3

Read full topic

by @YUHONG_LIN on January 04, 2019 09:08 AM

December 29, 2018
4th Robotics Craftsmanship International Academy (RobotCraft 2019)

@robotcraft_ingeniari wrote:

Are you interested in Robotics? Are you an engineering student eager to improve your technical skills? Then you should come to this Internship and Summer Course!

The call for applications for the 4th Robotics Craftsmanship International Academy (RobotCraft 2019) is now officially open!

RobotCraft is something in-between a summer camp and a collective internship promoted by Ingeniarius; a company devoted to the development of robotic solutions and other hi-tech devices, and University of Coimbra, through their Robotics Club and the Institute of Systems and Robotics. RobotCraft 2016, 2017 and 2018 received an overall number of 237 participants coming from more than 100 universities spread across more than 20 different countries.

RobotCraft is way more than the typical classroom learning or even laboratory work. The programme provides a general overview of the science and art behind robotics, teaching the basis around mechatronics, Arduino low-level programming, Robot Operating System (ROS) high-level design, and artificial intelligence, thus being divided into multiple modules, designated as crafts, carefully prepared to provide a wide range of skills and knowledge in the topic. This 4th edition has been facelifted when compared to the previous versions, with an increased focus in ROS, tackling the current academic and non-academic needs within the world of robotics.

Requirements

  • Knowledge of C/C++ programming languages.
  • Good English communication skills
  • Motivated to learn
  • Capable of working in international environment
  • Capable of working independently

Preferences

  • Knowledge of Arduino software
  • Experience in embedded system design

Qualifications

Student or recent graduate of Bachelor, Master and PhD from the following Departments:

  • Electrical Engineering
  • Electronic Engineering
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Robotics
  • Computer Engineering and Science
  • Electromechanical Engineering and such departments.

ONLINE APPLICATION FORM: robotcraft.ingeniarius.pt

For more information contact us.

Contact

Mobile Phone: +351 96 117 14 09

Email: education@my.ingeniarius.pt

Webpage: robotcraft.ingeniarius.pt

If you have any doubt about the programme, contact us or your own national contact point (NCP):
http://robotcraft.ingeniarius.pt/hub

See you next summer in Portugal!

Posts: 1

Participants: 1

Read full topic

by @robotcraft_ingeniari Daryna Datsenko on December 29, 2018 10:29 PM

December 28, 2018
New packages for Melodic 2018-12-28

@clalancette wrote:

We’re happy to announce the next update for ROS Melodic. We have 78 new packages as well as 128 updated packages.

As always, thanks to all of the maintainers and contributors who help make these updates possible!

Full details are below.

Package Updates for melodic

Added Packages [78]:

Updated Packages [128]:

Removed Packages [0]:

  • ros-melodic-moveit-experimental-dbgsym

Thanks to all ROS maintainers who make packages available to the ROS community. The above list of packages was made possible by the work of the following maintainers:

  • Alexander Rössler
  • Alexander Tiderko
  • AutonomouStuff Software Development Team
  • AutonomouStuff Software Team
  • Bence Magyar
  • Benjamin Binder
  • Chittaranjan Srinivas Swaminathan
  • Daniel Miller
  • Daniel Zumkeller
  • Dave Coleman
  • David V. Lu!!
  • Denis Štogl
  • Devon Ash
  • Enrique Fernandez
  • Fadri Furrer
  • Florian Beck
  • George Todoran
  • Ioan Sucan
  • Isaac I. Y. Saito
  • Jon Binney
  • Jonathan Binney
  • Josh Whitley
  • Kei Okada
  • Kevin Hallenbeck
  • Konstantin Schauwecker
  • Kris Kozak
  • Lukas Pfeifhofer
  • Marc Alban
  • Mark Moll
  • Markus Bader
  • Mathias Lüdtke
  • Max Schwarz
  • Michael Ferguson
  • Michael Görner
  • Michele Colledanchise
  • Micho Radovnikovich
  • Mike Lautman
  • MoveIt! Release Team
  • P. J. Reed
  • Paul Bovbel
  • Pavel Vechersky
  • Philipp Schillinger
  • Pilz GmbH and Co. KG
  • ROS Orphaned Package Maintainers
  • Raghavender Sahdev
  • Ralf Kaestner
  • Raphael Hauk
  • Ruben Smits
  • Russell Toris
  • Sammy Pfeiffer
  • Timo Röhling
  • Vladimir Ermakov
  • William Woodall
  • Wolfgang Merkt
  • Yohei Kakiuchi
  • stogl

Posts: 1

Participants: 1

Read full topic

by @clalancette Chris on December 28, 2018 04:49 PM

December 27, 2018
Announcing DDS-XRCE support for the Renesas RX65N MCU - software release

@godzilla_max wrote:

Renesas are pleased to announce the release of a DDS-XRCE implementation for RX65N MCU. It was described in the Renesas news release. This software integrates eProsima Micro-XRCE-DDS Client and communicates with the Micro-XRCE-DDS Agent. It is implemented at the top of the AWS FreeRTOS™ and has room for other embedded applications to run. Setup and demo instructions are available at the project’s GitHub repository page.

Posts: 1

Participants: 1

Read full topic

by @godzilla_max Osamu "Max" Matsushima on December 27, 2018 07:41 AM

December 26, 2018
Enjoy Gazebo&ROS Christmas Card

@Boo_Boo wrote:

hello :slight_smile: .
I am currently studying ROS and I am a fan about ROS and turtlebot.
This time I made a Christmas card using ROS and Gazebo.
I used URDF file of ROBOTIS MINI( OP2 ) and interior model of 3D ware house and Resistor Christmas model of thingiverse.
I would be very grateful if you enjoyed it.

Concept1

Concept2

Posts: 1

Participants: 1

Read full topic

by @Boo_Boo Boo Boo on December 26, 2018 06:15 PM

December 22, 2018
Webots goes open source!

@olivier.michel wrote:

Dear colleagues,

Today, after more than 20 years of proprietary licensing, Webots has become 100% free open source software, released under the terms of the Apache 2.0 license.

Binary packages:
https://cyberbotics.com

Source code (GitHub):

Announcement:
https://cyberbotics.com/doc/blog/Webots-2019-a-release

Video:

Webots is a well known robot simulator that has been continuously developed, documented, tested and used over the past 22 years and featuring a nice ROS interface on Linux, macOS and Windows. Becoming 100% free open source software, Webots is expected to be more widely adopted by the robotics research community. This will translate into more projects and more contributions: robot models, objects, environments, interfaces, controller example, tutorials, lectures, bug fixes, new features, etc.

Our business will continue to rely on Webots as we will provide the following paid services to the growing base of Webots users:

  • Webots Premier Service: yearly subscription to a first class user support hotline.
  • Consulting Services: custom development hours for Webots users.
  • Hosting online simulations, similar to robotbenchmark.net.
  • Industrial Projects: customization of the Webots software for industrial customers.
  • Research Projects: participation in research projects (including EU research projects).

We would like to thank our loyal Webots customers. The licenses fees they have paid regularly have contributed to the development and quality of this software. Without them, Webots would never have become what it is today. We will be very happy to be able to continue to support all Webots users, and to collaborate closely on specific projects.

Have a think about it, and if you see any opportunity enabled by this licensing change, please contact me directly.

Best regards,

-Olivier Michel
Cyberbotics Ltd., founder & CEO

Posts: 2

Participants: 2

Read full topic

by @olivier.michel Olivier on December 22, 2018 10:18 AM

December 20, 2018
Gazebo and more for ROS1 on Windows

@seanyen-msft wrote:

We’re excited to share you some news for ROS1 on Windows. In the past weeks, we enabled Gazebo and its ROS packages to natively run on Windows! Plus, credited to @ojura and the Cartographer team (thank you so much!), now you can run Turtlebot3 in a simulation world to explore the world with SLAM!

For the full demo, check out more on http://aka.ms/ros.

Posts: 1

Participants: 1

Read full topic

by @seanyen-msft Sean Yen [Msft] on December 20, 2018 10:40 PM

ROS-Industrial Consortium Asia Pacific Training Milestone

ROS-Industrial Consortium Asia Pacific, supported by Southwest Research Institute, has now trained more than 100 participants on ROS since its start in 2017!

On 11-13th December ROS-Industrial Consortium Asia Pacific conducted a Basic course on ROS, at the Advanced Remanufacturing and Technology Centre, Singapore. It was followed by an Advanced topic course on the 14th December.

ROS-Industrial Consortium Asia Pacific December 2018 Training - Basic Course

ROS-Industrial Consortium Asia Pacific December 2018 Training - Basic Course

The workshop was led by Dr. Joseph Polden, and the full class of 15 participants was first introduced to the fundamental concepts of the ROS architecture and package ecosystem, followed by hands-on exercises in motion planning and perception.

ROS-Industrial Consortium Asia Pacific December 2018 Training - Group Photo

ROS-Industrial Consortium Asia Pacific December 2018 Training - Group Photo

Thank you again for those of you who participated in this round of training! Please reach out to ROS-Industrial Consortium Asia Pacific (ros-i_asia@artc.a-star.edu.sg) if you have interest in signing up for our upcoming ROS training events in 2019!

by Erik Unemyr on December 20, 2018 03:40 AM

December 19, 2018
CLion plugin

@paoloach wrote:

Hi,

I made a CLion plugin that allow to create or import a ROS workspace without the need to start CLion from a console duly set, with all the IDE features available (code completion and so on)

I hope that this help to develop in a more easy way.
ROS plugin

Regards,
Paolo

Posts: 7

Participants: 3

Read full topic

by @paoloach Paolo Achdjian on December 19, 2018 06:40 PM

ROS Industrial Conference #RICEU2018

From public funding opportunities to the latest technologies in software and system integration, the combination of robotics and IT to hardware and application highlights: This year's ROS-Industrial Conference 2018 offered a varied and top-class programme to more than 150 attendees. For the sixth time already, Fraunhofer IPA organized a ROS event in Stuttgart to present the status of ROS in Europe and to discuss existing challenges.

This is the first instalment of a series of four consecutive blog posts, presenting content and discussions according to the sessions:

  1. EU ROS Updates (watch all talks in this YouTube playlist)
  2. Software and system integration
  3. Robotics meets IT
  4. Hardware and application highlights

Day 1 - Session "EU ROS Updates"

alt text

The topic of open source software for robotics was present in the media throughout the year, and announcements that companies such as Google, Amazon and Microsoft would rely on ROS made waves outside the community, too. In addition, there is a booming robotics market. Martin Hägele (Fraunhofer IPA) highlighted this in his opening talk based on current market figures and areas of application for industrial and service robotics. In this respect, it is not surprising that politics and research funding on a national and international level are becoming increasingly aware of ROS. The speakers on the first day of the conference presented the projects and activities currently underway here.

ROSIN project overview alt text

Bringing ROS into industrial application in Europe is one of the main activities of the EU project ROSIN (ROS-Industrial Quality Assured Robot Software Components) that Carlos Hernandez Corbato of TU Delft presented. This runs from 2017 to 2020 and is mainly involved in three fields:

  1. Further development of ROS components within the framework of so-called Focused Technical Projects (FTPs)
  2. Tools for software quality assurance
  3. Education activities

Applications for FTPs can still be submitted until 2020. The next cut-off date is April 5th 2019. All information on the short application process can be found here. A decisive criterion: The project provides funding for developments for which there are concrete market requirements. For this reason, the project finances one third of the software development and the applicant takes over the other two thirds.

Successful FTP examples Pilz, Nobleo, PPM and Roboception

ROSIN granted already 20 applications for FTPs and 21 more are under review. Here are four examples of successful FTPs:

For Pilz, “Industrial Trajectory Generation for MoveIt!” was granted: Most industrial robot manipulators supported in ROS come with a MoveIt! configuration. The Motion Planning plugin for RViz allows simple and visualized planning and execution of free-space motion. Planning and obstacle avoidance work mostly out-of-the-box. This FTP addresses Cartesian motion: existing libraries for Cartesian trajectory generation lacked a user-friendly interface. The FTP implements a trajectory generator with a MoveIt!-interface for easy planning and execution of Cartesian standard-paths. In addition, the blending of multiple sequential motion commands is realized.

For Nobleo Projects, “Full Coverage Path Planning and Control“ was granted: Many robotic applications need to plan a path that passes over all points of an area or volume of interest while avoiding obstacles. As soon as a path is planned, the next challenge is to control it. As neither ROS, nor ROS Industrial are currently providing needed packages incorporating this (complete) coverage path planning or trajectory tracking functionality, this FTP proposes to develop, verify and validate these packages.

For PPM, the FTP “ROSweld” was granted: It develops an innovative ROS based framework for planning, monitoring and control of multi-pass robot applications with an intuitive, user-friendly GUI. The framework is built upon components from the project partners’ previous research and existing ROS modules. ROSWELD is demonstrated by the case study in heavy, multi-pass welding.

For Roboception, the FTP “Visard4ROS” was granted: Visard4ROS will provide a ROS interface to fully exploit the capabilities of the rc_visard sensor and to easily integrate it into robotic products or research platforms. As part of the process, Visard4ROS will also provide documentation for integration of sensors with standard industrial interfaces such as GigE Vision and GenICam, plus examples and good practices for using separate libraries to build ROS-I hardware drivers.

Education activities alt text

The second goal of ROSIN are education activities. Stephan Kallweit (FH Aachen) and Jonathan Hechtbauer (Fraunhofer IPA) presented the two formats with which the project conveys ROS knowledge. One of them is the ROS-I School. It addresses university students and young professionals to get an entry to the ROS-Industrial eco-system. Its teaching concept consists of seminars, tutorials and workshops. In addition, ROSIN has founded the ROS-I Academy. It consists of a ROS-I certified engineer program to assess certain skills within the ROS-Industrial software engineering eco-system. The certified skills comprise basic knowledge in ROS-Industrial, skills in code review and specialised ROS-Industrial topics. Check out the website for upcoming events.

Quality Assurance Tools

The third main activity of the ROSIN project are measures and technologies to improve the quality of software. Adam Alami and Zhoulai Fu (IT University of Copenhagen) presented the ongoing steps. On the one hand, a process and supporting tools are developed for quality assurance, where the quality of packages can be measured, assigned and displayed. Furthermore, ownerships for QA practices, tools and infrastructure will be appointed. Furthermore, code review practices are going to be reinstituted and a code scanning method and tool will be implemented. A quality hub website is already online in order to create a source of knowledge for quality assurance. A source of collaboration for quality assurance offers this page.

Another quality improvement measure is the automated code testing. Traditional platforms are not effective enough to provide the reliability that ROS needs today as they run the same and very few test harness for many times. However, a ROS package is reliable, when it works as expected for all run-time scenarios. That is why ROSIN aims at developing a reliability-oriented testing framework that will be integrated to the ROS ecosystem.

Outlook: Further research activities thanks to RobMoSys and SeRoNet

The conference day ended with two contributions on other research projects that also rely on ROS. Dennis Stampfer (University of Applied Sciences Ulm) presented RobMoSys. It aims at coordinating the community’s efforts to realize an industry-grade software development European ecosystem that is open, sustainable and ensures industrial quality. This shall increase the scalability and quality of robotics software development, help to commoditize base functionality, such as motion control, navigation, software components of certifiable quality and achieve predictable system integration. It addresses user requirements like, among others, reduction of development time and costs, shorter time to market and safety via a model-driven approach.

Björn Kahl (Fraunhofer IPA) presented SeRoNet. This project intends to significantly simplify the design, development, and deployment of service robots in a variety of areas, from logistics, care, and healthcare to assembly support in manufacturing operations. Through an online platform, users, system integrators and component manufacturers of service robot solutions will be able to collaborate efficiently and jointly support solutions from requirements analysis to deployment. The SeRoNet platform (available from summer 2019) will bring together users and producers of robotic solutions and will create a market for service robot solutions, services and hardware as well as software components for application solutions. Both projects will publish Open Calls in 2019, for which companies involved in robotics can apply for funding.

by Thilo Zimmermann on December 19, 2018 12:18 PM

December 18, 2018
ROS 2 Crystal Clemmys Released

We're happy to announce the ROS 2 release Crystal Clemmys!

crystal.png

Check out our installation instructions and tutorials and give it a try!

We're excited to hear your feedback and the applications that this release will enable!

Our ROS 2 distros, they grow up so fast. With the release of Crystal Clemmys we also bid farewell to Ardent Apalone which will retire with 191 packages, and Crystal is debuting with almost 300 (297 to be precise)!

To get an idea of what's in this release, be sure to read the Crystal release page.

A few features and improvements we would like to highlight in this release:

Crystal Clemmys is the third ROS 2 release and will be supported with bug fixes and platform updates (particularly on rolling dependencies like Windows and MacOS) for one year with support ending in December 2019. While we do aim to keep the API as stable as possible, we can't guarantee 100% API compatibility between releases. Check the features page and ROS 2 roadmap to evaluate whether or not ROS 2 is ready to be used for your application or if you can switch from ROS 1 to ROS 2 as it will depend on the exact feature set and requirements of your use case.

As always, we invite you to try out the new software, give feedback, report bugs, and suggest features (and contribute code!): https://index.ros.org/doc/ros2/Contact

We also invite you to release your ROS 2 packages in Crystal! Here's a tutorial to do so. A huge thanks to all those who've already participated in our pre-release testing and packaging effort.

We would also like to announce the name of the next ROS 2 release scheduled for June 2019:

Dashing Diademata

Your friendly ROS 2 Team

P.S. There's still a couple of weeks left on the T-Shirt campaign.

by Tully Foote on December 18, 2018 12:16 AM

December 17, 2018
New packages for Lunar 2018-12-17

@clalancette wrote:

We’re happy to announce the next update for ROS Lunar. We have 28 new packages as well as 49 updated packages.

As always, thanks to all of the maintainers and contributors who help make these updates possible!

Full details are below.

Package Updates for lunar

Added Packages [28]:

  • ros-lunar-behaviortree-cpp: 2.4.1-0
  • ros-lunar-costmap-queue: 0.2.2-0
  • ros-lunar-dlux-global-planner: 0.2.2-0
  • ros-lunar-dlux-plugins: 0.2.2-0
  • ros-lunar-dwb-critics: 0.2.2-0
  • ros-lunar-dwb-local-planner: 0.2.2-0
  • ros-lunar-dwb-msgs: 0.2.2-0
  • ros-lunar-dwb-plugins: 0.2.2-0
  • ros-lunar-franka-description: 0.6.0-2
  • ros-lunar-global-planner-tests: 0.2.2-0
  • ros-lunar-locomotor: 0.2.2-0
  • ros-lunar-locomotor-msgs: 0.2.2-0
  • ros-lunar-locomove-base: 0.2.2-0
  • ros-lunar-nav-2d-msgs: 0.2.2-0
  • ros-lunar-nav-2d-utils: 0.2.2-0
  • ros-lunar-nav-core-adapter: 0.2.2-0
  • ros-lunar-nav-core2: 0.2.2-0
  • ros-lunar-nav-grid: 0.2.2-0
  • ros-lunar-nav-grid-iterators: 0.2.2-0
  • ros-lunar-nav-grid-pub-sub: 0.2.2-0
  • ros-lunar-robot-navigation: 0.2.2-0
  • ros-lunar-robot-self-filter: 0.1.31-0
  • ros-lunar-rosfmt: 6.0.0-0
  • ros-lunar-rqt-multiplot: 0.0.9-1
  • ros-lunar-variant: 0.1.5-0
  • ros-lunar-variant-msgs: 0.1.5-0
  • ros-lunar-variant-topic-test: 0.1.5-0
  • ros-lunar-variant-topic-tools: 0.1.5-0

Updated Packages [49]:

Removed Packages [0]:

Thanks to all ROS maintainers who make packages available to the ROS community. The above list of packages was made possible by the work of the following maintainers:

  • AutonomouStuff Software Development Team
  • AutonomouStuff Software Team
  • David V. Lu!!
  • Devon Ash
  • Franka Emika GmbH
  • Ioan Sucan
  • Isaac I. Y. Saito
  • Josh Whitley
  • Konstantin Schauwecker
  • Kris Kozak
  • Marc Alban
  • Max Schwarz
  • Michael Ferguson
  • Michele Colledanchise
  • P. J. Reed
  • Ralf Kaestner
  • Vladimir Ermakov

Posts: 1

Participants: 1

Read full topic

by @clalancette Chris on December 17, 2018 03:43 PM

[ros2arduino] 0.0.1 Released! : Arduino library for communicating with ROS2(DDS)

@Kei wrote:

Hi,

I’ve written a post about ros2arduino before.

And the 0.0.1 version of it is released!
It can be used with ROS2 Crystal Clemmys. (Previous versions are not supported)

+Update : Registration to Arduino Library Manager is completed!!

This is open source. Although we started with the initial concept, we hope to be a better library through the contributions of future users like rosserial.

Currently available boards and functions are listed below.

  • Available boards (What we’ve tested on our own)
  • Feature
    • Only one node available
    • Publisher
    • Subscriber
  • Communication
    • Serial (Only Serial instance avaliable)

Please refer to REAMDE for other development plans and detailed usage.

In addition, it is also applied to TB3 ros2 core.
You can check this in OpenCR 1.4.0 or later.

Posts: 1

Participants: 1

Read full topic

by @Kei Kei on December 17, 2018 02:50 AM

December 16, 2018
PhD/Master Internships in Robotics and Internet of Things Lab of Prince Sultan University

@Anis_Koubaa wrote:

Please disseminate to interested people

PhD/Master Internships in Robotics and Internet of Things Lab of Prince Sultan University

Job Description

For the first time, the Robotics and Internet of Things lab at Prince Sultan University offers internships for outstanding Master and PhD students interns, for a duration of one to six months, to work on robotics, IoT and deep learning projects.

The mission of the Robotics and Internet of Things lab is to develop innovative solutions for mobile robots, unmanned aerial systems, and sensor networks applications. In particular, we aim at developing protocols, services and intelligent algorithms to use these systems through the Internet while integrating them into the cloud. The objective of cloud integration is to (1) virtualize the access to these systems through abstract interfaces, (2) take advantage of cloud resources to offload computations from these systems to the cloud. We are also interested in developing deep learning solutions to analyze data collected from robots/drones/sensors in different contexts of applications, such as surveillance, people behavior monitoring, self-driving systems, disaster management, crowd management, etc.

The candidate must demonstrate to have strong technical skills and to be eager to address scientific challenges and problems, and to be very dynamic. The RIOTU Lab addresses multi-disciplinary research areas, but we particularly consider the following research priorities and interests, which include:

  • Mobile Robots
    • Multi-Robot Coordination
    • Cloud Robotics
    • Integration of Robots to Internet and Cloud
    • Robot Software Engineering
    • Robot Operating System (ROS, ROS2)
    • Computer Vision
  • Unmanned Aerial Systems
    • Remote Sensing
    • Aerial Surveillance Systems
    • Design and Control of Drones
    • Integration of UAS to Internet and Cloud
  • Internet-of-Things
    • Remote Sensing
    • Applications
    • Networking and Protocols
    • Big Data Analytics, etc.
    • LoRA-based IoT
    • Security, Trust and Privacy
    • Web Services and SOA
  • Deep Learning and Data Science
    • Self-Driving Cars
    • Convolutional Neural Networks
    • Semantic Segmentation
    • Aerial Images Analysis
    • People Behavior Analysis

The candidate must have sufficient background to work on any project in the above research interest and must demonstrate some previous experience with the related topics.

The candidate is expected to deliver at least one submission to a high quality journal as outcome of the internship.

Benefits

Successful candidates will be provided with financial support that includes hosting, accommodation and living allowance during the period of the internship by Prince Sultan University. They will have access to the excellent research facilities (robots, drones, sensors, cloud, IoT devices, printers, etc.) and resources of the RIOTU lab. The living allowance will be decided based on the scope of the project, duration, skills of the candidates, and the expected outcomes of the internship.

Skills / Job Requirements

  • Currently is a M.S. or PhD Computer Science, Computer Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Robotics or related fields
  • Excellent knowledge of programming languages (Java, Python, C,C++), …
  • Experience with one of research themes of RIOTU lab
  • Prior experience with of Linux and development on Linux systems
  • Demonstrated ability to work independently and in a team
  • Be very dynamic and self-motivated
  • Excellent writing skills of technical and research papers in English
  • Excellent spoken skills in English
  • Excellent communication skills and a proven ability to deliver on challenging software development tasks

Recommended Skills

Deep Learning, TensorFlow, Keras, Robot Operating System (ROS), OpenCV, GPU programming,

Additional Information

Duration: 1-6 months

Starting Date

Position is available starting from January 2019. Applications will be open until otherwise notified.

How and what to apply?

To apply for a Master level internship, you must be already pursing Master studies or already having a Master degree in Computer Science, Computer Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Software Engineering or related fields.

To apply for a PhD level internship, you must be already pursing PhD studies in Computer Science, Computer Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Software Engineering or related fields.

To submit your application, Fill in the application form

In case your application has interest to us, we will contact you to send complementary documents, including CV, and expected research plan.

In case your application is not positive, you will not receive a feedback from us.

Robotics and Internet of Things Lab Overview

RIOTU Lab is a leading research at Prince Sultan University with several active researchers and students. The Robotics and Internet-of-Things research lab focuses on the integration of robots into the Internet of Things to promote new types of applications that leverage the use of these two technologies. RIOT has a long expertise in developing solutions for Internet-of-Things and Mobile Robots. The research lab also fosters its activities to be aligned with national priorities in particular the 2020 National Transformation Plan and 2030 Vision. In particular, with a strategic vision for the future, RIOT is working in emerging topics such as:

  • Software Engineering for Cloud Robotics
  • Big data analytics for IoT and Robotics applications
  • Security and safety of drones
  • Integration of robots/drones into the IoT and the Cloud
  • Communication and Networking for the IoT
  • AI Algorithms for Planning in Robotics
  • Design of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) and their applications

For more details: http://riotu.psu.edu.sa/

University Overview

Prince Sultan University is a private non-profit university in Saudi Arabia to have been awarded ACCREDITATION by the NCAAA (National Commission for Assessment & Academic Accreditation). Further, it is the youngest university to have achieved such a milestone.

Prince Sultan University emphasizes excellence in teaching, research and community services. This commitment is best exemplified by PSU’s renowned “Education for Employment” program as well as our contracted initiatives with several governmental agencies and private companies in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

Prince Sultan University strives to promote its research impact and is looking for talented researchers to join and contribute to raise the research productivity at the University.

Posts: 1

Participants: 1

Read full topic

by @Anis_Koubaa Anis Koubaa on December 16, 2018 11:23 AM

December 15, 2018
ROS 2 Crystal Clemmys Released!

@nuclearsandwich wrote:

We’re happy to announce the ROS 2 release Crystal Clemmys!

Check out our installation instructions and tutorials and give it a try!

We’re excited to hear your feedback and the applications that this release will enable!

Our ROS 2 distros, they grow up so fast. With the release of Crystal Clemmys we also bid farewell to Ardent Apalone which will retire with 191 packages, and Crystal is debuting with almost 300 (297 to be precise)!

To get an idea of what’s in this release, be sure to read the Crystal release page.

A few features and improvements we would like to highlight in this release:

Crystal Clemmys is the third ROS 2 release and will be supported with bug fixes and platform updates (particularly on rolling dependencies like Windows and MacOS) for one year with support ending in December 2019. While we do aim to keep the API as stable as possible, we can’t guarantee 100% API compatibility between releases. Check the features page and ROS 2 roadmap to evaluate whether or not ROS 2 is ready to be used for your application or if you can switch from ROS 1 to ROS 2 as it will depend on the exact feature set and requirements of your use case.

As always, we invite you to try out the new software, give feedback, report bugs, and suggest features (and contribute code!): https://index.ros.org/doc/ros2/Contact

We also invite you to release your ROS 2 packages in Crystal! Here’s a tutorial to do so. A huge thanks to all those who’ve already participated in our pre-release testing and packaging effort.

We would also like to announce the name of the next ROS 2 release scheduled for June 2019:

Dashing Diademata

Your friendly ROS 2 Team

P.S. There’s still a couple of weeks left on the T-Shirt campaign.

Posts: 5

Participants: 3

Read full topic

by @nuclearsandwich Steven! Ragnarök on December 15, 2018 01:14 AM


Powered by the awesome: Planet