May 18, 2018
ICRA 2018, Robotics and Automation landing in Australia!

We are heading off to the southern hemisphere to attend one of the most important conferences in robotics, once again: ICRA 2018 awaits next week in Brisbane, Australia! Robotics and Automation are certainly gaining a lot of importance due to the innovative applications that they can introduce in many diverse sectors. That is why we are so excited that the IEEE Robotics and Automation Society’s main event is here again, the place where all global stakeholders will be joined together to present and share the latest advances in the sector.

Human-Robot Interaction, Artificial Intelligence, Automation, Deep Learning or Humanoids: these are just some of the topics addressed in the packed ICRA conference programme, tackling the issues in all levels and covering the full scope of robotics. In short, the place to be for roboticists! We can’t wait to meet all our friends there and learn about their latest developments with their platforms.

ICRA 2018 Industry Forum

What is the state of the robotics industry? How can a team with ideas succeed and contribute to the progress of robotics, in a field that is constantly evolving? The ICRA 2018 Industry Forum is one of the big highlights of the event and will join together international experts in the sector to answer such questions and take the pulse of the sector.

The euRobotics Board Director and PAL Robotics’ CEO, Francesco Ferro is part of the expert panel of the Industry Forum. He will be participating in the block of robotic clusters, give insights about the knowledge gathered in robotics and the impact of clusters like the euRobotics association, which unites all robotics stakeholders of Europe, both industrial and academic.

Save the date! Thursday, May 22nd – P11 (Plaza Level) from 10:00h to 17:00h. We are looking forward to meeting all of you in Australia!

The post ICRA 2018, Robotics and Automation landing in Australia! appeared first on PAL Robotics Blog.

by Judith Viladomat on May 18, 2018 05:34 PM

May 16, 2018
New Packages for Indigo 2018-05-16

@tfoote wrote:

We’re happy to announce another update for Indigo. With 16 new packages and 105 updated packages.

There was one regression of rtabmap_ros on i386 only that we expect to be resolved in the next sync with this fixed

Thank you to everyone who helped make this sync possible. Full details are below.

Package Updates for indigo

Added Packages [16]:

  • ros-indigo-astuff-sensor-msgs: 2.0.1-0
  • ros-indigo-delphi-esr-msgs: 2.0.1-0
  • ros-indigo-delphi-srr-msgs: 2.0.1-0
  • ros-indigo-ibeo-msgs: 2.0.1-0
  • ros-indigo-jsk-3rdparty: 2.1.10-0
  • ros-indigo-jsk-pr2-desktop: 1.1.0-1
  • ros-indigo-jsk-pr2-startup: 1.1.0-1
  • ros-indigo-jsk-robot: 1.1.0-1
  • ros-indigo-kartech-linear-actuator-msgs: 2.0.1-0
  • ros-indigo-mcl-3dl: 0.1.1-0
  • ros-indigo-mobileye-560-660-msgs: 2.0.1-0
  • ros-indigo-neobotix-usboard-msgs: 2.0.1-0
  • ros-indigo-network-interface: 2.0.0-0
  • ros-indigo-pacmod: 2.0.2-0
  • ros-indigo-pacmod-game-control: 2.0.0-0
  • ros-indigo-pacmod-msgs: 2.0.1-0

Updated Packages [105]:

Removed Packages [0]:

Thanks to all ROS maintainers who make packages available to the ROS community. The above list of packages was made possible by the work of the following maintainers:

  • Andy Zelenak
  • Atsushi Watanabe
  • Austin Hendrix
  • AutonomouStuff Software Development Team
  • AutonomouStuff Software Team
  • Brice Rebsamen
  • D. Hood
  • David Feil-Seifer
  • Davide Faconti
  • Ed Venator
  • Elliot Johnson
  • Guillaume Autran
  • Hitoshi Kamada
  • Kei Okada
  • Kris Kozak
  • Marc Alban
  • Marc Hanheide
  • Mathieu Labbe
  • Michael Lehning
  • Nick Hawes
  • Noda Shintaro
  • ROS Orphaned Package Maintainers
  • Ryohei Ueda
  • Shunichi Nozawa
  • Takuya Nakaoka
  • Vincent Rabaud
  • Yohei Kakiuchi
  • Yuki Furuta
  • Yuto Inagaki
  • furuta
  • k-okada
  • nozawa

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by @tfoote Tully Foote on May 16, 2018 08:56 PM

New Packages for Kinetic 2018-05-16

@tfoote wrote:

We’re happy to announce 26 new packages, 131 updated, and 2 removed packages from Kinetic. There are no known regressions. Thank you to all the maintainers who contributed to this. Full details are below.

Package Updates for kinetic

Added Packages [26]:

Updated Packages [131]:

Removed Packages [2]:

Thanks to all ROS maintainers who make packages available to the ROS community. The above list of packages was made possible by the work of the following maintainers:

  • Adolfo Rodriguez Tsouroukdissian
  • Andy Zelenak
  • Angel Soriano
  • Atsushi Watanabe
  • Austin Hendrix
  • AutonomouStuff Software Development Team
  • AutonomouStuff Software Team
  • Bence Magyar
  • Benjamin Binder
  • Brice Rebsamen
  • Chris Lalancette
  • D. Hood
  • Dave Coleman
  • David Feil-Seifer
  • Davide Faconti
  • Ed Venator
  • Elliot Johnson
  • George Todoran
  • Guillaume Autran
  • Johannes Meyer
  • Konstantin Schauwecker
  • Kris Kozak
  • Marc Alban
  • Marc Hanheide
  • Mark Moll
  • Marko Bjelonic
  • Markus Bader
  • Mathias Lüdtke
  • Mathieu Labbe
  • Max Schwarz
  • Michael Lehning
  • Mike Purvis
  • MoveIt Setup Assistant
  • Nick Hawes
  • Paul Bovbel
  • Raphael Hauk
  • Ryosuke Tajima
  • Sachin Chitta
  • The Cartographer Authors
  • Tokyo Opensource Robotics Kyokai (TORK) Developer Team
  • Victor López
  • Vincent Rabaud
  • Vincent Rousseau
  • Vladimir Ermakov
  • William Woodall

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by @tfoote Tully Foote on May 16, 2018 08:53 PM

May 15, 2018
ROSCon 2017: Autoware: ROS-based OSS for Urban Self-driving Mobility -- Shinpei Kato (The University of Tokyo)

Looking foward to ROSCon 2018 we're highlighting presentations from last year. The ROSCon 2018 registration is currently open. As well as the Call for Proposals.

The first talk at ROSCon 2017 was given by Shinpei Kato about the current state of Autoware a ROS-based open sources software platform for urban self driving mobility.

Video

Abstract

Autoware is open-source software (OSS) for urban self-driving mobility, empowered by ROS. It provides complete modules of perception, decision making, and control, which enables drive-by-wire vehicles to drive autonomously in public road environments. The current maintainer of Autoware is Tier IV, a Japanese academic startup company comprising professors and students. Automotive makers and suppliers now often use Autoware to build their research and development prototypes of self-driving mobility. Autoware has also been partly ported to ROS2. This talk will be of interest to any researchers, developers, and practitioners who are looking for opensource solution of self-driving mobility.

Slides

View the slides here

by Tully Foote on May 15, 2018 07:08 AM

May 14, 2018
New Packages for Lunar 2018-05-14

@marguedas wrote:

We’re happy to announce the availability of 17 new packages and 151 updated packages for ROS Lunar.

As always thank you to all the maintainers who are making these releases as well as all the contributors who have helped contribute to these releases. Full details are below.

Package Updates for lunar

Added Packages [17]:

Updated Packages [151]:

Removed Packages [0]:

Thanks to all ROS maintainers who make packages available to the ROS community. The above list of packages was made possible by the work of the following maintainers:

  • Adolfo Rodriguez Tsouroukdissian
  • Andy Zelenak
  • Atsushi Watanabe
  • Austin Hendrix
  • Bence Magyar
  • Brice Rebsamen
  • Chris Lalancette
  • D. Hood
  • Dave Coleman
  • David V. Lu!!
  • Davide Faconti
  • Ed Venator
  • Elliot Johnson
  • Guillaume Autran
  • Konstantin Schauwecker
  • Kris Kozak
  • Marc Alban
  • Mathias Lüdtke
  • Mathieu Labbe
  • Max Schwarz
  • Michael Lehning
  • Paul Bovbel
  • Robert Haschke
  • Sachin Chitta
  • Vincent Rabaud
  • Vincent Rousseau
  • Vladimir Ermakov
  • William Woodall

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by @marguedas Mikael Arguedas on May 14, 2018 07:22 PM

May 11, 2018
Calling for (robotic) help: Human-robot cooperation to transport goods

Human-Robot collaboration is being pushed ahead by Co4Robots! The EU Project has successfully achieved the first Milestone, which consists of a human and a TIAGo robot working together to move goods from one place to another in cooperation.

Remember that Co4Robots’ purpose is to create a multi-robot system that is able to interconnect and control diverse robots in an environment that is constantly changing. So, for example, if a robot happens to fail from doing a task, another one can notice it and go to the rescue.

Understanding that a person asks for help

Co4Robots-research-TIAGo-human-robot-collaboration-pal-roboticsIn this first milestone, TIAGo is put into a dynamic environment in which a person asks for help to move an object. TIAGo has to understand that the person is making a sign to him, stop whatever it is doing and be flexible enough to change plans.

Then, the robot and the person grab the object and transport it all together. How? Using force feedback: TIAGo follows the direction that the human transmits through the force he applies to the object. Finally, the person indicates TIAGo to stop helping through another gesture.

What does it take for a robot to have an autonomous behavior in such situation? To begin with: autonomous mobility, obstacle avoidance and self-localization in space, plus manipulation abilities that take into account the force feedback of the person. Also, TIAGo had to successfully recognize and track objects, people and identify gestures.

Human-Robot alliance goes beyond research

Imagine people with mobility issues that can count on the support of a TIAGo at home or at the hospital facilities. Think about supply chains where robots can lend a helping hand to safely transport goods around. Or assist in loading and unloading medium weight boxes and guarantee that the worker doesn’t suffer any injury.

This Co4Robots application is certainly opening a world of possibilities in enabling collaborative robots to effectively cooperate with us. Co4Robots developments are valuable for both industrial and domestic environments and are actually applicable to many more contexts. That’s how we advance towards a better quality of life by using robots!

The Co4Robots consortium is formed by KTH (Sweden), BOSCH (Germany), FORTH (Greece), UGOT (Sweden), NTUA (Greece) and PAL Robotics (Spain).

The post Calling for (robotic) help: Human-robot cooperation to transport goods appeared first on PAL Robotics Blog.

by Judith Viladomat on May 11, 2018 08:22 AM

May 10, 2018
ROS Melodic Morenia Beta has begun

@clalancette wrote:

Dear ROS users,

The beta for Melodic has begun!

Thanks to all of our contributors and maintainers who made this possible.

ros-melodic-desktop-full is available on Ubuntu Bionic (18.04), Ubuntu Artful (17.10), and Debian Stretch. So take a moment to be an upstanding member of the ROS community
and:

  • sudo apt-get install ros-melodic-desktop-full
  • Try testing out packages you regularly use that are available in the beta.
  • Report any bugs you find on the issue tracker for the package (usually available on the packge for a package on wiki.ros.org).
  • Try out documentation, tutorials, and generated documentation and fix issues on the Wiki.
  • If you are a package maintainer, continue releasing packages, fixing issues wherever possible, and checking your package documentation. The Melodic beta is the best time to change API or change the behavior of your code, but don’t forget to update the Migration page if you do:
    http://wiki.ros.org/melodic/Migration
    To know if your package can be released see the blocked_releases status page.

May 23rd, World Turtle Day, is still our official release date for ROS Melodic and we are on track to meet it! So mark it down into your calendar, and if you’re a maintainer, plan to finish your releases before then to leave some breathing room.

Known discrepancy amongst platforms:

  • octovis is not available on armhf as in previous ROS Distributions
    Every other package is available on all architectures/platforms targeted by REP3!

For a more comprehensive view of the current status of Melodic, including packages outside of desktop-full that are available in the beta, see the status pages on repositories.ros.org:

http://repositories.ros.org/status_page/ros_melodic_default.html
http://repositories.ros.org/status_page/ros_melodic_ds.html
http://repositories.ros.org/status_page/ros_melodic_dsv8.html
http://repositories.ros.org/status_page/ros_melodic_ubhf.html
http://repositories.ros.org/status_page/ros_melodic_ubv8.html
http://repositories.ros.org/status_page/compare_lunar_melodic.html

Cheers!

Chris Lalancette
Melodic ROS Boss

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by @clalancette Chris on May 10, 2018 07:50 PM

May 09, 2018
ROS_DEBUG of ROS1 is equivalent to What of ROS2?

@Heiko wrote:

ROS_DEBUG of ROS1 is equivalent to “What” of ROS2?

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by @Heiko Changsong Yu on May 09, 2018 10:04 PM

ROSCon 2017: Open Remarks

Looking foward to ROSCon 2018 we're highlighting presentations from last year. The ROSCon 2018 registration is currently open. As well as the Call for Proposals.

To kick off this series we'll start with the ROSCon Opening Remarks. Brian Gerkey welcomes everyone and Tully Foote provides some perspective on the 10 years of ROS as we approached ROS's 10th anniversary.

Video

Slides

View the slides here

by Tully Foote on May 09, 2018 09:43 PM

Proposed changes to the ROS releases

@clalancette wrote:

Based on the results of our recent survey (ROS1 2018 Version Survey: The results are in), as well as the download statistics that were posted last year (http://download.ros.org/downloads/metrics/metrics-report-2017-07.pdf), Open Robotics is proposing some changes to the ROS release schedule that should reduce the support burden on maintainers and on Open Robotics itself. The proposals below are roughly ordered from having the least impact to the most impact:

Continue releasing a ROS LTS every 2 years

  • Conclusion: There is high use and demand for the ROS LTS releases.
  • Proposal: Keep releasing the ROS LTS on a 2 year schedule, as is currently done.

Stop targeting non-LTS Ubuntu distributions with ROS LTS

  • Conclusion: There is very low adoption of the non-LTS Ubuntu distributions by users. The non-LTS Ubuntu versions are only supported for a short time after the ROS LTS release.
  • Proposal: Stop targeting non-LTS Ubuntu distributions with ROS LTS releases.
  • Consequences:
    • No ROS LTS binaries for non-LTS Ubuntu releases.
    • No need to support non-LTS Ubuntu releases for packages in ROS LTS.
    • Instead of using non-LTS Ubuntu releases users can use the Ubuntu enablement stacks (HWE), e.g. 16.04.4.
    • May be more difficult for users to build from source on non-LTS Ubuntu distributions since it is not tested in any automated way.

Only support one version of Debian with one ROS LTS

  • Conclusion: Having a Debian release span two ROS LTS releases prevents us from using newer system dependencies.
  • Proposal: Only support one version of Debian with one ROS LTS.
  • Consequences:
    • A Debian release would only be associated with the first ROS LTS released while the Debian release is also available.
    • Some ROS LTS’s may have no Debian version associated with it.

Replace the non-LTS ROS release with a rolling ROS distro

  • Conclusion: There is very light usage of the ROS non-LTS releases.
  • Proposal: Only release ROS LTS’s, and create a rolling ROS distro based on the last ROS LTS to exist between ROS LTS’s. The goal is to reduce the workload on both maintainers and Open Robotics by removing a distribution which has only a few users. To compensate for the large gap between releases, the rolling ROS distro will allow maintainers to depend on newer system dependencies and get advanced notice if the next Ubuntu release will have API breaking changes that packages need to deal with.
    • As a starting point the rolling ROS distro would take package releases from the latest ROS LTS.
    • Maintainers could optionally opt-in to specifying newer versions of their packages (newer than the version in the LTS) for the rolling ROS distro by providing additional information.
    • The buildfarm (http://build.ros.org) will periodically attempt to build packages in the rolling ROS distro only on the latest released version of Ubuntu (in the first 6 month the Ubuntu LTS, later only the latest non-LTS Ubuntu), notifying maintainers on failure.
    • (optional) The result of these periodic jobs could be made available as a monolithic archives, e.g. a .zip or .tar.gz file, which would contain all the packages which built successfully. This avoids making users build all packages from source.
  • Consequences:
    • No future ROS non-LTS releases will be created.
    • Users that want to use the latest code must build from source to do so, unless we elect to make “fat archives” of the periodic builds available.
    • The buildfarm would not produce any Debian packages for the rolling ROS distro (in order to not require running bloom for future Ubuntu distros).

Please let us know what you think about each of these proposals.

Your Friendly ROS team


Options discussed for non-LTS ROS releases

While discussing the option of dropping the non-LTS ROS releases, we came up with a number of different things we could do. The following is a complete list of the options we discussed, with some details of the pros and cons we see on each approach.

  • Have a rolling ROS distro targeting the latest Ubuntu release (this is the option we recommend).

    • Pros
      • Ability to automatically detect changes in Ubuntu dependencies that may break ROS packages when updating to a newer Ubuntu release.
      • (optional) Zip archive allows people to use binaries.
      • Packages can use the new functionality from Ubuntu dependencies.
    • Cons
      • Could make ROS LTS less stable - maintainers may push more stuff into ROS LTS to get binary packages.
      • Few users want to use non-LTS Ubuntu releases.
  • Have a rolling ROS distro, targeting the latest Ubuntu LTS only.

    • Pros
      • The base Ubuntu platform is used by many users.
      • Ability to automatically detect changes in ROS dependencies that may break ROS packages.
      • Maintainers can release an unstable version of their packages on a base Ubuntu platform used by many users.
      • Easier for users to test the rolling ROS distro since it is the latest Ubuntu LTS.
    • Cons
      • No ability to automatically detect changes in Ubuntu dependencies that may break ROS packages when updating to a newer Ubuntu release.
      • Users or packages can’t easily use new functionality from new Ubuntu releases.
  • Have a rolling ROS distro, targeting both the latest Ubuntu non-LTS and the latest Ubuntu LTS.

    • Pros
      • Packages tested against stable Ubuntu dependencies and against newest Ubuntu dependencies.
    • Cons
      • If users want to use newer versions of dependencies, their code needs to build for both the current Ubuntu LTS and the latest Ubuntu.
      • Might be painful for maintainers to maintain code handling all Ubuntu versions as specified above.
  • Do nothing, keep the ROS non-LTS releases as is currently being done.

    • Pros
      • Keeps the status quo.
    • Cons
      • Maintainers have to release/re-bloom their packages every year for a small userbase.
      • Some maintainers do not release into the ROS non-LTS releases, so those releases are always less complete.
      • Open Robotics needs to do work every year for very small userbase.
  • Just do a ROS LTS release every two years, with no additional infrastructure provided in-between.

    • Pros
      • Package maintainers and Open Robotics only have to do work every 2 years.
    • Cons
      • Large Ubuntu platform delta between ROS releases, possibly leading to lots of API breaks due to Ubuntu platform dependencies changing.
      • A full tick-tock cycle of API deprecation/removal would take 4 years (2 full ROS releases).

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by @clalancette Chris on May 09, 2018 12:38 PM

May 04, 2018
PAL Robotics upgrades to ROS Kinetic!

All of our robots at PAL Robotics have been upgraded to ROS Kinetic Kame, the latest LTS Release from OSRF! This means we have also switched them to the Ubuntu 16.04 version. ROS Kinetic Kame is used by over 85% of the latest ROS1 Survey respondents – a survey with very interesting results, by the way.

Do you have one of our robots? Contact us in order to know how to upgrade it to ROS Kinetic! Enjoy the latest stable version of ROS and Ubuntu, the newest features they come along with, and all the improvements made for our robots. Make sure your robots are synchronized with the developments released by PAL Robotics team!

Don’t have one of our robots yet? It’s also OK, this is why the open-source simulation models of our robots – also updated- are made available at ROS Wiki. Remember that we have public repositories so that anyone can test our robots in the simulation. With TIAGo you also have available some ROS Tutorials to enrich your programming skills and develop all kinds of applications in Gazebo. Get started here!

Why stepping into ROS Kinetic?

Kinetic Kame is the latest ROS Long Term Support (LTS) distribution version available after Indigo and will be supported by OSRF until April 2021. ROS Kinetic is sustained by Ubuntu 16.04, which makes it compatible with the brand-new powerful laptops and pcs available. The newest ROS distribution’s features and most recent libraries published show significant advantages with Kinetic. With the major bug fixing that has taken place, you will enjoy having even better and more robust applications, such as navigation and control which have been improved.

What’s new in ROS Kinetic with our robots?

reem-c-pal-robotics-whole-body-control-ros-kinetic

New benefits come from migrating our robots to ROS Kinetic and Ubuntu 16.04, besides the ones coming from the upgrade itself. From now on, PAL Robotics team will provide continuous upgrades from Ubuntu and ROS in a more agile way, with the robots’ software periodically revised.

During the upgrade, we developed a better user experience to run the demos available for our robots. The Whole-Body Control application has been enhanced and now its API provides much more expressiveness for the robots.

In addition to the development ISO we have always provided with our robots, we will now provide our customers with a Docker image for development. This should enable development of our robots without the need to have a dedicated partition for the purpose.

Why ROS-based robots?

Instead of creating our own code and libraries for the robots we develop – which could make our work easier at some point – we prefer to take ROS as the standard software platform for PAL Robotics’ robots. It has been so since 2010 (8 years already!) when we started implementing ROS on the REEM robot, and time proved us right.

ros-kinetic-pal-robotics

The Robot Operating System (ROS) has exponentially grown in terms of users, tools, and relevance over the last years. RVIZ, Gazebo, ROS Control or MoveIt! are just some of the powerful tools that ROS provides to make our life easier when building complex robotics applications.

It’s all about sharing: robotics is a complex and broad field that can only advance with joint efforts. ROS, its inter-platform operability, and its modularity enable to share the know-how between the developers by having a common framework. That way we can avoid reinventing the wheel and focus ourselves on much bigger challenges.

Are you using Kinetic yet?

The post PAL Robotics upgrades to ROS Kinetic! appeared first on PAL Robotics Blog.

by Judith Viladomat on May 04, 2018 03:01 PM

ROSCon 2018: Registration Open

@tfoote wrote:

We’re excited to announce that registration for ROSCon 2018 is now open.

Register now!

Note that the early registration deadline is August 11th, 2018.

The call for proposals is also open until July 2nd. What do you want to share with the community?

And there’s 3 days left for the Diversity Scholarship Applications to be submitted!

Thank you again to our Platinum Sponsor, Erle, and to all of our Gold Sponsors: Amazon, Clearpath, Fetch Robotics, Google, Locus, ROBOTIS, SICK, Tier IV, Toyota Research Institute, Universal Robots.

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by @tfoote Tully Foote on May 04, 2018 12:17 AM

May 03, 2018
First ROS-Industrial Consortium Americas Training for 2018

The ROS-Industrial Consortium Americas recently completed another successful ROS-I training event April 10-12 at Southwest Research Institute. We had 11 people from a variety of industries complete the Basic and Advanced training material, which covers a variety of topics from creating a ROS node, publishers, subscribers, and using the ROS parameter server. The Advanced training material covered motion planning using Stomp and Descartes, as well as creating a computer vision application using the Point Cloud Library (PCL).

On Day 1, the Basic and Advance track groups met separately, but were merged together the remaining days. The training material was cumulative so that by the end of Day 2, participants had a working ROS project that could move a robot to a simulated box location. On Day 3, everyone got to try their hand at a more challenging vision or path planning project. Many were able to complete the challenge and execute it on one of the available robots.

20180412_085406.jpg

Attendees also got a short tour of SwRI's lab space that included hardware for application testing and development. By request, a subset of attendees requested a breakout session where they were able to see a side-by-side comparison of some of the 3D depth sensors available, as well as a new surface reconstruction technique, taking advantage of the proximity of the lab space and the development hardware available.

20180412_084254.jpg 20180412_084818.jpg

Thanks to everyone who came and helped make this event great! If you have questions about ROS-Industrial training, please feel free to contact us. Keep an eye out for the next ROS-Industrial Consortium Americas event at the Events page!

by Alex Goins on May 03, 2018 04:21 PM

April 30, 2018
ROS (cpp) on dockers

@Gil_C wrote:

Hi Guys,

would be happy to get your take on this matter.

I have a robot project built out of around 20 nodes and nodelets.
In this project I have 2 machines - one on the robot itself (Rpi3) and one as a base station (a strong PC) - all connected to the same ROS master.

Now I would like to be able to do kind of a load balance so if I see that the CPU / mem on the robot is low, I would be able to kill the nodelet on the robot and run restart it on the base station.
I thought of using Docker (specifically ResinIO) for this, but not sure this is the right way to go with it…
Any suggestions on this? What are the pros and cons of running ROS on Docker?

Thank you very much!
Gil

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by @Gil_C Gil C on April 30, 2018 03:36 PM

Announcing rosmon - interactive ROS process monitor

@xqms wrote:

Hi everyone,

I want to draw your attention to a nice tool that we developed and are using in all our ROS activities. rosmon is a roslaunch-compliant launch tool for ROS, especially designed for developer friendliness and interactive monitoring of long-running ROS processes, e.g. for competitions or demonstrations.

Just a short teaser:

  • Start/stop/restart single nodes using a modern console UI, ROS service calls, or an rqt plugin.
  • Attach to a running node process with gdb with two keystrokes. In case your node dies without gdb attached, rosmon automatically collects a core dump and launches gdb against the core dump on request.
  • stdout/stderr are separately captured per process and annotated, ensuring overview (no more ‘who is printing this message?’).

For details please check out the ROS wiki page - there are many small details which make the life of a ROS developer a little bit easier.

rosmon has been open-source for quite some time (developed for the DARPA Robotics Challenge 2015), but we now provide binary packages through the ROS build farm for ROS Lunar, Kinetic, and Melodic - which is a nice time for an official announcement :slight_smile:

We are looking forward to thoughts, feedback, bug reports, or pull requests!

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by @xqms Max Schwarz on April 30, 2018 01:31 PM

April 26, 2018
OpenCV 3.2 in Debian Stretch

@clalancette wrote:

Hello all,
In preparation for the upcoming Melodic release, early next week we are planning on uploading OpenCV 3.2 packages for Debian Stretch amd64/arm64 to http://packages.ros.org. This means that any Debian Stretch machines that have packages.ros.org in their /etc/apt/sources.list.d will get libopencv-* upgraded to 3.2 the next time they run sudo apt-get upgrade. This will allow maintainers to release a single version of their package that runs across all of the Melodic supported platforms.

Please let us know if you have comments or questions about this change.

Thanks,
Your friendly Melodic maintainers

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by @clalancette Chris on April 26, 2018 09:36 PM

ROSCon 2018 Call for Proposals

We're excited to announce that we are now accepting presentation proposals for ROSCon 2018!

ROSConMadrid.png

Presentations on all topics related to ROS are invited. Examples include: introducing attendees to a ROS package or library, exploring how to use tools, manipulating sensor data, and applications for robots.

Women, members of minority groups, and members of other under-represented groups are encouraged to submit presentation proposals to ROSCon.

Proposals will be reviewed by a program committee that will evaluate fit, impact, and balance.

We cannot offer presentations that are not proposed! If there is a topic on which you would like to present, please propose it. If you have an idea for an important topic that you do not want to present yourself, please post it for discussion at ROS Discourse.

Topic areas

All ROS-related work is invited. Topics of interest include:

  • Best practices
  • New packages
  • Robot-specific development
  • Robot simulation
  • Safety and security
  • Embedded systems
  • Product development & commercialization
  • Research and education
  • Enterprise deployment
  • Community organization and direction
  • Testing, quality, and documentation
  • Robotics competitions and collaborations
  • Related open source projects

To get an idea of the content and tone of ROSCon, check out the slides and videos from previous years.

Proposal format

A session proposal must include:

  • Title
  • Presenter (name and affiliation)
  • Recommended duration: Short (~10 minutes), Medium (~20 minutes) or Long (~30 minutes)
  • Summary [maximum 100 words]: to be used in advertising the presentation
  • Description [maximum 1000 words]: outline, goals (what will the audience learn?), pointers to packages to be discussed

Please be sure to include in your proposal enough information for the program committee to evaluate the importance and impact of your presentation. We strongly encourage you to provide links to publicly available resources, including code repositories and demonstration videos. Demonstrated community interest is helpful in evaluating proposals. A proposal that promises to make an open source release in the future is difficult for the program committee to evaluate and less likely to be accepted.

Submit your proposal at the submissions site by July 2nd, 2018.

by Tully Foote on April 26, 2018 12:24 AM

ROSCon 2018: Call for Proposals

@tfoote wrote:

We’re excited to announce that we are now accepting presentation proposals for ROSCon 2018!

Presentations on all topics related to ROS are invited. Examples include: introducing attendees to a ROS package or library, exploring how to use tools, manipulating sensor data, and applications for robots.

Women, members of minority groups, and members of other under-represented groups are encouraged to submit presentation proposals to ROSCon.

Proposals will be reviewed by a program committee that will evaluate fit, impact, and balance.

We cannot offer presentations that are not proposed! If there is a topic on which you would like to present, please propose it. If you have an idea for an important topic that you do not want to present yourself, please post it for discussion at ROS Discourse.

Topic areas

All ROS-related work is invited. Topics of interest include:

  • Best practices
  • New packages
  • Robot-specific development
  • Robot simulation
  • Safety and security
  • Embedded systems
  • Product development & commercialization
  • Research and education
  • Enterprise deployment
  • Community organization and direction
  • Testing, quality, and documentation
  • Robotics competitions and collaborations
  • Related open source projects

To get an idea of the content and tone of ROSCon, check out the slides and videos from previous years.

Proposal format

A session proposal must include:

  • Title
  • Presenter (name and affiliation)
  • Recommended duration: Short (~10 minutes), Medium (~20 minutes) or Long (~30 minutes)
  • Summary [maximum 100 words]: to be used in advertising the presentation
  • Description [maximum 1000 words]: outline, goals (what will the audience learn?), pointers to packages to be discussed

Please be sure to include in your proposal enough information for the program committee to evaluate the importance and impact of your presentation. We strongly encourage you to provide links to publicly available resources, including code repositories and demonstration videos. Demonstrated community interest is helpful in evaluating proposals. A proposal that promises to make an open source release in the future is difficult for the program committee to evaluate and less likely to be accepted.

Submit your proposal at the submissions site by July 2nd, 2018.

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by @tfoote Tully Foote on April 26, 2018 12:08 AM

New Package for Kinetic 2018-04-25

@tfoote wrote:

We’re happy to announce 141 new packages and 133 updated packages for Kinetic.

This is a larger sync than usual. Thank you to everyone who contributed both maintainers and contributors!

A full listing is below.

Package Updates for kinetic

Added Packages [141]:

Updated Packages [133]:

Removed Packages [0]:

Thanks to all ROS maintainers who make packages available to the ROS community. The above list of packages was made possible by the work of the following maintainers:

  • Adolfo Rodriguez Tsouroukdissian
  • AlexV
  • Alexander W. Winkler
  • Atsushi Watanabe
  • Austin Hendrix
  • Bence Magyar
  • Carl
  • Chad Rockey
  • Chris Lalancette
  • Dave Feil-Seifer
  • David Feil-Seifer
  • Davide Faconti
  • Devon Ash
  • Edmond DuPont
  • Elliot Johnson
  • Enrique Fernandez
  • Felix Ruess
  • Hitoshi Kamada
  • Jacob Perron
  • Kei Okada
  • Kelsey Hawkins
  • Ken Tossell
  • Maciej ZURAD
  • Mahsa Parsapour
  • Marc Alban
  • Mateusz Sadowski
  • Max Schwarz
  • Michael Ferguson
  • Mikael Arguedas
  • Mike Purvis
  • Monika Florek-Jasinska
  • Noda Shintaro
  • Paul Bovbel
  • Pierre-Louis Kabaradjian
  • Pramuditha Aravinda
  • Prasenjit Mukherjee
  • Pyo
  • ROS Orphaned Package Maintainers
  • Rohan Agrawal
  • Russell Toris
  • Ryohei Ueda
  • Sammy Pfeiffer
  • Scott K Logan
  • Shengye Wang
  • Shohei Fujii
  • Takuya Nakaoka
  • The Cartographer Owners
  • Tom Moore
  • Toni Oliver
  • Tony Baltovski
  • Vincent Rabaud
  • Vladimir Ermakov
  • Yohei Kakiuchi
  • Youhei Kakiuchi
  • Yuki Furuta
  • Yuto Inagaki
  • Zahi Kakish
  • zmk5

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by @tfoote Tully Foote on April 26, 2018 12:02 AM

April 25, 2018
RFC: Proposal to reconcile ROS 1 and ROS 2 C++ style guides

@marguedas wrote:

Hello ROS users!

We’ve been starting to migrate some core packages to ROS 2 and in the process found a few conflicts between the ROS 1 and ROS 2 C++ style guides.
These differences cause some friction when either trying to have a single branch be both ROS 1 and ROS 2 or when just maintaining patches between the ROS 1 and ROS 2 versions.
So, in order to minimize this friction, we’d like to eliminate any conflicts that we can.
After looking at the conflicts, it seems that relaxing the ROS 1 style’s in a few places is the best solution, but we would like some feedback on the proposed changes.
All of the changes would not require any changes in existing ROS 1 packages, but would allow ROS 1 packages to make changes to their style to comply with both the ROS 2 style and the newly-relaxed ROS 1 style.

These are the changes we’re proposing to the ROS 1 C++ style guide:

  • Header file names:
    • Existing ROS 1 style: header files should always use the .h extension
    • Proposed ROS 1 style: header files should use either .h or .hpp, if you are planning on supporting both ROS 1 and ROS 2, the .hpp extension is recommended.
      • Rationale: differentiating between C and C++ header files provides a way to have both a C and a C++ interface to a library without having to modify the filenames arbitrarily
      • Additional benefit: it gives humans and tools a hint about which language is used in the given header file
  • Header define guards:
    • Existing ROS 1 style: <PACKAGE>_<PATH>_<FILE>_H
    • Proposed ROS 1 style: <PACKAGE>[_]_<PATH>[_]_<FILE>_{H,<EXT>}[_] and optionally leave <PACKAGE> off when <PATH> is the same
      • Allow an optional trailing underscore
      • Allow for double underscore as separator between PATH tokens, the PROJECT token, and the FILE token of the guard name
      • Optionally use actual file extension, e.g. if the header is pluginlib/pluginlib.hpp then use PLUGINLIB__PLUGINLIB_HPP_ rather than PLUGINLIB__PLUGINLIB_H_
        • Rationale: allows for coexisting C and C++ headers to have different guard names
  • Braces:
    • Existing ROS 1 style: open braces (i.e curly braces should always be on their own line)
    • Proposed ROS 1 style: allow any consistent braces style, but continue to recommend open braces for ROS 1 only code (i.e. don’t change unless trying to coexist with other style guides)
      • Rationale: This is the most subjective change, but by relaxing the requirement in the ROS 1 guide it allows us to have the ROS 1 style coexist with the ROS 2 style and others more easily.
        • Closer to Google C++ Style Guide recommendation: e.g. “The open curly brace is always on the end of the last line of the function declaration, not the start of the next line.”, but it defines brace style for each case separately.
        • Minimizes vertical whitespace use: The more code that fits on one screen, the easier it is to follow and understand the control flow of the program.
        • A preference was given to use the newer ROS 2 style in “dual-homed” packages and add an option to the ROS 1 style checkers to ignore the brace style violations, though the inverse is also possible.

These are our preferred changes, but we’re interested in the feedback from everyone.

Once we reach some consensus we’ll help update any ROS 1 linters with changes and/or options.

Your friendly ROS team

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by @marguedas Mikael Arguedas on April 25, 2018 03:23 PM

New Package for Indigo 2018-04-24

@tfoote wrote:

We’re happy to announce the availability of 25 noew packages for Indigo as well as 101 updated packages.

There are 11 packages removed in this sync one of which is a regression. And there were also a few more regressions specifically on Trusty i386 For more information about that please see Preparing for Indigo Sync 2018-04-23

Thanks to all the maintainers and contributors who help make this all happen each an every sync.

Full details are below.

Package Updates for indigo

Added Packages [25]:

Updated Packages [101]:

Removed Packages [11]:

Thanks to all ROS maintainers who make packages available to the ROS community. The above list of packages was made possible by the work of the following maintainers:

  • Adolfo Rodriguez Tsouroukdissian
  • AlexV
  • Alexander W. Winkler
  • Atsushi Watanabe
  • Bence Magyar
  • Dave Feil-Seifer
  • David Feil-Seifer
  • Devon Ash
  • Edmond DuPont
  • Elliot Johnson
  • Enrique Fernandez
  • Felix Ruess
  • Hitoshi Kamada
  • Jacob Perron
  • Justin Huang
  • Kei Okada
  • Kelsey Hawkins
  • Maciej ZURAD
  • Marc Alban
  • Mikael Arguedas
  • Mike Purvis
  • Monika Florek-Jasinska
  • Noda Shintaro
  • Paul Bovbel
  • Pyo
  • Ryohei Ueda
  • Sammy Pfeiffer
  • Scott K Logan
  • Shengye Wang
  • Takuya Nakaoka
  • Tom Moore
  • Tony Baltovski
  • Yohei Kakiuchi
  • Yuki Furuta
  • Yuto Inagaki
  • k-okada

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by @tfoote Tully Foote on April 25, 2018 06:13 AM

April 24, 2018
New Packages for Lunar 2018-04-24

@marguedas wrote:

We’re happy to announce the availability of 19 new packages and 66 updated packages for ROS Lunar.

As always thank you to all the maintainers who are making these releases as well as all the contributors who have helped contribute to these releases. Full details are below.

Package Updates for lunar

Added Packages [19]:

Updated Packages [66]:

Removed Packages [0]:

Thanks to all ROS maintainers who make packages available to the ROS community. The above list of packages was made possible by the work of the following maintainers:

  • Adolfo Rodriguez Tsouroukdissian
  • Alexander W. Winkler
  • Atsushi Watanabe
  • Bence Magyar
  • Chad Rockey
  • Chris Lalancette
  • Dave Coleman
  • Edmond DuPont
  • Elliot Johnson
  • Enrique Fernandez
  • Felix Ruess
  • Jacob Perron
  • Kelsey Hawkins
  • Ken Tossell
  • Maciej ZURAD
  • Marc Alban
  • Max Schwarz
  • Mikael Arguedas
  • Monika Florek-Jasinska
  • Paul Bovbel
  • ROS Orphaned Package Maintainers
  • Sammy Pfeiffer
  • Scott K Logan
  • Shengye Wang
  • The Cartographer Owners
  • Tom Moore
  • Toni Oliver
  • Vincent Rabaud
  • Vladimir Ermakov

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by @marguedas Mikael Arguedas on April 24, 2018 02:50 PM

Competing at ERL: an interview with HOMER Team

Making robots help at home. This is the “magic” that teams competing in the Service Robots category of the European Robotics League (ERL) turn into reality in each tournament. Robotics competitions like ERL or RoboCup@Home are one of the ways in which researchers are driven to develop applications that transform how people live at home. It is a revolution that sooner rather than later will significantly benefit society, especially old and disabled people.

Great skills, capable platforms and a good dose of motivation are attributes that all teams share. One example of it is Team HOMER, from the University of Koblenz-Landau. The German team’s hard work with Lisa and TIAGo robots has paid off with major successes: winners of RoboCup 2017 World Championship (Nagoya, Japan) Open Platform League, first position in four TBMs of the ERL Service Robotics Season 2017-2018 (all over Europe), and second position at the RoboMasters Competition (Shenzhen, China), amongst others.

We had the opportunity to speak with HOMER Team Leader, Raphael Memmesheimer, during the ERL SR Barcelona Local tournament held at PAL Robotics’ offices. Here’s a summary of the nice conversation we had:

 

When fun drives innovation

The excitement and pressure of a competition can turn developing and programming into a challenging game. “First of all it’s fun, I like to be at competitions like this, you always learn a lot”, stated Memmesheimer. “It’s a benchmarking, so sometimes you may be driven to your limits!”

When asked about the relevance of robotic competitions like ERL, he also highlighted the knowledge that they get from putting the robot into a new environment, besides the networking and cooperation with other teams.

TIAGo on board

HOMER Team was happy to discover where TIAGo is built and could meet the developers behind it at PAL Robotics, during ERL Barcelona Tournament. They also shared with us some great impressions on the robot, after working with it during the tournament preparation and competition.

Memmesheimer considers that one strength of HOMER Team is their software, which makes it easier to teach students fast and get started with the robot. “We have the same software than in our robots home, like we have now on TIAGo, with minor changes. [With it] we can show navigation, manipulation, voice recognition, object recognition.” They are confident there’s still room to improve its features even more.

It’s been great to speak with HOMER Team Leader, we wish them best of luck at the next tournaments! We will stay tuned to their blog for sure during the upcoming RoboCup German Open.

Credits-Visual-Outcasts-euRobotics-Memmesheimer-HOMER-Team-ERL-Winner HOMER-Team-PAL-Robotics-ERL-Barcelona-Tournament-Service-Robotics

The post Competing at ERL: an interview with HOMER Team appeared first on PAL Robotics Blog.

by Judith Viladomat on April 24, 2018 02:06 PM

April 20, 2018
ROSCon 2018 Diversity Scholarships

The ROSCon 2018 organizing committee aims for ROSCon to represent the entire ROS community, which is diverse and global. In addition to promoting technology that is open source, we also strive to ensure that our communities themselves are as open and accessible as possible, since we recognize that diversity benefits the ROS ecosystem as a whole.

Whoever you are, whatever you do, and wherever you do it, if you're interested in ROS, then we want you to join us at ROSCon. To help reduce the financial barriers to conference attendance, the ROSCon organizing committee is offering a number of scholarships to members of traditionally underrepresented groups in the tech community. Thanks to the support of the program's sponsors, these scholarships each include a complimentary conference registration pass and three nights' accommodation shared with another recipient[1]. Limited travel support is available for participants whose travel to the conference would otherwise be infeasible[2]. Please note that all other expenses (including any visa requirements) will be the responsibility of the participant.

  • [1] To maximize the impact of the scholarship funds, scholarship recipients will be asked to share a room with another recipient. Under special circumstances alternative arrangements can be accommodated.
  • [2] Participants will be responsible for covering their travel expenses up-front, as the travel support will be provided at the conference.

Eligibility

We invite applications from members of groups that have been traditionally underrepresented in the robotics community (including but not limited to: women, LGBTQ+, people of color, people with disabilities, people from racial and/or ethnic minorities in the robotics community, and people from developing nations), who may not otherwise be able to attend ROSCon.

Previous ROSCon Diversity Scholarship recipients are not eligible to re-apply, but we are proud to share this feedback from a participant of the 2017 Diversity Program:

The ROSCon Diversity Scholarship Program provided me with an opportunity that would have been completely impossible without it. I was able to attend my first robotics conference and feel empowered to keep working to try and make a positive impact on this community. Also, it was very encouraging to see so many companies stepping up to promote and enable diversity within their companies and the robotics community. Thank you!

Sponsors

The ROSCon 2018 Diversity Program is made possible with support from the following sponsors:

amazon_logo

erle_logo

fetch_logo

google_logo

locus_logo

open_robotics_logo

If your organization is interested in getting involved in the Diversity Program, please get in contact.

How to Apply

To apply, fill out this form by May 6 2018, describing how you are involved with ROS and the robotics community and what you hope to get out of attending ROSCon. Scholarships will be awarded based on a combination of need and impact. Every applicant will be notified of the outcome of their application.

For more information about ROSCon 2018, including the program, code of conduct, and childcare options, please see http://roscon.ros.org/2018

Thank you to the conference Platinum Sponsor, Erle, and to our Gold Sponsors: Amazon, Clearpath, Fetch Robotics, Google, Locus, ROBOTIS, Tier IV, Universal Robots.

by Tully Foote on April 20, 2018 11:34 PM

ROSCon 2018 Diversity Scholarships: Applications Open

@dhood wrote:

ROSCon 2018 Diversity Scholarships: Applications Open

The ROSCon 2018 organizing committee aims for ROSCon to represent the entire ROS community, which is diverse and global. In addition to promoting technology that is open source, we also strive to ensure that our communities themselves are as open and accessible as possible, since we recognize that diversity benefits the ROS ecosystem as a whole.

Whoever you are, whatever you do, and wherever you do it, if you’re interested in ROS, then we want you to join us at ROSCon. To help reduce the financial barriers to conference attendance, the ROSCon organizing committee is offering a number of scholarships to members of traditionally underrepresented groups in the tech community. Thanks to the support of the program’s sponsors, these scholarships each include a complimentary conference registration pass and three nights’ accommodation shared with another recipient*. Limited travel support is available for participants whose travel to the conference would otherwise be infeasible**. Please note that all other expenses (including any visa requirements) will be the responsibility of the participant.

*To maximize the impact of the scholarship funds, scholarship recipients will be asked to share a room with another recipient. Under special circumstances alternative arrangements can be accommodated.
**Participants will be responsible for covering their travel expenses up-front, as the travel support will be provided once at the conference.

Eligibility

We invite applications from members of groups that have been traditionally underrepresented in the robotics community (including but not limited to: women, LGBTQ+, people with disabilities, people from racial and/or ethnic minorities in the robotics community, and people from developing nations), who may not otherwise be able to attend ROSCon.

Previous ROSCon Diversity Scholarship recipients are not eligible to re-apply, but we are proud to share this feedback from a participant of the 2017 Diversity Program:

The ROSCon Diversity Scholarship Program provided me with an opportunity that would have been completely impossible without it. I was able to attend my first robotics conference and feel empowered to keep working to try and make a positive impact on this community. Also, it was very encouraging to see so many companies stepping up to promote and enable diversity within their companies and the robotics community. Thank you!

Sponsors

The ROSCon 2018 Diversity Program is made possible with support from the following sponsors:

amazon_logo

locus_logo

sick

If your organization is interested in getting involved in the Diversity Program, please get in contact.

We also thank the conference Platinum Sponsor, Erle, and Gold Sponsors: Amazon, Clearpath, Fetch Robotics, Google, Locus, ROBOTIS, Tier IV, Universal Robots.

How to apply

To apply, fill out this form by May 6 2018, describing how you are involved with ROS and the robotics community and what you hope to get out of attending ROSCon. Scholarships will be awarded based on a combination of need and impact. Every applicant will be notified of the outcome of their application.

For more information about ROSCon 2018, including the program, code of conduct, and childcare options, please see http://roscon.ros.org/2018

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by @dhood dhood on April 20, 2018 11:18 PM


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