June 22, 2018
New Packages for Kinetic 2018-06-22

@tfoote wrote:

We have 34 new packages and 54 updated packages for Kinetic. We’re now over 2000 packages released into Kinetic!

Thank you to all the contributors and maintainers who have helped make this sync happen!

Full details are below:

Package Updates for kinetic

Added Packages [34]:

Updated Packages [54]:

Removed Packages [0]:

Thanks to all ROS maintainers who make packages available to the ROS community. The above list of packages was made possible by the work of the following maintainers:

  • Atsushi Watanabe
  • Christian Arndt
  • Christoph Rösmann
  • David V. Lu!!
  • Felix Endres
  • Francisco Suarez-Ruiz
  • John Hsu
  • Jonathan Bohren
  • Jose Luis
  • Jose Luis Blanco Claraco
  • Jose Luis Rivero
  • Jose-Luis Blanco-Claraco
  • Kevin Hallenbeck
  • Konstantin Schauwecker
  • Markus Bader
  • Micho Radovnikovich
  • Randoms
  • Sammy Pfeiffer
  • Tokyo Opensource Robotics Kyokai (TORK) Developer Team
  • Tony Baltovski
  • Xie fusheng
  • jordan

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by @tfoote Tully Foote on June 22, 2018 06:42 PM

New Packages for Indigo 2018-06-22

@tfoote wrote:

We’re happy to announce another batch of packages for Indigo. We have 14 new packages and 26 updated packages.

Thank you to everyone who has contributed to these updates!

Full details are below:

Package Updates for indigo

Added Packages [14]:

Updated Packages [26]:

Removed Packages [0]:

Thanks to all ROS maintainers who make packages available to the ROS community. The above list of packages was made possible by the work of the following maintainers:

  • Atsushi Watanabe
  • David V. Lu!!
  • Felix Endres
  • Francisco Suarez-Ruiz
  • Jonathan Bohren
  • Kevin Hallenbeck
  • Micho Radovnikovich
  • Sammy Pfeiffer
  • Tokyo Opensource Robotics Kyokai (TORK) Developer Team

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by @tfoote Tully Foote on June 22, 2018 06:37 PM

June 19, 2018
ROS Answers needs your help

@gavanderhoorn wrote:

Or to be more specific: all of us posting on ROS Answers need your help.

Why?

Not counting the duplicates and the ones that are easy to answer (“did you source setup.bash?”, “No, pkg X is not released into ROS version Y”), I easily see a hundred new questions on ROS Answers each week.

While many are about installation, deployment or integration issues, the ones that make ROS Answers really worth the time are those that ask about advice on configuration of specific packages. How to tune the PIDs on a ros_control based driver fi, what sensors to choose for robot_localization in an underground cave or whether a 2D navigation stack can actually be used by a 6D drone “if I only fly it in a single plane”.

A large number of volunteers from the community help out by answering quite a few of these questions, or at least try to help getting closer to a solution – and they deserve a lot of recognition and thanks for that. I’ve noticed however somewhat of a decline in the number of interactions of what I would call topic experts with the ROS Answers community: users that have extensive experience with specific functionality such as mapping, localisation, motion planning, application design, human-robot interaction, behaviour modelling, system architecture, high-volume datastream processing, multi-robot systems, etc.

It’s exactly those kinds of interactions that make ROS Answers an invaluable resource, and it would be unfortunate if we lose that.

This post is therefore a call to action (or perhaps even a call to participate): if you have experience with one or more packages and you feel you could help out a fellow ROS user that is perhaps just starting out, take 15 minutes at the end or start of your day to check whether there are any questions you could contribute to.

Even a short comment pointing the poster in the right direction has the potential to save someone hours of debugging or searching. Don’t understimate how much you can help someone, even if you feel you are not a “ROS expert” (whatever that may mean).

And if you’re just starting out yourself, you could consider ROS Answers a good way to get familiar with ROS: pick a question and try to figure out what the answer could be. I’ve learned quite a few interesting things about ROS that way which I would not have known otherwise.

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by @gavanderhoorn gavanderhoorn on June 19, 2018 04:35 PM

New ROS MOOC from Delftx (TUDelft-edX) for beginner level ROS1 Users

@mbharatheesha wrote:

Dear All,

I am pleased to announce a new ROS MOOC, Hello (Real) World with ROS), that is going online from 5th September 2018 on the edX online learning platform.

You can enrol now at the Course Webpage for a fun ROS learning journey!

This course is a part of the educational activities of the EU project ROSIN and the TU Delft Online Learning School.

The target audience for the course are beginner level ROS1 users. The course will be instructor paced and of 6 weeks duration. A study/work load of about 8-12 hours per week is expected.

See you online from September 5th!

On behalf of the Delftx ROS MOOC team,
Mukunda Bharatheesha

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by @mbharatheesha Mukunda on June 19, 2018 08:23 AM

Automatica 2018: Four areas where “cobots” fit in Industry

Automatica 2018, the fair where Industry 4.0 takes shape, seems to have clear that the “Factory of the Future” involves collaborative robotics. The so-called “cobots are based on the fact that they share the same workspace as operators – meaning, they can work safely around (and also with) people, without needing any cage or partition in between.

“Cobots” of all kinds are already assisting workers undertaking multiple tasks in production lines to optimize workflows. How are they exactly fitting in industrial processes and assembly chains?

Four robots from PAL Robotics, including “cobots” and humanoids, will be at Automatica 2018 starting tomorrow. Find them at the Service Robots Demo Park and at the stand B4.523 (in front) showing diverse roles they can have in the industry, helping in areas like intralogistics, Human-Robot collaboration, and stock-taking. Here’s a glimpse on the areas where they can assist:

1) Smart Intralogistics

 

tiago-base-logistics-automatica-2018-cobot

TIAGo Base with a mounted accessory that improves usability and gives a wider 3D perception.

Carrying load from one place to another can take up valuable time that could be better spent on more relevant tasks. At the end of the year, the amount of time aimed for internal deliveries is significant, and here’s where TIAGo Base comes in to deliver materials and make work easier for operators.

TIAGo Base can adapt to any specific industrial setting with customized add-ons that are easily integrated on top. A new accessory built upon TIAGo Base will be presented at Automatica, which widens its 3D perception and improves usability for autonomous intra-logistics tasks. The cobot’s smartness comes from combining an autonomous behavior software to the existing ERP system, which helps the robot react fast when the routine is modified.

 

TIAGo-PAL-Robotics-cobot-automatica-2018

TIAGo robot learns all the movements that the worker is teaching by simply guiding the arm, which is in gravity compensation mode.

2) Human-Robot Collaboration

TIAGo combines perception, navigation, and manipulation to provide a dynamic approach of Human-Robot collaboration in production lines. TIAGo is able to either take on autonomous assignments or assist workers.

The “cobot” is fully integrated to adapt to a diverse amount of tasks and has mounting ports for extra tools, sensors or end-effectors. From pick&place to line loading, polishing or quality inspection, TIAGo flexibly undertakes the task that best helps production.

 

3) Exhaustive Stocktaking

StockBot-vision-pal-robotics-automatica-2018

StockBot vision system enables to perform planogram checking, price checking or the analysis of products’ visibility in retail.

Whether inventory control is desired in the static environment of a warehouse or the constant unpredictability of brick and mortar, StockBot is a valuable source of updated stock data. It crafts a 3D map of everything in a given space that helps in optimizing stocktaking and inventory management.

With the latest upgrade, StockBot adds vision cameras to RFID and autonomous navigation. The outcome is fast restocking, misplacement detection and management decisions that can aid in the visibility of products and their prices. Remember how StockBot works here.

 

4) Looking at the Future: Research on Humanoids

reem-c-pal-robotics-whole-body-control

REEM-C humanoid robot with a Whole-Body Control application.

The 1.65m tall bipedal platform, REEM-C, is being used in the research fields of service and collaborative robots. Active research is being conducted to improve such technologies for service and industrial tasks.

As a humanoid robot, REEM-C can walk and interact with our biped world – everything that surrounds us has been designed to fit our bipedal body. At Automatica, PAL Robotics will run a Whole-Body Control application that enables it to adapt its body and balance toward external stimuli.

 

RobMoSys at the Automatica Forum

“RobMoSys: Why the future belongs to model-driven robot programming”, under this title, Professor Herman Bruyninckx, KU Leuven, and Francesco Ferro, CEO of PAL Robotics and euRobotics board director, will give a keynote on the RobMoSys EU project. Save the date: Friday, June 22, 2018, 11:00-11:30.

 

We look forward to seeing you at Automatica!

The post Automatica 2018: Four areas where “cobots” fit in Industry appeared first on PAL Robotics Blog.

by Judith Viladomat on June 19, 2018 07:29 AM

June 18, 2018
ROS Bouncy Bolson Tshirts Available!

@tfoote wrote:

Get your ROS Bouncy Bolson Tshirt or Hoodie!

Ordering will be open until June 9th. Order now!

With each release of ROS we have a tradition of having a logo and making t-shirts. ROS Bouncy Bolson is coming out soon! To let you show your ROS colors and support this tradition, we have setup a Teespring Campaign in both the US and the EU. Note that both these campaigns can ship worldwide.

Since this is the first public announcement, here’s the full graphic for Bouncy Bolson.

Thanks to everyone who’s been helping prepare the Bouncy release. We’re looking forward to the release this month. The shirts are expected to arrive in July.

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by @tfoote Tully Foote on June 18, 2018 10:44 PM

ROSCon 2017: SLAM on TurtleBot2 using ROS2 -- Chris Lalancette (Open Robotics)

Looking foward to ROSCon 2018 we're highlighting presentations from last year. The ROSCon 2018 registration is currently open. As well as the Call for Proposals.

To show a real system running ROS Chris shows how ROS2 can be used to implement SLAM on a TurtleBot2.

Video

Abstract

This talk will focus on a larger application written entirely in ROS2. The application is a SLAM system (Google Cartographer) running on a Turtlebot2 using all underlying ROS2 components. The talk will describe the hardware and software setup of the robot, as well as porting and other challenges encountered while developing the application.

Slides

View the slides here

by Tully Foote on June 18, 2018 07:04 PM

Announcing Cartographer Stable Release (v1.0.0)

@Christoph_Schutte wrote:

We are happy to announce the first stable open source release of Cartographer 1.0, a real-time, 2D and 3D SLAM library with ROS support.

Since its original unstable release in October, 2016, the Cartographer team at Google and the open-source community have worked together, relentlessly fixing bugs, adding new features, and refining the code base. With the recent stabilization of the serialization format and public API, the community felt that a 1.0 release is now due.

We still see this as only the beginning. The focus of the Cartographer project has always been to advance and democratize SLAM as a technology. Through continued development and community contributions, we hope to add new features, such as TSDF support, as well as advance recently added features, such as distributed mapping and landmark support.

Thanks to the team at OSRF, Cartographer 1.0 is available as a binary package in the ROS Melodic release.

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by @Christoph_Schutte Christoph Schütte on June 18, 2018 06:14 PM

New Ubiquity Robotics Ubuntu+ROS Raspberry Pi Image (3B+ Support)

@rohbotics wrote:

Available here https://downloads.ubiquityrobotics.com/pi.html

The image comes with Ubuntu 16.04 (LXDE), and ROS Kinetic, and is designed to run headless.

We thought that this image would be useful for many of you who are working on robots with Raspberry Pi’s.

Rohan

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by @rohbotics Rohan Agrawal on June 18, 2018 05:33 PM

June 17, 2018
New Packages for Lunar 2018-06-17

@marguedas wrote:

We’re happy to announce the availability of 22 new packages and 21 updated packages for ROS Lunar.

As always thank you to all the maintainers who are making these releases as well as all the contributors who have helped contribute to these releases. Full details are below.

Package Updates for lunar

Added Packages [22]:

Updated Packages [21]:

Removed Packages [0]:

Thanks to all ROS maintainers who make packages available to the ROS community. The above list of packages was made possible by the work of the following maintainers:

  • Alessandro Tondo
  • Atsushi Watanabe
  • AutonomouStuff Software Team
  • Christoph Rösmann
  • John Hsu
  • Jonathan Bohren
  • Jose Luis Rivero
  • Konstantin Schauwecker
  • Sammy Pfeiffer
  • Vladimir Ermakov

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by @marguedas Mikael Arguedas on June 17, 2018 08:30 PM

June 15, 2018
A brief report from the ROS-Industrial EU Spring workshop

Thanks to the participation of several members of the ROS-Industrial community in Europe and of new participants interested in knowing more on the topic, we are happy to report on a successful ROS-Industrial EU Spring’18 Workshop at Fraunhofer IPA.

During the two days of May 28-29, organizations within the ROS-Industrial consortium had the opportunity to present their current development projects to an audience of technical experts.

Erle Robotics, represented by Irati Zamalloa, presented the concept of a common interface for the description of robot modules and hardware sub-components allowing their reusability, composability and interoperability. The project is already publicly available as a ROS2.0 implementation. During the ensuing Q&A, feedback from participants pointed to the possibility of integrating such effort with a MDE approach, where the information could be semantically annotated and verified. Further feedback is welcome, with a github repository setup for the purpose.

DSC_0002.JPG

The second workshop session focused on ways to make ROS-based systems and PLCs interoperable. Sebastian Friedl from the University of Stuttgart gave an introduction to the OPC-UA architecture and the improvements that his institution is making on this open source implementation of the protocol. He also presented the ROS <-> OPC-UA gateway that is under development within the SeRoNet project.

On a similar topic, Tiago Pinto from INESC TEC continued the session showing how his team approaches communication between CODESYS and ROS systems. The implemented wrapper is already being used for practical application within the project ScalABLE 4.0, with source code scheduled for public release in August.

DSC_0004.JPG

Wrapping up the topic, Ludovic Delval from Faunhofer IPA presented a survey of the existing ROS drivers implementations supporting different fieldbus protocols. The detailed overview was appreciated by the participants and is available as reference here.

As part of the efforts of the ROSIN project to make ROS-Industrial better and business-friendlier, partners of the consortia joined for the second day of the workshop to show the tools developed for the quality assurance on the ROS software development. Jonathan Hechtbauer from Fraunhofer IPA and Anthony Remazeilles from Tecnalia gave an update of the software efforts like the improvements on the quality badge, the rosinstall time machine tool, and a generator for ROS packages. Preliminary code is available at the github organization of the project.

Concluding the event, the ROSIN coordinator Carlos Hernández Corbato informed the audience about the opportunities for ROSIN Focused Technical Projects. A grant up to 100K to fund your software development is available to institutions with a legal seat in the EU and associated countries. The application process is explained in detail at the project page.

Given the request from interested parties who could not join us in Stuttgart, we made the content and slides of this workshop publicly available under the following link.

We look forward to a second edition of the workshop in the fall!

by Mirko Bordignon on June 15, 2018 12:40 PM

June 14, 2018
[meetings] ROS Developers Conference 2018

@YUHONG_LIN wrote:

CALL FOR PARTICIPATION : ROS Developers Conference 2018


RDC2018 - ROS Developers Conference: A practical online ROS conference for ROS developers worldwide
DATE: July 7-8, 2018
WEBSITE: http://www.rosdevcon.com

[ OVERVIEW ]

The ROS Developers Online Conference will be held from July 7 to Jul 8, 2018. This is a completely practical conference for ROS developers. The conference aims to connect ROS developers around the world without geographical restrictions and to advance ROS levels through real-time practice.

We will host eight top ROS developers to give tutorials of real ROS projects: during the conference, all participants will program together the projects at the same time with the speaker.

  • All the participants will have to practice at the same time with the speaker along the conference.
  • No installation of anything required. Only require a computer and internet connection. Any type of computer will work.
  • All the participants will have full access to the ROS development studio for programming
  • All participants will receive a pdf document with all the steps described during the conference
  • All the participants will receive a copy of the ROS Developers Guide e-book.
  • Each speech will be 30 minutes plus 10 minutes Q&A.

[ SPEAKERS ]

DAY 1 (7 July):
15:00 CEST - Roman Navarro - Learning How to Map, localize and navigate with wheeled robots
16:00 CEST - James Carrol and Ajay Sona - Using ROS to teach undergraduate robotics courses
18:00 CEST - Anis Koubaa - ROSLink: Connecting ROS-enabled Robots to the Internet-of-Things and Clouds

DAY 2 (8 July):
08:00 CEST - Enrico Mingo - How to use OpenSoT planning & Ctrl with ROS for humanoid robots
09:00 CEST - Alessio Capitanelli - Semantic Knowledge Representation in ROS
10:00 CEST - Abhimanyu Dhawan - Simple warehouse inventory detection Robot using Visual States diagrams
11:00 CEST - The Construct - OpenAI + Gazebo + ROS

[ ORGANIZERS ]

The Construct (http://www.theconstructsim.com/)
You can contact us with questions and doubts here: info@rosdevcon.com

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by @YUHONG_LIN on June 14, 2018 03:36 PM

Announcing the tensorflow_ros package: the easy way to get to C++ Tensorflow API in ROS

@peci1 wrote:

We needed to execute some pretrained Tensorflow models in C++ on our robot, and found this task to be pretty difficult to get it right. For Python inference, it’s just <depend>python-tensorflow-pip</depend> and that’s it.

So we wrote a support package tensorflow_ros_cpp which is a facade hiding the complicated stuff and allowing you to “just” <depend>tensorflow_ros_cpp</depend> and that’s it. An example of use is shown in package tensorflow_ros_test.

The package supports several ways of Tensorflow installation:

  • It can “steal” from the files installed by Python’s pip, so just installing Tensorflow via pip is enough to get the C++ API! (though it has some problems on newer systems).
  • It supports tensorflow_catkin
  • It supports custom builds using bazel

The good thing is that by depending on tensorflow_ros_cpp you don’t force users of your package into any specific kind of Tensorflow installation, he can freely choose, and your code stays the same (again, except for the systems with C++ ABI problems).

By nature of this package, it will never be distributed as a binary package, it always needs to be compiled from source.

Let us know if you find it useful!

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by @peci1 Martin Pecka on June 14, 2018 03:06 PM

June 13, 2018
ROS Transforms (TF) Part 1: An Introduction

At BLUEsat UNSW, the Off-World Robotics Software Team uses the Robotics Operating System (ROS) as the basis for much of our code. The modularity, communications framework, and existing packages it provides are all factors in this, but another key benefit is its “transform” system. The transform library, which is often referred to as “tf”, provides a standardised way of managing the position of your robot[s] in a ROS system, as well as the moving components of said robots and features in the environment. This article is the first of a series that will introduce you to ROS tf.

The tf system operates by providing a tree of co-ordinate systems, called “frames”. Each frame is an independent co-ordinate system, with an origin that can move relative to its parent in the tree. A common example of this is localising a robot to its environment. To do this you would need at least two frames: one frame for your robot’s local area – lets call it “map”, and another for your robot itself – lets call it “base_link”. In order for ROS tf to localise your robot on the map we need to publish a transform between the “map” and “base_link” frames. Such a transform will often be published by a SLAM package such as hector_slam or an EKF package such as that provided in the ROS navigation packages.

BLUEsat's BLUEtongue Rover represented as a 3D model in RViz with each transform being marked by a set of axes.ROS’s RViz tool can be used to display 3D representations of your transform tree. Here we see the BLUEtongue Rover with each set of axes representing a transform in our tree.

For every link in the tree we need to provide ROS with a “transform”, that defines the relative position of the two frames. This is where ROS’s modularity kicks in, as you are not restricted to a single node publishing all of your transforms. Instead, as with normal ROS topics, you can have many nodes providing different transforms! This means that you could have one node publishing your robot’s position in your map co-ordinate system, and another node handling the rotation of your rover’s arm. ROS tf then puts these together for you, so that you could, for example, calculate the location for the end of your arm in the map co-ordinate system.

Transforms are time stamped which means that nodes can deal with temporary data loss or lag and do accurate mapping calculations. It also means that they can be recorded with rosbag for future playback. However the time-stamping can also create some issues, which I shall talk about later in the article.

The Justification for ROS TF

So why is this useful? Say I have a LIDAR on a gimbal, and I need to know the positions of its point cloud relative to my rover’s centre of mass. But the LIDAR only publishes a plain of point information relative to its own position. Furthermore the angle of the gimbal is controlled by a separate system, to the one publishing the LIDAR data. Sound familiar?

In a traditional solution the code that reads the LIDAR data, must be aware of the position of the gimbal and manually transform its output to its desired co-ordinate system. This means that the gimbal must know to provide that data, and your system must have a way of syncing the timing of the inputs.

In ROS all of this work is done for you: the LIDAR driver publishes a header indicating that it is in a co-ordinate system who’s parent is the top of the gimbal, and the instant the data was recorded at. The system responsible for controlling the gimbal publishes a transform, indicating its position at that instant. And any system that needs the two pieces of data in a common co-ordinate system, such as that of the base of the rover, can simply run the data through a standard filter provided by ROS to get the information it needs. The video below shows our original BLUEtongue 1.0 Mars Rover doing exactly that.

Admittedly if only one system is using those two pieces of data there may not be a massive advantage, but imagine if you had many sensors on top of the gimbal, or many separate systems controlling moving parts…

The Transform Tree

As mentioned previously ROS transforms exist in a tree structure. This has some important implications for how we can structure our graph. The first of these is that a transform can only have one parent. So ROS tf won’t solve more complex graphs. This is especially relevant if you are using something like ROS’s Joint State Publisher to publish the position of joints on your robot as ROS won’t do calculations for multi-link joints. You’ll need to do that yourself.

It also means that if one link in your tree fails you won’t be able to do transforms across that gap as there is no redundancy. However, the system is reasonably resilient. You can do a transform between any two connected points, even if the rest of the graph is not fully connected.

Part of the BLUEtongue 2.0 Rover's Transform (TF) Tree in ROS's RQT tool. ROS tfPart of the BLUEtongue 2.0 Mars Rover’s Transform (TF) Tree displayed in ROS’s RQT tool.

As well as resilience, the tf tree does offer several advantages. As it’s a tree, each node only needs to know about the two co-ordinate frames it is publishing between; dramatically reducing the complexity of any publisher. This is especially useful in a distributed system with many moving parts, or even a ROS environment with multiple robots!  Furthermore if you follow ROS conventions for naming your frames you can easily combine 3rd party tools, such as one of the many ROS packages used for localisation or calculating the position of your robots joints, without having to modify them in any way.

The Timing Problem

I’d be amiss if I didn’t mention that the ROS tf system is not without its issues and difficulties. Foremost of these is ensuring that you have the transforms you need when you need them. Normally any data you want to transform will have a standard ROS header as part of its message. This header not only identifies the frame, but also the time the data was received. Lets look at our example with the LIDAR gimbal to see why this is important. In that scenario, by the time the LIDAR data  is ready to publish on our ROS network, the gimbal would have moved on. However, we want to do our transforms using the position at the time the data was collected. The timestamp allows us to do this.

But, unsurprisingly, ROS only keeps a limited buffer of transforms in memory. This can cause problems if one of your transform publishers suffers from lag, or your data takes a long time to process before a transformation is applied. Usually your system will need to be able to cope with dropping frames of data, although there are other ways to handle this that I will discuss later in the series.

Next Steps

Well that’s it for now. I hope the first part of this guide to the ROS tf system has proven useful to you! Keep an eye on our blog for my next article, where I’ll be looking at tools and libraries provided by ROS that take advantage of the tf system. In the meantime you may want to take a look at our guide to ROS debugging, which introduces some of the tools we are going to be looking at, or if you are feeling impatient you can skip ahead and look at the official tutorials. If you are interested in learning more about the robotics we do at BLUEsat UNSW you could also take a look at the Off-World Robotics page.

The post ROS Transforms (TF) Part 1: An Introduction appeared first on BLUEsat UNSW.

by Harry J.E Day on June 13, 2018 07:03 AM

June 12, 2018
Call for participation: financial support for ROS(-I) projects available (ROSIN)

@gavanderhoorn wrote:

Have a good idea for a ROS/ROS-Industrial related project? Want to work on ROS(-I) software components, documentation, standardisation or a related topic?

The EU H2020 ROSIN project has the goal to advance open-source robot software for industry and the robotics community as a whole. One of the main activities of the project is a grant program with a total amount of 3+ Million EUR for Focused Technical Projects (FTPs) on ROS software development.

If you or your company are located within the European Union, then submit an FTP proposal and apply for a ROSIN grant by following the steps outlined in the applicants guide.

FTP proposals may be submitted all year long but are evaluated every three months.

The next cut-off date is: June 15, 2018 (end of this week).

To submit your FTP, please visit rosin-project.eu/ftps.

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by @gavanderhoorn gavanderhoorn on June 12, 2018 07:06 PM

New packages for Melodic 2018-06-12

@clalancette wrote:

We’re happy to announce the first update for ROS Melodic. We have 58 new packages as well as 114 updated packages.

As always, thanks to all of the maintainers and contributors who help make these updates possible!

Full details are below.

Package Updates for melodic

Added Packages [58]:

Updated Packages [114]:

Removed Packages [0]:

Thanks to all ROS maintainers who make packages available to the ROS community. The above list of packages was made possible by the work of the following maintainers:

  • Adolfo Rodriguez Tsouroukdissian
  • Alessandro Tondo
  • Andy Zelenak
  • Armin Hornung
  • Atsushi Watanabe
  • Austin Hendrix
  • AutonomouStuff Software Development Team
  • AutonomouStuff Software Team
  • Ben Charrow
  • Bence Magyar
  • Benjamin Binder
  • Brice Rebsamen
  • Chittaranjan Srinivas Swaminathan
  • Chris Lalancette
  • Christoph Sprunk
  • D. Hood
  • Daniel Stonier
  • Dave Coleman
  • Dave Hershberger
  • David Gossow
  • Denis Štogl
  • Dirk Thomas
  • Ed Venator
  • Edmond DuPont
  • Elliot Johnson
  • Felix Ruess
  • George Todoran
  • Ingo Luetkebohle
  • Ioan Sucan
  • Isaac I. Y. Saito
  • Jack O’Quin
  • Jiri Horner
  • John Hsu
  • Jon Binney
  • Jonathan Binney
  • Jose Luis Rivero
  • Jose-Luis Blanco-Claraco
  • Julius Kammerl
  • Kevin Hallenbeck
  • Konstantin Schauwecker
  • Kris Kozak
  • Louise Poubel
  • Maciej ZURAD
  • Marc Alban
  • Markus Bader
  • Martin Günther
  • Mathias Lüdtke
  • Mathieu Labbe
  • Max Schwarz
  • Michael Ferguson
  • Michael Görner
  • Mikael Arguedas
  • Mike Purvis
  • P. J. Reed
  • Paul Bovbel
  • Pyo
  • Raphael Hauk
  • Roberto G. Valenti
  • Ruben Smits
  • Sachin Chitta
  • Scott Niekum
  • Steven! Ragnarök
  • Stuart Glaser
  • The Cartographer Authors
  • Timo Roehling
  • Tom Moore
  • Tully Foote
  • Vincent Rabaud
  • Vincent Rousseau
  • Vladimir Ermakov
  • William Woodall
  • Younghun Ju
  • rohan

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by @clalancette Chris on June 12, 2018 01:59 PM

June 11, 2018
ROSCon 2017: RoboWare: A "Product Oriented Design" IDE for ROS developers -- Tony B Wang and Jeff Gao (Jinan Tony Robotics)

Looking foward to ROSCon 2018 we're highlighting presentations from last year. The ROSCon 2018 registration is currently open. As well as the Call for Proposals.

Tony Wang and Jeff Gao present the motivation and design behind RoboWare. As well as an overview of how you can leverage RoboWare to develop ROS robots quickly.

Video

Abstract

RoboWare is a development kit specifically designed for ROS. It provides an integrated development environment, which has general purpose IDE functions? code editing, building and debugging; It fully supports ROS, including the creation and management of workspace, packages, libraries, nodes, msg/srv/action/launch/yaml/urdf files, etc. RoboWare supports "POD (Product Oriented Design)" development, it has a graphical designer for robot hardware architecture, the design diagram can be automatically exported as a ROS workspace for further development. It also provides a GUI development framework, which has plenty of robot-related controls and is cross-platform

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by Tully Foote on June 11, 2018 09:22 PM

ROSCon 2018 Talk Idea Brainstorm

@tfoote wrote:

ROSCon 2018 will be happening in Madrid in September. The call for proposals has been posted. The deadline is on July 3rd, now just under a month away! Our first submissions have started coming in. If you’d like to propose a talk but aren’t sure what to talk about this thread is for you.

Talking at ROSCon can be very rewarding way to share your expertise and knowledge with the greater community. However, putting in a proposal to ROSCon can sometimes be intimidating because you don’t know if there are people in the community who are interested in what you’re doing.

To that end I’d like to kick off a brainstorming thread here on topics that people would like to see presented at ROSCon. Even if you won’t be able to make it to ROSCon feel free to suggest a topic: we record all videos and post them online. All of the previous years talks are linked to from the programs (2017, 2016, 2015, 2014, 2013, 2012). With people sharing topics that they would like to learn more about I hope their posts here will inspire more people to submit talks. We have a large and diverse community and want everyone to consider sharing what they’re working on.

Note that this thread is meant to be inspiration for submissions and will not be part of the Program Committee’s review process.

Please reply to this thread to share the sort of talk that you’d like to see someone present at ROSCon this September.

Guidelines:

  • This is a brainstorming session.
    • Be positive.
    • There are no wrong answers. Please don’t critique others’ responses, but build upon them.
  • Keep the ideas high level.

Posts: 11

Participants: 11

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by @tfoote Tully Foote on June 11, 2018 08:53 PM

Razor_imu_9dof node returns no value on rose node

@Doruk_Sonmez wrote:

I’ve followed the steps mentioned at https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/9dof-razor-imu-m0-hookup-guide in Windows using Arduino IDE and i got absolutely no error during uploding the firmware to the device. I can see the whole sensor values in serial port screen of Arduino IDE. However when i plug the device to my robot and run roslaunch razor_imu_9dof razor-pub.launch, it waits too much at the “[INFO] [1528713651.584447]: Flushing first 200 IMU entries…” phase and then when i do rostopic echo /imu, it keeps returning 0 value. Another problem is that it updates every second and it is equal to 1 Hz. I should get much more update. What do you guys think related to problem?

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by @Doruk_Sonmez Doruk Sönmez on June 11, 2018 11:02 AM

Local roscon benefit

@130s wrote:

I found in ROSCon JP 2018 東京 there will be an inaugural localized version of ROSCon this year, co-hosted by Open Robotics. While I’m definitely happy to see such an expansion, I’m curious what’s the expectation out of it from a global community member’s perspective.

Looks like the presentation can be done in the local language for this particular event I referred to, which makes me a bit worried that technical and any information won’t be easily shared in the global community, unlike all previous ROSCons done in English. I believe a part of the reason why ROS has been so successful, same as some other great OSS projects, is because of the global community, the amount of information stacked there and how amazingly well it’s been organized. So I personally think ideally every member should gear even more toward the global community. But I know I’m way too narrow-sighted, thus simply curious.

Thank you in advance.
Isaac

P.S. I found there are some studies (example, but I don’t have an access) about local OSS community role.

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by @130s Isaac I. Y. Saito on June 11, 2018 07:09 AM

June 10, 2018
ROS Programming: Building Powerful robots

@lentinjoseph wrote:

Here comes the Learning Path book for ROS: ROS Programming: Building Powerful robots from Packt

This Learning path is a combination of three published books in ROS to learn the technology from a single source.

This book was released in last month.

Herer are the links to buy it

Packt: https://www.packtpub.com/hardware-and-creative/ros-programming-building-powerful-robots

Amazon.com: http://a.co/iSHsYZQ

Orielly: https://www.safaribooksonline.com/…/ros-prog…/9781788627436/

Number of Pages: 1396

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by @lentinjoseph Lentin Joseph on June 10, 2018 04:10 AM

June 08, 2018
ROSCon18: presentation slot length?

@gavanderhoorn wrote:

This is probably a simple oversight, but the ROSCon18 site seems to be inconsistent regarding the length of the slots for presentations.

In the overview it states:

The bulk of the program will be 30-40 minute presentations (some may be longer or shorter).

Then under the Call for proposals, we have:

Recommended duration: Short (~10 minutes), Medium (~20 minutes) or Long (~30 minutes).

I’m guessing the 40 minute slots are not going to be used this edition of ROSCon?

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by @gavanderhoorn gavanderhoorn on June 08, 2018 07:40 AM

June 07, 2018
Kinetic builds disabled on EOL platform Debian Jessie

@tfoote wrote:

As time passes some of our supported platforms reach their official end of life. Just this week Debian Jessie has reached that point and following our last sync we have disabled the Debian Jessie builds.

Like all of our EOL’d distros we will continue to host the existing ROS packages for the EOL’d distros however we will not be building updated packages for them. You can continue to use the existing packages and of course it will still work from source.

If there are any super critical issues please follow up in this thread for discussing workarounds.

As soon as we’ve verified that turning off the packaging on the buildfarm has successfully settled down we will also disable bloom generation for the EOL distros as well. When we disabled Jessie we also noticed that Fedora 23 and 24 were being generated and will also disable them as they’re past their EOL too.

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by @tfoote Tully Foote on June 07, 2018 08:44 PM

New Packages for Kinetic 2018-06-07

@tfoote wrote:

We’re happy to announce another update for ROS Kinetic. We have 44 new packages as well as 180 updated packages.

There are a couple of removed packages and two known regressions. For more information please see the sync preparation thread: Preparing for Kinetic Sync 2018-06-06

As always thank you to all the maintainers and contributors who help make these updates possible!

Full details are below.

As a side note since Debian Jessie is now officially EOL this is planned to be the last sync with updates to Jessie packages included.

Package Updates for kinetic

Added Packages [44]:

Updated Packages [180]:

Removed Packages [16]:

Thanks to all ROS maintainers who make packages available to the ROS community. The above list of packages was made possible by the work of the following maintainers:

  • Adolfo Rodriguez Tsouroukdissian
  • Alessandro Tondo
  • Andy Zelenak
  • Austin Hendrix
  • B.N.Berrevoets
  • Benjamin Binder
  • Carlos Villar
  • Chittaranjan Srinivas Swaminathan
  • Christian Arndt
  • Christoph Rösmann
  • Dave Coleman
  • Davide Faconti
  • Dirk Thomas
  • Ed Venator
  • Edmond DuPont
  • Elliot Johnson
  • Garren Hendricks
  • George Todoran
  • Ioan Sucan
  • Isaac I. Y. Saito
  • John Keller
  • Jon Binney
  • Kei Okada
  • Kris Kozak
  • Marc Alban
  • Marc Hanheide
  • Mark Moll
  • Markus Bader
  • Martin Günther
  • Mathias Lüdtke
  • Max Schwarz
  • Michael Ferguson
  • Michael Görner
  • Mike Purvis
  • Nick Hawes
  • OSLL
  • Paul Bovbel
  • Pierre-Louis Kabaradjian
  • Pyo
  • ROS Orphaned Package Maintainers
  • Randoms
  • Raphael Hauk
  • Rein Appeldoorn
  • Roberto G. Valenti
  • Rohan Agrawal
  • Ryohei Ueda
  • Sammy Pfeiffer
  • Tony Baltovski
  • Tully Foote
  • Victor Lopez
  • Vladimir Ermakov
  • Wolfgang Merkt
  • Xie fusheng
  • Yusuke Furuta
  • furuta
  • ipa-frn

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by @tfoote Tully Foote on June 07, 2018 06:38 PM

New Packages for Indigo 2018-06-07

@tfoote wrote:

We’re happy to announce another sync with 10 new packages and 77 updated packages for Indigo.

There was one package removed as well.

As always thank you to the dozens of people who have worked to help make these update available to the community! Maintainers, contributors and users have all made a difference.

Full details are below.

Package Updates for indigo

Added Packages [10]:

  • ros-indigo-alfred-bot: 0.1.121-0
  • ros-indigo-ohm-rrl-perception-launch: 0.0.1-1
  • ros-indigo-rosjava-dynamic-reconfigure: 0.2.4-0
  • ros-indigo-smarthome-common-driver: 0.1.61-0
  • ros-indigo-smarthome-media-kodi-driver: 0.1.57-0
  • ros-indigo-smarthome-media-onkyo-driver: 0.1.64-0
  • ros-indigo-smarthome-media-samsungtv-driver: 0.1.58-0
  • ros-indigo-swri-profiler: 0.0.3-0
  • ros-indigo-swri-profiler-msgs: 0.0.3-0
  • ros-indigo-swri-profiler-tools: 0.0.3-0

Updated Packages [77]:

Removed Packages [1]:

Thanks to all ROS maintainers who make packages available to the ROS community. The above list of packages was made possible by the work of the following maintainers:

  • Adolfo Rodriguez Tsouroukdissian
  • Atsushi Watanabe
  • Chen
  • Davide Faconti
  • Dirk Thomas
  • Dorian Scholz
  • Ed Venator
  • Edmond DuPont
  • Elliot Johnson
  • Ioan Sucan
  • John Hsu
  • Jonathan Bohren
  • Justin Huang
  • Kelsey Hawkins
  • Kris Kozak
  • Marc Alban
  • Marc Hanheide
  • Martin Günther
  • Mathias Lüdtke
  • Mickael Gaillard
  • Mickaël Gaillard
  • Nick Hawes
  • Sachin Chitta
  • Tully Foote
  • chris

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by @tfoote Tully Foote on June 07, 2018 06:31 PM


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