September 22, 2014
New package: Augmented Reality System
From Hamdi Sahloul via ros-users@

Hi everyone!

I have been recently through a need for a reliable pose estimation system, in which ar_pose (http://wiki.ros.org/ar_pose) failed to stratify my needs as it depends on the very basic ARToolKit old library.
Moreover, I found aruco_ros (http://wiki.ros.org/aruco_ros) as a good package to begin with, but it was only using a single marker, or double markers. It does not have a visualization system as well.

So, I made my package..
In order to avoid occlusions, I used marker boards (you still have the ability to use a 1x1 marker board), and now it could detect virtually unlimited boards with a very good accuracy.
Nonetheless, it is able to handle many cameras at once, and finally display the result in the rviz (http://wiki.ros.org/rviz).

I would love if you discover things further yourself, so here is the link:


It would only cost you a camera and couple of papers to try, therefore, kindly be asked to try it and let me please know your impression and feedback which is highly appreciated!

by Tully Foote on September 22, 2014 06:05 PM

September 21, 2014
answers.ros.org: A Quick How-To
Below are 5 steps to getting the most out of ROS Answers, and hopefully giving the most back to the community in the process:

1. Don't be afraid to ask a question

The name of the site may be "ROS Answers", but there is no point in having answers if there are not questions. Often I find that people comment on old questions, or post answers to old questions, hoping to get help for a possibly related problem. Your comments will probably be missed by anyone who did not previously participate in that question/answer thread, and posting an answer with a question is just bad etiquette. If you have a question, open a new question!

2. But before you ask a question, check to see if someone has already asked and answered the exact same thing!

There are over 15,000 18000* questions on ROS Answers. There is a good chance that if you have a common problem, it has already been asked, and probably answered. The average time between posting a question and getting answer is probably several hours, however, if you spend just a few minutes searching the site you might find your answer immediately.

3. If you ask a question -- try to make sure other people will be able to find it some day by adding appropriate tags.

That search thingy in #2 depends on questions being properly tagged. Adding a few (useful) tags will both help get you an answer faster, as well as making sure that the next person with the same question can find your question and the answer to it. "ros" is probably not a useful tag, the name of the package, node, or command in question would be good tags. Including tags for the specific hardware you might be using could also be useful (for instance "kinect" or "pr2")

4. Close button is evil. Karma is good.

This is probably the most misunderstood aspect of ROS Answers. People frequently post a comment saying "thanks, that works" and then click the "close" button on the question instead of selecting an answer. Please don't do this! Instead, click the checkmark next to the question to select the answer to your question. You can only select the answer on questions that you asked, however, if you find an answer to someone else's question that helps you, you can give a little Karma by clicking the "up arrow". The answer to the right here has been upvoted 26 times -- it must be pretty good.

The answers website really depends on Karma. New users have restrictions (unable to post links, images, etc).  New users NEED Karma to become more effective users. Power users need Karma to be able to moderate the site, like retagging those questions where people didn't get the tags right.

5. Finally, make sure somebody can actually maybe answer your question.

Good answers require good questions. If you get an error in the console, certainly include that exact error into the question. A summary of the error, or "I got an error" are not substitutes for the actual error or traceback. Tells us exactly what commands you ran. Other things you probably want to include: what ROS version, operating system, and robot you are running -- and if you aren't running from up-to-date debs from the OSRF apt repo, you probably want to point out how you installed ROS.

* I started writing this post a few days after the 15000th question was posted. I finished writing it 3000 questions later....

by Michael Ferguson (noreply@blogger.com) on September 21, 2014 09:43 PM

September 17, 2014
Microsoft Kinect v2 Driver Released

Reposted from ROS.org/news

From Thiemo and Alexis via ros-users@

Dear ROS Community,

I am Thiemo from the Institute for Artificial Intelligence at the University of Bremen. I am currently a PhD Student under the supervision of Prof. Michael Beetz. I'm writing this together with Alexis Maldonado, another PhD Student at our lab, who has helped mainly with the hardware aspects.

To continue reading: http://www.ros.org/news/2014/09/microsoft-kinect-v2-driver-released.html

Note that the Kinect v2 was the topic of a presentation by Preben Hjornet from Blue Workforce during the recent ROS-Industrial Community Meeting, held at ROSCon on Sept. 13th. To listen to that presentation, go to time stamp 23:14 here: http://youtu.be/7gKnzVTEbVM

by Paul Hvass on September 17, 2014 06:48 PM

ROSCon 2014 comes to a close

Crossposted from www.osrfoundation.org

Thanks to everyone for another fantastic ROSCon! It was a fun event, filled with great presentations and discussions, plus many of those, "we've Internet-known each other for years, but are now meeting for the first time," moments. We'll post the videos and slides as soon as we can, linking them from the program page.

Here's the group at the end of the event (thanks to Chad Rockey for being our photographer):
ROSCON_GROUP_small

And here's one way to break down the demographics of the attendees, based on their type of affiliation:
roscon-2014-attendance-pie

We'd like to thank our generous sponsors, especially: QualcommClearpath Robotics,Rethink Robotics, and Cruise Automation.

by Tully Foote on September 17, 2014 01:19 AM

September 15, 2014
ROSCon 2014 comes to a close

Thanks to everyone for another fantastic ROSCon! It was a fun event, filled with great presentations and discussions, plus many of those, “we’ve Internet-known each other for years, but are now meeting for the first time,” moments. We’ll post the videos and slides as soon as we can, linking them from the program page.

Here’s the group at the end of the event (thanks to Chad Rockey for being our photographer):
ROSCON_GROUP_small

And here’s one way to break down the demographics of the attendees, based on their type of affiliation:
roscon-2014-attendance-pie

We’d like to thank our generous sponsors, especially: Qualcomm, Clearpath Robotics, Rethink Robotics, and Cruise Automation.

by Brian Gerkey on September 15, 2014 03:39 PM

Better Grasping with RightHand and ROS

Our friends at RightHand Robotics recently posted more information on how they worked with OSRF and ROS to develop their new ReFlex Hand. We’d like to highlight the fact that OSRF’s contribution to the project, which included the controller board electronics, its firmware, and the low-level host-side driver software, is all available under an open source license, in the reflex-ros-pkg repository.

Thanks to Morgan and Gabby for their great work on the project!

To learn more, dive into the code, take a look at the video below, or check out their blog post.

by Brian Gerkey on September 15, 2014 02:38 PM

Microsoft Kinect v2 Driver Released
From Thiemo and Alexis via ros-users@

Dear ROS Community,

I am Thiemo from the Institute for Artificial Intelligence at the University of Bremen. I am currently a PhD Student under the supervision of Prof. Michael Beetz. I'm writing this together with Alexis Maldonado, another PhD Student at our lab, who has helped mainly with the hardware aspects.

In the past few months I developed a toolkit for the Kinect v2 including: a ROS interface to the device (driver) using libfreenect2, an intrinsics/extrinsics calibration tool, an improved depth registration method using OpenCL, a lightweight pointcloud/images viewer based on the PCL visualizer and OpenCV.

The system has been developed for and tested in both ROS Hydro and Indigo (Ubuntu 12.04 and 14.04)

The driver has been improved to reach high performance, meaning to be able to process the sensor's information at full framerate (30Hz) on acceptable hardware (not only high-end machines). This was achieved through parallelization of the image pipeline. Care has also been taken to be able to transfer the complete data over compressed topics to other PCs (30Hz data uses approx. 40Mbytes/s on the network).

Specially interesting for other people with a PR2 robot: we have built a small mITX computer using an AMD A10-7850K processor, and a PicoPSU. It is installed as a backpack on our PR2, and a Kinect v2 on the head above the cameras. This 'backpack-PC' is necessary because the built-in computers on the PR2 don't support USB3 and they are quite loaded with their normal workload.

We are glad to announce the release of the software for ROS community, hoping it will be useful for others, specially people working in robotics research. Please see the following GitHub repository:

  https://github.com/code-iai/iai_kinect2

You will need a slightly patched version of libfreenect2, as indicated on the README. It is here:
  https://github.com/wiedemeyer/libfreenect2

Screenshots are also on the GitHub page.

We are looking forward to improvements and/or bug reports. Please use the GitHub tools for that.

Best regards,

Thiemo and Alexis

Institute for Artificial Intelligence
University of Bremen

by Tully Foote on September 15, 2014 05:26 AM

September 12, 2014
Open Source Robotics Foundation to Extend ROS Support to Qualcomm Snapdragon Processors

Roboticists Now Able to Incorporate System-On-A-Chip Capabilities in Robot Designs and Applications

September 12, 2014 — MOUNTAIN VIEW, CA – Open Source Robotics Foundation (OSRF) today announced plans to extend the capabilities of ROS to Qualcomm ® Snapdragon™ 600  processors, a product of Qualcomm Technologies, Inc. (QTI), a wholly-owned subsidiary of Qualcomm Incorporated. Today’s announcement is made in conjunction with ROSCon 2014, the annual ROS Developer Conference.  ROSCon runs from Sept. 12-13 in Chicago, IL.  More information on the event is at http://roscon.ros.org/2014/

Via this agreement, OSRF will create and subsequently support a ROS release for Qualcomm Snapdragon 600 processors for both the Linux and Android operating systems.  OSRF will test, refine, and fully integrate support for the ARM instruction set architecture into ROS development efforts.  Once complete, OSRF will perform ongoing maintenance to generally support ROS on Qualcomm Snapdragon 600 processors.

The benefit to the worldwide robotics community working on the lower-power ARM chips means that robots can be smaller, more efficient, and have a longer battery life.

“As adoption of ROS continues to increase, our developer community wants to incorporate the latest computing platforms,” says Brian Gerkey, CEO of OSRF.  “Given the intersection between robotics and mobile and embedded systems, we believe that offering Snapdragon’s SoC capabilities to our users will be a big hit.”

“Qualcomm Technologies is proud to join OSRF and the ROS community to create an official, supported release for Qualcomm Snapdragon 600 processors,” said Matt Grob, executive vice president and CTO, Qualcomm.  “We’re excited about the potential for future innovation and invention in the robotics community with the combination of ROS and Qualcomm Snapdragon processors.”

ROS (for “Robot Operating System”) is a collection of tools and libraries that simplify the task of creating and programming robotic platforms and applications.  ROS is overseen by OSRF, who make the OS freely available to any and all users via open source licenses.  Since its introduction in 2007, ROS has grown to become the de facto OS for roboticists all over the world.

Availability

ROS for Qualcomm Snapdragon 600 processors will be available on the Linux OS and is anticipated to be available in Q4 2014 and on the Android OS in the first half of 2015. For more information on Qualcomm Snapdragon processors, please visit, https://www.qualcomm.com/#/products/snapdragon

About The Open Source Robotics Foundation

The Open Source Robotics Foundation (OSRF) is an independent non-profit organization founded by members of the global robotics community. The mission of OSRF is to support the development, distribution, and adoption of open source software for use in robotics research, education, and product development.  More information on OSRF is available at www.osrfoundation.org or by following the company on Twitter @OSRFoundation

Media Contacts:

Tim Smith

Element Public Relations

tsmith@elementpr.com

415-350-3019

Qualcomm and Snapdragon are trademarks of Qualcomm Incorporated, registered in the United States and other countries.  All Qualcomm Incorporated trademarks are used with permission.

by Tully Foote on September 12, 2014 02:43 PM

September 10, 2014
ROSCon 2014 is coming fast!
ROSConChicago_Layered-200x300.png

We're looking forward this weekend to another great ROS event!

This will be the third ROSCon. To get into the mood take a look through the old sites for 2012 and 2013. They include links to the old programs as well as video recordings of the presentations available for viewing. 

This year we have a great program with 19 reviewed presentations on the use of ROS in environments ranging from deep mines to low earth orbit. 

As you prepare please think about topics for lightning talks or birds of a feather discussions. Everyone will have an opportunity to pitch both at the conference. For lightning talks you can prepare a few slides but don't try to do things which are too fancy. 

We look forward to seeing you there. There will be some construction on the Blue Line which may make travel from the airport a little harder. We have posted detail on the website

If you're attending you can add photos to the Google+ Event, or if you can't make it but want to see what's going on watch the event as well as hashtags #ROSCon2014 or #ROSCon

We'd like to thank our generous sponsors, especially: Qualcomm, Clearpath Robotics, Rethink Robotics, and Cruise Automation.

by Tully Foote on September 10, 2014 09:34 PM

September 09, 2014
New ROS package available for the Barrett Hand
From Román Navarro García via ros-users@

Hi Everyone,

We're pleased to announce a new package for the Barrett Hand BH8-28X

This package allows the control of the hand either in velocity or position, and reading the current state of the joints and the sensors (fingertip torque and tactile sensors).

The software includes packages with the model description and a graphical interface (rqt) to interact with the hand.

Links:

http://wiki.ros.org/Robots/BarrettHand -> Technical description
http://wiki.ros.org/barrett_hand -> ROS package description 


Groovy and Hydro are currently supported, Indigo soon.

If you are interested in verifying all these features of the hand, you can visit us from 14th until 18th of September in booth nº303 at IROS 2014.

Best regards,

by Tully Foote on September 09, 2014 09:46 PM

Virtual machines with ROS Indigo pre-installed
From Nootrix via ros-users@

Hi there,

Just wanted to let you know that we have issued two virtual machines with ROS Indigo Igloo pre-installed: one 64 bits and the other 32bits.
http://nootrix.com/2014/09/ros-indigo-virtual-machine/

Enjoy,
Eddy


by Tully Foote on September 09, 2014 04:15 AM

September 07, 2014
ROS running on ISS
Cross-posted from the ROS blog.

We have an update from NASA’s Johnson Space Center (JSC): ROS is now up and running on Robonaut 2 (R2) aboard the International Space Station (ISS).

R2-task-panel-thumb-480x270-921.jpg

ROS was delivered to ISS aboard a SpaceX rocket as part of a recent resupply mission that also included a set of robotic legs that will be attached to R2 soon.

NASA was able to upgrade the R2 torso earlier this month after on-orbit surgery to remove old processors and electronics and install new ones. On August 12, R2 powered up using ROS for the first time.

As we mentioned in a prior post, the R2 team at JSC has been using ROS for R2 development on Earth for the last couple of years. They combine ROS with OROCOS RTT to produce a flexible development environment with real-time capabilities.

Allison Thackston and Julia Badger from the R2 team will be addressing the audience at ROSCon on the unique challenges of deploying software in space systems. Their presentation, “ROS in Space,” will open the second day of the conference. ROSCon takes place on September 12 and 13 in Chicago, IL. For more information and registration details, visit the ROSCon website.

R2-stow-pose-thumb-480x318-936

by Brian Gerkey on September 07, 2014 05:33 PM

September 06, 2014
Intel NUC for ROS
This post has been a long time coming -- I think I promised it to several HBRC members at the July SIG...

I've frequently been asked "what computer do you use on your robots?", usually from someone looking at a variety of sub-$100 ARM boards. ARM processors have come a long way, but for a ROS computer, they are not the easiest choice. Austin Hendrix has done a lot of work to get a buildfarm up and running for ARM processors -- but there is still a long way to go and many things will not work "out-of-the-box".
So my choice? Well, it's not under $100, but it is a very fast, fairly low power machine (here, I define low-power in the sub-15W range). The latest generation of Intel NUC (Next Unit of Computing) modules offer quite a few options for small Intel Core-based computers. I'm using the 4th-generation i3-based D34010WYK. This offers quite a bit of compute power for ROS, especially when you consider that early TurtleBots ran on a single-core Atom. I've used 35W TDP i3 processors on a number of mobile manipulation problems and been able to run the OpenNI/OpenNI2-based drivers, the navigation stack and MoveIt! without much difficulty. If you're looking for a bit more processor, there is an i5-based version for $100 more.
Intel NUC (image from Intel NUC website)
These computers are sold as either a board (somewhat hard to find for sale) or as a kit which includes the case. Either option requires memory, hard drive and wifi card to be added. My setup is:
  • 8GB Crucial Ballistix Sport SODIMM. Whatever you choose, be sure it is 1.35V RAM -- the newer NUC models work ONLY with 1.35V RAM (many modules are 1.5V).
  • 120GB Crucial mSATA SSD. Intel offers a larger case version of the NUC that fits a standard 2.5" drive, but the smaller versions only take an mSATA drive.
  • Intel 7260 Wireless-AC Card. This card will work best with Ubuntu 14.04, older versions will need an updated kernel (at least 3.13) to get working drivers. No need for antennas as they are already in the case.
These boards take 12-24V DC input, but are probably most efficient at 19V. I'm powering mine off a 12V battery connected to a Pololu 5A Step-Up Regulator that is configured to output the desired 19V. My batteries will never get even close to 19V even when fully charged, and so the regulator should not have any issues.
I would recommend installing Ubuntu 14.04 and using ROS Indigo for these machines. If you want to use an older Ubuntu distro, you should definitely make sure your wifi card is compatible, because the Ethernet port will not work with the drivers present on the 12.04 installer and you will have to connect to ubuntu.com to update somehow. Another alternative is to look for a NUC based on the 3rd-generation Intel Core processors, but these might be hard to locate.

by Michael Ferguson (noreply@blogger.com) on September 06, 2014 10:45 PM

September 05, 2014
Cartesian Path Planner Plug-In for MoveIt!

Dear ROS-I Community,

My name is Risto Kojcev, a joint PhD student between the BioRobotics Institute at Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna and MicroBio Robotics Institute at the Italian Institute of Technology, in Pisa Italy.

This year I was participating in the Google Summer of Code (GSoC) directed by the Open Source Robotics Foundation (OSRF) and ROS-Industrial (ROS-I) Consortium. The title of my project was Cartesian Path Planner Plug-In for MoveIt.

In this blog post I would like to share the vision behind the GSoC project and its usefulness in the real robotic applications.

Technical Details of the Plug-In

The project aim was to develop a user friendly Cartesian Path Planner Plug-In for MoveIt!. In the current version of the project, the user can simultaneously interact with a Qt Widget and the RViz environment to define and set Cartesian Way-Points, which can then be passed to the Cartesian Planner of the MoveIt package and executed both on a simulated and real robot. [Cartesian waypoints can also be loaded externally from a yaml file.]

For the User Interaction in the RViz environment the Interactive Marker package was used. The plug-in offers two types of Interactive Markers. The first one is called Interaction Marker and is used to add the second type of Interactive Marker, the actual Cartesian Way-Points. The Cartesian Way-Points can be moved around freely in the RViz environment, and a menu that offers additional components for removing the Way from the Cartesian Plan and more detailed 6DOF control is available for each Way-Point. The color of the Way-Points lets the user know if a certain Way-Point is within the range of the Inverse Kinematics (IK) solution for the loaded robot model. In the case when the point is within the range of the IK Solution the color of the way-point is blue and yellow otherwise.

The user can also interact with the Cartesian Planner through a Qt Widget. In this widget all the Way-Points are displayed, offering additional details about each Way-Point Pose, which can be edited and adjusted by the user. Furthermore, the user can perform the same operations as in the RViz environment: adding a new Way-Point or removing it. The Way-Points can be saved to a file and the Plug-in also offers the user to load a previously saved way-points file.

The Cartesian Planner part of this Plug-in offers the user a means to adjust the parameters of the Cartesian Planner and execute a Cartesian Path set from the previously added Way-Points.

More detailed tutorials and description of the Plug-in can be found on the moveit_cartesian_plan_plugin wiki page. For the source code of the project, reporting bugs and further development suggestions, please visit the github repository.

Applications and Future Development

The design goals behind the Cartesian Plug-in was to create a simple and user friendly environment, which targets larger groups of users, from ROS beginners to more ROS experienced users. It is envisioned to find its applications in a lot of industrial applications, for example welding, painting or performing more complex actions. This Plug-in is a good starting point for future development of other applications, not just in the industrial robotics area, where Cartesian path planning is useful. For example to even further automate the creation of Way-Points an external perception system can be used which would generate Cartesian Way-Points and then the user can review the Cartesian Path, correct it and execute it, or even save it if necessary.

I would like to conclude this blog post by sharing my gratitude towards all the ROS-I community members and my mentor Shaun Edwards, who shared their suggestions during the project development. I am very happy that I had the chance to participate in this awesome program and this was a great experience for me and most of all I had lot of fun working on this project. I hope that this project would find its place in many applications and it would be useful for lot of users.

by Paul Hvass on September 05, 2014 08:00 PM

September 03, 2014
2014 ROS Metrics Report Available
The 2014 edition of the ROS Metrics Report is now posted at: http://download.ros.org/downloads/metrics/metrics-report-2014-07.pdf

This is the 4th version of the ROS Metrics report. All are versions are available at: http://wiki.ros.org/Metrics 

The ROS community has grown in almost every metric. The one exception is that the number of wiki pages has dropped. This is due to a concerted cleanup effort earlier this year which removed a lot of empty pages with little to no content. 

The other metric which warrants note is the large growth in the number of unique IPs per month, up to 49,153 from last years sampling of 11,078.  And the total downloads of packages more than doubled to 3,570,374 downloads. 

And all of these numbers do not count the any statistics for mirrors either private or public

If you have a moment we recommend you take a look. There are many interesting statistics such as ROS users by country and the top 40 most downloaded packages. 

Related to this look for more information on the ROS ecosystem from William Curran's talk next week at ROSCon 2014.  Event Program


by Tully Foote on September 03, 2014 07:57 PM

September 02, 2014
ROS running on ISS

We have an update from NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC): ROS is now up and running on Robonaut 2 (R2) aboard the International Space Station (ISS).

R2-task-panel.jpg

ROS was delivered to ISS aboard a SpaceX rocket as part of a recent resupply mission that also included a set of robotic legs that will be attached to R2 soon.

NASA was able to upgrade the R2 torso earlier this month after on-orbit surgery to remove old processors and electronics and install new ones. On August 12, R2 powered up using ROS for the first time.

As we mentioned in a prior post, the R2 team at JSC has been using ROS for R2 development on Earth for the last couple of years. They combine ROS with OROCOS RTT to produce a flexible development environment with real-time capabilities.

Allison Thackston and Julia Badger from the R2 team will be addressing the audience at ROSCon on the unique challenges of deploying software in space systems. Their presentation, "ROS in Space," will open the second day of the conference. ROSCon takes place on September 12 and 13 in Chicago, IL. For more information and registration details, visit the ROSCon website.

R2-stow-pose.jpg

by Brian Gerkey on September 02, 2014 03:12 PM

September 01, 2014
Multi robot Teleoperation in Gazebo



Finally, different type of robots in Gazebo are under control with Concert. See teleoperating multiple robots in Gazebo with concert teleop app


by Jihoon Lee (noreply@blogger.com) on September 01, 2014 05:06 AM

August 28, 2014
Breaking the Physics of ROS
Just as the universe has its rules written down in physics, ROS has a few of its own too. If there was a likely candidate, it would be the rule:

There can be only one node per process

Though not obvious...it is possible to break this golden rule of the ROS universe with a little bit of ecto:


ecto_ros.init(sys.argv, "foo", anonymous=False) # c++ cell initialisation
rospy.init_node("foo") # rospy initialisation for this ectoscript

$ [ WARN] [1409210302.714603865]: Shutdown request received.
$ [ WARN] [1409210302.714694875]: Reason given for shutdown: [new node registered with same name]

And providing a unique name for the ecto script (e.g. 'bar') then resolves the uniqueness problem and presto, you have two nodes. I suspect if we were to create universes, we would be hard pressed to be as infallible as the creator of ours!

by Daniel Stonier (noreply@blogger.com) on August 28, 2014 08:01 AM

August 27, 2014
ROS Dependency Analysis Graph
From Ben Arvey via @ros-users

Hello, my name is Ben Arvey and I've been developing a set of analysis tools for ROS under the direction of Dr. Bill Smart. Our lab is giving a talk at ROSCon concerning our research, of which this is one aspect.


I'm looking for some preliminary feedback from developers. Any information about what you need in an analysis tool would be very helpful!

Here's the web app (Chrome works best):
http://http404error.github.io/roseco/graph.html?id=ros.json

Here's a page with some basic documentation info and suggestions for feedback:

by Tully Foote on August 27, 2014 08:18 PM

August 26, 2014
TurtleBot arm is back on indigo!
TurtleBot: every day a bit more indigo! We have updated most of the turtlebot_arm stack to work with Indigo and MoveIt!. It’s released as version 0.3.x (while fuerte version was 0.2.x). The big missing parts are the turtlebot_arm_interactive_markers that are not really needed now because you can do the same with the RViz moveit plugin, and the turtlebot_block_manipulation, that relays on deprecated stuff. Instead, we added a simple pick and place demo to show the arm operating with MoveIt! Hopefully, we'll be able to add more sophisticated demos (like a MoveIt! version of the block manipulation demo).... as soon as we find time to do so!

We also updated the documentation and tutorials, but pretty sure there're many errors and fuerte-like staff that doesn't hold anymore, so please, please, please let us know (or better correct yourself!) any mistakes you find.

Enjoy it!


by jorge (noreply@blogger.com) on August 26, 2014 09:06 AM

August 25, 2014
Experimental Indigo binaries for ARM
From Austin Hendrix via ros-users@

I'm pleased to announce that I have experimental binary builds of ROS available for ARM and ready for wider testing.

I have builds of the ros-core and ros-base metapackages, along with PCL and the navigation stack.

Notably missing are the OpenNi drivers, rviz, moveit, and many other packages. I'm planning to work on them, but they're not currently available.

Installation instructions are available at http://wiki.ros.org/indigo/Installation/UbuntuARM , and the full build status is available at http://packages.namniart.com/repos/status/indigo.html (green packages are built, red packages failed to build).

Just to clarify, these are builds of ROS Indigo targeted at Ubuntu Trusty (14.04) running on armhf processors

by Tully Foote on August 25, 2014 08:29 PM

August 20, 2014
ROS Art
from the Shadow Robot Company

Over at Queen Mary University London, they run a postgraduate course in Media and Arts Technology, and one of the students there, Ed Burton, created this innovative performance using ROS and the RoNeX.

This is still a work in progress but here's a  teaser of Ed's work, using ROS for a beautiful project:



And here is a quick peak at his RoNeX installation:



by Ugo Cupcic on August 20, 2014 11:54 PM

Lasers, anyone?

We're happy to announce that SICK has donated hardware to OSRF for the ROS community to use in testing and development. We're now the proud owners of one each of the following laser scanners: TiM551, LMS111, and LMS511.

tim551.jpg lms111.jpg lms5xx.jpg

This generous donation was motivated by SICK's longstanding commitment to robotics, combined with their desire to see first-class support for their sensors in ROS. The LMS series is best known for providing reliable LiDAR data in tough conditions including the DARPA Urban Challenge and Boston Dynamics' LS3 AlphaDog. The TiM is a smaller version designed for great performance with low power consumption in indoor or outdoor environments.

The sensors are available for loan to members of the ROS community who want to use them for testing and development, and especially for improvement of the ROS drivers and associated tools. If you'd like to borrow one of these devices to try it out in your project, please let us know: info@osrfoundation.org

Thank you to our friends at SICK, and we look forward to even more robotics applications that are enabled by SICK sensors and ROS software!

by Tully Foote on August 20, 2014 05:18 PM

August 18, 2014
STDR Simulator v0.2 released
From Manos Tsardoulias 

Dear all,

We are happy to announce that the current version of STDR Simulator is 0.2! The changes compared to the v0.1.3 follow:

  • Several bugs were fixed
  • Code was refactored
  • Lidar resources were added
  • Added support of:
    • RFID tags and Readers
    • Thermal sources / sensors
    • CO2 sources / sensors
    • Sound sources / sensors

Special thanks to Sergey Alexandrov and Scott K Logan for code contributions.

Our future plans:
  • Make the sensor measurements more realistic
  • Add simulated battery in robots
  • Detection of robots footprint via other robots' distance sensors
  • Add a simple physics engine
It would be excellent if any of you would like to contribute either by code developmentissue reporting or features request!

Best,
The STDR team.

by Tully Foote on August 18, 2014 04:10 PM

August 15, 2014
Autonomous Vehicle Engineer and Intern Positions at Auro Robotics


from Jit Ray Chowdhury via ros-users@


Autonomous Vehicle Engineers and Interns


Job Summary:


Software and System Development for driverless car modules. 

You will be enganged in development, integration and testing of perception, motion planning and control systems involved in an autonomous vehicle. 

We are looking for roboticists and other passionate to join our journey in taking robotics from labs to masses. 

Detailed Job Description  

  1.  Autonomous Vehicle Software Engineer @ http://goo.gl/lALUHu 
  2.  Autonomous Vehicle Associate Engineer @ http://goo.gl/YNZ4nS
  3.  Autonomous Vehicle Intern @ http://goo.gl/3XMncG 

Skills in need:

  • Good Programming skills in C++ 
  • Experience with LINUX 
  • Familiarity with ROS  and autonomous robot concepts is a plus
  • Proven Expertise in one of the fields is a plus: Image Processing, SLAM(Localization and Mapping), Controls, Path Planning. 

About us

We are Auro Robotics, a high-tech robotics startup building the first driverless car from India. The venture is a spin-off from a research group of IIT Kharagpur working on autonomous vehicles since the past 4 years. We are presently helping some of the leading automobile companies in building autonomous driving systems and ADAS for their cars.

Team Previous Experience: CMU, Qualcomm 

Here is a video of our self driving car demo.

Our profile @ https://angel.co/auro-robotics 


How to Apply

Send your resume at contact@aurobots.com or give us a call at +91-9002712425 (Srinivas) , +91-8588865823 (Nalin) , +91-9143299599 (Jit)

 

 

 Limited Positions, so hurry up!!


by Ugo Cupcic on August 15, 2014 08:41 PM


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