February 18, 2019
Visualize ULog files (PX4) with PlotJuggler

@facontidavide wrote:

Since version 2.1.3, you can also visualize ULog files in PlotJuggler.

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by @facontidavide Davide Faconti on February 18, 2019 05:28 PM

Introducing Worldview

@lentinjoseph wrote:

Webviz is a web-based application for playback and visualization of ROS bag files. This repository also contains some libraries that can be used independently to build web-based visualization tools.

https://cruise-automation.github.io/webviz/worldview

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by @lentinjoseph Lentin Joseph on February 18, 2019 05:47 AM

February 15, 2019
Patch release and new packages for ROS 2 Crystal Clemmys 2019-02-14

@nuclearsandwich wrote:

That date’s not a typo! The release actually did happen yesterday but an inconvenient plane flight prevented me from uploading the release binaries and finishing up the notes.

But without further ado the release is out!

Some changes that I’d like to highlight:

  • rqt_gui_cpp now supported on Ubuntu Xenial
  • Releases were made that resolve the uncrustify errors in some packages (ros2/ros2)
  • The ros_workspace package now sets a COLCON_PREFIX_PATH hook so colcon setup files source the root ROS workspace ros2/ros2#653

For everything included in the patch release check out the tracking issue.

The tracking issue for the next patch release is now open for those who wish to follow it.

Package Updates for crystal

Added Packages [5]:

Updated Packages [87]:

  • ros-crystal-example-interfaces: 0.6.1-0 -> 0.6.2-0
  • ros-crystal-example-interfaces-dbgsym: 0.6.1-0 -> 0.6.2-0
  • ros-crystal-examples-rclcpp-minimal-action-client: 0.6.1-0 -> 0.6.2-0
  • ros-crystal-examples-rclcpp-minimal-action-client-dbgsym: 0.6.1-0 -> 0.6.2-0
  • ros-crystal-examples-rclcpp-minimal-action-server: 0.6.1-0 -> 0.6.2-0
  • ros-crystal-examples-rclcpp-minimal-action-server-dbgsym: 0.6.1-0 -> 0.6.2-0
  • ros-crystal-examples-rclcpp-minimal-client: 0.6.1-0 -> 0.6.2-0
  • ros-crystal-examples-rclcpp-minimal-client-dbgsym: 0.6.1-0 -> 0.6.2-0
  • ros-crystal-examples-rclcpp-minimal-composition: 0.6.1-0 -> 0.6.2-0
  • ros-crystal-examples-rclcpp-minimal-composition-dbgsym: 0.6.1-0 -> 0.6.2-0
  • ros-crystal-examples-rclcpp-minimal-publisher: 0.6.1-0 -> 0.6.2-0
  • ros-crystal-examples-rclcpp-minimal-publisher-dbgsym: 0.6.1-0 -> 0.6.2-0
  • ros-crystal-examples-rclcpp-minimal-service: 0.6.1-0 -> 0.6.2-0
  • ros-crystal-examples-rclcpp-minimal-service-dbgsym: 0.6.1-0 -> 0.6.2-0
  • ros-crystal-examples-rclcpp-minimal-subscriber: 0.6.1-0 -> 0.6.2-0
  • ros-crystal-examples-rclcpp-minimal-subscriber-dbgsym: 0.6.1-0 -> 0.6.2-0
  • ros-crystal-examples-rclcpp-minimal-timer: 0.6.1-0 -> 0.6.2-0
  • ros-crystal-examples-rclcpp-minimal-timer-dbgsym: 0.6.1-0 -> 0.6.2-0
  • ros-crystal-examples-rclpy-executors: 0.6.1-0 -> 0.6.2-0
  • ros-crystal-examples-rclpy-minimal-client: 0.6.1-0 -> 0.6.2-0
  • ros-crystal-examples-rclpy-minimal-publisher: 0.6.1-0 -> 0.6.2-0
  • ros-crystal-examples-rclpy-minimal-service: 0.6.1-0 -> 0.6.2-0
  • ros-crystal-examples-rclpy-minimal-subscriber: 0.6.1-0 -> 0.6.2-0
  • ros-crystal-fmi-adapter: 0.1.2-0 -> 0.1.3-0
  • ros-crystal-fmi-adapter-dbgsym: 0.1.2-0 -> 0.1.3-0
  • ros-crystal-fmi-adapter-examples: 0.1.2-0 -> 0.1.3-0
  • ros-crystal-qt-dotgraph: 1.0.3-0 -> 1.0.4-0
  • ros-crystal-qt-gui: 1.0.3-0 -> 1.0.4-0
  • ros-crystal-qt-gui-app: 1.0.3-0 -> 1.0.4-0
  • ros-crystal-qt-gui-core: 1.0.3-0 -> 1.0.4-0
  • ros-crystal-qt-gui-cpp: 1.0.3-0 -> 1.0.4-0
  • ros-crystal-qt-gui-cpp-dbgsym: 1.0.3-0 -> 1.0.4-0
  • ros-crystal-qt-gui-py-common: 1.0.3-0 -> 1.0.4-0
  • ros-crystal-rcl: 0.6.4-0 -> 0.6.5-0
  • ros-crystal-rcl-action: 0.6.4-0 -> 0.6.5-0
  • ros-crystal-rcl-action-dbgsym: 0.6.4-0 -> 0.6.5-0
  • ros-crystal-rcl-dbgsym: 0.6.4-0 -> 0.6.5-0
  • ros-crystal-rcl-lifecycle: 0.6.4-0 -> 0.6.5-0
  • ros-crystal-rcl-lifecycle-dbgsym: 0.6.4-0 -> 0.6.5-0
  • ros-crystal-rcl-yaml-param-parser: 0.6.4-0 -> 0.6.5-0
  • ros-crystal-rcl-yaml-param-parser-dbgsym: 0.6.4-0 -> 0.6.5-0
  • ros-crystal-rclcpp: 0.6.2-0 -> 0.6.3-0
  • ros-crystal-rclcpp-action: 0.6.2-0 -> 0.6.3-0
  • ros-crystal-rclcpp-action-dbgsym: 0.6.2-0 -> 0.6.3-0
  • ros-crystal-rclcpp-dbgsym: 0.6.2-0 -> 0.6.3-0
  • ros-crystal-rclcpp-lifecycle: 0.6.2-0 -> 0.6.3-0
  • ros-crystal-rclcpp-lifecycle-dbgsym: 0.6.2-0 -> 0.6.3-0
  • ros-crystal-rclpy: 0.6.1-0 -> 0.6.2-0
  • ros-crystal-rclpy-dbgsym: 0.6.1-0 -> 0.6.2-0
  • ros-crystal-rcutils: 0.6.1-0 -> 0.6.2-0
  • ros-crystal-rcutils-dbgsym: 0.6.1-0 -> 0.6.2-0
  • ros-crystal-rmw-opensplice-cpp: 0.6.2-0 -> 0.6.3-0
  • ros-crystal-rmw-opensplice-cpp-dbgsym: 0.6.2-0 -> 0.6.3-0
  • ros-crystal-ros-workspace: 0.6.0-1 -> 0.6.1-0
  • ros-crystal-ros2cli: 0.6.2-0 -> 0.6.3-0
  • ros-crystal-ros2lifecycle: 0.6.2-0 -> 0.6.3-0
  • ros-crystal-ros2msg: 0.6.2-0 -> 0.6.3-0
  • ros-crystal-ros2multicast: 0.6.2-0 -> 0.6.3-0
  • ros-crystal-ros2node: 0.6.2-0 -> 0.6.3-0
  • ros-crystal-ros2param: 0.6.2-0 -> 0.6.3-0
  • ros-crystal-ros2pkg: 0.6.2-0 -> 0.6.3-0
  • ros-crystal-ros2run: 0.6.2-0 -> 0.6.3-0
  • ros-crystal-ros2service: 0.6.2-0 -> 0.6.3-0
  • ros-crystal-ros2srv: 0.6.2-0 -> 0.6.3-0
  • ros-crystal-ros2topic: 0.6.2-0 -> 0.6.3-0
  • ros-crystal-rosidl-actions: 0.6.2-0 -> 0.6.3-0
  • ros-crystal-rosidl-adapter: 0.6.2-0 -> 0.6.3-0
  • ros-crystal-rosidl-cmake: 0.6.2-0 -> 0.6.3-0
  • ros-crystal-rosidl-generator-c: 0.6.2-0 -> 0.6.3-0
  • ros-crystal-rosidl-generator-c-dbgsym: 0.6.2-0 -> 0.6.3-0
  • ros-crystal-rosidl-generator-cpp: 0.6.2-0 -> 0.6.3-0
  • ros-crystal-rosidl-parser: 0.6.2-0 -> 0.6.3-0
  • ros-crystal-rosidl-typesupport-interface: 0.6.2-0 -> 0.6.3-0
  • ros-crystal-rosidl-typesupport-introspection-c: 0.6.2-0 -> 0.6.3-0
  • ros-crystal-rosidl-typesupport-introspection-c-dbgsym: 0.6.2-0 -> 0.6.3-0
  • ros-crystal-rosidl-typesupport-introspection-cpp: 0.6.2-0 -> 0.6.3-0
  • ros-crystal-rosidl-typesupport-introspection-cpp-dbgsym: 0.6.2-0 -> 0.6.3-0
  • ros-crystal-rqt: 1.0.1-0 -> 1.0.2-0
  • ros-crystal-rqt-gui: 1.0.1-0 -> 1.0.2-0
  • ros-crystal-rqt-gui-cpp: 1.0.1-0 -> 1.0.2-0
  • ros-crystal-rqt-gui-cpp-dbgsym: 1.0.1-0 -> 1.0.2-0
  • ros-crystal-rqt-gui-py: 1.0.1-0 -> 1.0.2-0
  • ros-crystal-rqt-py-common: 1.0.1-0 -> 1.0.2-0
  • ros-crystal-rqt-py-common-dbgsym: 1.0.1-0 -> 1.0.2-0
  • ros-crystal-sros2: 0.6.1-0 -> 0.6.2-0
  • ros-crystal-teleop-twist-joy: 2.1.0-0 -> 2.1.1-0
  • ros-crystal-teleop-twist-joy-dbgsym: 2.1.0-0 -> 2.1.1-0

Removed Packages [2]:

  • ros-crystal-console-bridge
  • ros-crystal-console-bridge-dbgsym

:sweat_smile: I don’t have an answer yet for why these packages were here in the first place, between Bouncy and Crystal we moved to a console_bridge_vendor package.

Thanks to all ROS maintainers who make packages available to the ROS community. The above list of packages was made possible by the work of the following maintainers:

  • AWS B9 Team
  • Anup Pemmaiah
  • Chris Lalancette
  • Daniel Stonier
  • Dirk Thomas
  • Dorian Scholz
  • Jacob Perron
  • Karsten Knese
  • Michael Carroll
  • Ralph Lange
  • Shane Loretz
  • Steven! Ragnarök
  • William Woodall

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by @nuclearsandwich Steven! Ragnarök on February 15, 2019 12:15 PM

February 14, 2019
ROSCon 2019 Sponsors

@tfoote wrote:

We’re thrilled to announce our first group of sponsors for ROSCon 2019!

Platinum: Amazon

Gold: Acutronic Robotics, Apex.AI, iRobot, ROBOTIS, Tier IV, and Toyota Research Institute

Silver: Tony Robotics and ROS Industrial Consortium

Bronze: The Construct, Intel, Ouster, PickNik, Renesas, RT Corporation, Scale.ai, and Yujin Robot

Friend: AutoWare

In addition Acutronic Robotics, Apex.AI, and AutoWare are also supporting the Diversity Scholarship Program.

We’re still looking for new sponsors. Please check the prospectus to learn about our sponsorship opportunities and feel free to contact the organizing committee (roscon-2019-oc@osrfoundation.org) with any questions. The exclusive sponsorship levels are starting to sell out, so it’s best to act soon.

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by @tfoote Tully Foote on February 14, 2019 10:17 PM

February 13, 2019
PlotJuggler 2.X: Better integration with RViz and custom data transform

@facontidavide wrote:

Hi,

I am pleased to announce the release of PlotJuggler 2 (current version 2.1.2).

PlotJuggler 2 is a big step forward and it introduces some exciting features:

  • Better republishing of ROS messages allows a more robust interaction with RViz. It is similar to “rosbag play” but much faster, and visual.

  • User can create on the fly simple mathematical formulas to manipulate their data; potential applications are:

    • scale conversion (radians to degrees?)
    • filtering (low pass filters?)
    • or more complex transformations (quaternions to RPY?)

Furthermore, many bugs were fixed and the UI has been improved.

Take a look at the new video (a little more than 3 minutes):

image

If you want to know more about PlotJuggler, you may want to check this recent podcast.

Since you are here (wait for it)…

Maybe Discourse is not the best place to post blatantly promotional information but, on the other hand, it is also the best way to reach the entire robotics community, including companies and industrial users.

I hope no one will be offended :slight_smile:

… Consider supporting PlotJuggler!

PlotJuggler is a software created to manage, find and visualize large amount of data, in the order of tens of thousands of time series. It can be easily extended through plugins to support any data format.

If you use PlotJuggler in your company, consider sponsoring its further development; you can contact me to create additional features that suit your specific needs.

One of my goals is to port PlotJuggler to ROS2, and I am currently looking for companies that want to support economically this effort.

Find out more

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by @facontidavide Davide Faconti on February 13, 2019 05:37 PM

February 12, 2019
[Beta Test] DYNAMIXEL Wizard 2.0

@Matt_Song wrote:

Happy belated New Year!

We hope you are having a great start of the year.

Here’s a good news for all of you especially advanced users and Linux users.
All new DYNAMIXEL Wizard 2.0 is about to be released, so we’d like you to try it and tell us what you think.
The DYNAMIXEL Wizard 2.0 supports Linux and Windows, and going to support OS X as well in the near future.

DYNAMIXEL Wizard 2.0 comes with various advanced features that will allow users to get the most out of DYNAMIXEL.

Below is the list of advanced features “currently” implemented in the software.

  1. Graph plotting feature : User can select Control Table items to plot data on the graph
  2. Packet Monitoring & Generation : User can easily generate packets and log TX/RX packets to analyze
  3. DYNAMIXEL Diagnosis : Enhanced diagnosis helps to figure out the problem of DYNAMIXEL.
  4. Enhanced Firmware Updates : Multiple DYNAMIXEL with different ID can be updated at the same time.
  5. Multi Baudrates, Ports are supported.

Please refer to the below eManual for more information.

Software can be downloaded at below download link.

Please feel free to report any bugs or issues.
Thanks!

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by @Matt_Song Matt Song on February 12, 2019 07:26 AM

February 11, 2019
New packages for Melodic 2019-02-11

@clalancette wrote:

We’re happy to announce the next update for ROS Melodic. We have 42 new packages as well as 38 updated packages.

As always, thanks to all of the maintainers and contributors who help make these updates possible!

Full details are below.

Package Updates for melodic

Added Packages [42]:

Updated Packages [38]:

Removed Packages [0]:

Thanks to all ROS maintainers who make packages available to the ROS community. The above list of packages was made possible by the work of the following maintainers:

  • AutonomouStuff Software Development Team
  • Bence Magyar
  • Daniel Stonier
  • David Uhm
  • Davide Faconti
  • Felix Ruess
  • Isaac I.Y. Saito
  • Jack O’Quin
  • Jihoon Lee
  • Josh Whitley
  • Kei Okada
  • Konstantin Schauwecker
  • Marc Alban
  • Marcus Liebhardt
  • Mark Moll
  • Martin Pecka
  • Matthew Tesch
  • Mike Purvis
  • Monika Florek-Jasinska
  • Nicholas Zatkovich
  • Nick Hawes
  • Paul Bovbel
  • Pyo
  • Russell Toris
  • Timo Röhling
  • Vladimir Ermakov
  • Wolfgang Merkt

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by @clalancette Chris on February 11, 2019 01:26 PM

February 09, 2019
An instantaneous chat platform for the ROS community

@ruffsl wrote:

Continuing the discussion from Design process of ROS 2:

After reading through an engaging thread over in the Design Process of ROS-2 category, I wanted to follow up on a particular point made by @wjwwood by re-opening a general discussion for it:

:+1: ^ :100:! I totally agree that adding community channel for ephemeral communication could really help wrt. many of the issues raised in the related thread. To help push this forward, I’d like to kick start with some callbacks to past discussions, current solutions, and some of my own suggestions. Please feel free to add references you think I might have missed.


Past Discussions

http://lists.ros.org/pipermail/ros-users/2016-March/069890.html


Current Solutions

IRC

Old school, but kind of dead with few modern features or popularity

http://irc.lc/freenode/ros

Slack

Been there done that, proprietary and limited free tear

https://rosorg.slack.com

Discord

Feature rich, support for audio, polished multi-platform

Rocket Chat

Open Source, hosting like Discourse, video conferencing

Gitter

Developer orientated and integratable (from GITLAB)


Suggestions

I’d like Discord or Rocket Chat, as I appreciate voice/video chat rooms given I’m quite a typo typist, but Gitter seem most applicable given our community software focus. Before reading more up on the compassion between the three, I didn’t realize that Rocket Chat also supported screen sharing (via jitsi), which would also be helpful for presenting or demonstrations.

I’ve used Discord before with another software project (albeit a much smaller example community) and it liked using it, given the UI clients worked well both from an installed application or web browser. Given its gaming origins, having features like push-to-talk or voice-activation made sitting in an open-ended VOP enabled chatroom for prolonged discussions quite natural and low barrier. However, the interface is designed more around the individual, like a social media platform; though I haven’t administrated an org on Discord, I’d imagine the community management infrastructure might not be as scailable as with Gitter or Rocket Chat.

I’ve also used Rocket Chat when interacting with the Hyperledger Community. Although not as polished as Discord, Rocket Chat it is open source, and has similar hosting model like Discourse. However, Gitter’s integration with the existing platforms we already use seem like the dead ringer. To get a better feel than just is mono landing page, you can check out the gitter readme docs here.

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by @ruffsl ruffsl on February 09, 2019 10:23 AM

February 08, 2019
ROS Industrial Conference #RICEU2018 (Session 4)

From public funding opportunities to the latest technologies in software and system integration, the combination of robotics and IT to hardware and application highlights: ROS-Industrial Conference 2018 offered a varied and top-class programme to more than 150 attendees. For the sixth time already, Fraunhofer IPA organized a ROS event in Stuttgart to present the status of ROS in Europe and to discuss existing challenges.

This is the fourth instalment of a series of four consecutive blog posts, presenting content and discussions according to the sessions:

  1. EU ROS Updates (watch all talks in this YouTube playlist)
  2. Software and system integration (watch all talks in this YouTube playlist)
  3. Robotics meets IT (watch all but 1 talks in this YouTube playlist)
  4. Hardware and application highlights (watch all but 1 talks in this YouTube playlist)

Day 3 - Session “Hardware and Application Highlights“

Georg Heppner (FZI) and Fabian Fürst (Opel) At ROS-Industrial Conference 2018

Georg Heppner (FZI) and Fabian Fürst (Opel) At ROS-Industrial Conference 2018

In the fourth and final session of the ROS-Industrial Conference 2018, the focus was on hardware developments and applications implemented in industrial use cases. Fabian Fuerst, Opel, and Georg Heppner, FZI, delivered the session keynote. They presented their solution for flexible automotive assembly with industrial robotic co-workers. The application was developed as part of the EU EuRoC project. In this four-year competition, more than 100 participants initially worked on new robotic solutions for the manufacturing industry. In the course of several evaluation rounds, the team from FZI, Opel and MRK Systeme GmbH was able to assert itself successfully to the end.

During the course of the project, the FZI developed an automated robotic assembly for flexible polymer door sealings on car doors. The sealing is a closed ring, which has to be fixed with up to 40 plastic pins depending on the model, an ergonomically unfavourable task that could not be automated until now. The developed assembly cell is very flexible and open, so that the robot can be used without a safety fence. For this purpose, an external force control was developed that can be used easily and directly also for numerous other robots as a package of ROS-Industrial. The CAD-2-PATH software is used for the simple path creation for the robot. This enables a quick adjustment to other door models and does not require any expert knowledge. This is important because there are different door models and sealing types and the automation solution must be adaptable accordingly and quickly. It is notable that the application received positive assessment from Opel with regards to safety, typically a sensitive topic when applying novel tools such as ROS in automotive applications.

Paul Evans (Southwest Research Institute / ROS-Industrial North America) at ROS-Industrial Conference 2018

Paul Evans (Southwest Research Institute / ROS-Industrial North America) at ROS-Industrial Conference 2018

The presentation by Paul Evans, Southwest Research Institute and ROS-Industrial Consortium North Americas, provided current information on the activities of the North America Consortium such as strategic initiatives, trainings, and networking activities. These also focus on voices of members and include activities for the strategy alignment, for more robustness and flexibility and agility. There are also collaborations with OEMs who support ROS or develop their own drivers. At the ROS-I Consortium Americas Annual Meeting 2018, different applications were presented, for example an order batch picking robot from Bastian Solutions and a robotic system for agile aerospace applications like sanding, blending, drilling etc. for the U.S. Air Force. A last highlight that Evans presented was the ROS-I collaboration with BMW and Microsoft. While RIC-North Americas supported the evaluation of simulation environments that included physics engines the RIC-EU partners provided additional navigation support and training for mobile robots at the BMW plant to support assembly logistics. The solution is deployed on Microsoft Azure.

Mobile robots was also the topic of the lecture by Karsten Bohlmann, E&K Automation. He presented solutions for ROS on AGVs and perception-driven load handling and PLC interfaces.

Arun Damodaran (Denso) at ROS-Inudstrial Conference 2018

Arun Damodaran (Denso) at ROS-Inudstrial Conference 2018

Denso Robotics Europe was present at the conference with Arun Damodaran, who talked about Cobotta, the ROS-enabled collaborative robot. This is a six-axis arm with a reach of 342 mm, a repeatability of 0,05 mm and a payload of 500 g. It has an inherently safe design, meets all requirements for safety-standards corresponding to the ISO norms and is compliant thanks to safety-rated monitored function. Another advantage is its easy set-up and use. This is realized by the usage of the robot programming software drag&bot. Developed by the spin-off of the same name of Fraunhofer IPA, the software enables the programming of robots like Cobotta with the drag and drop principle. No expert knowledge is needed. The software is also based on ROS, works independently from any robot manufacturer and can be reused as well as shared via the cloud. Denso has been engaged in the development of ROS components and packages (simulation, control, path creating) for its robots since 2012 and now uses an open platform for controlling the Cobotta.

Felipe Garcia Lopez from Fraunhofer IPA focused on a networked navigation solution for mobile robots in industrial applications. This is particularly useful for changing environments in which mobile robots should independently select free routes. Fraunhofer IPA and Bär Automation, for example, have implemented a navigation solution for agile assembly in automobile production. With this, AGVs can locate themselves robustly and precisely based on sensor data, even without special infrastructure. This makes it possible to easily adapt existing paths or integrate new ones even after commissioning. Since the software's sensor fusion module can process data from almost any sensor, very customer-specific solutions can be implemented.

Another example is the networked navigation for smart transport robots at BMW. Here as well there were few static landmarks, a lot of dynamic obstacles and sparse sensor data in large-scale environments. A process reliability of more than 99% had to be fulfilled. The presented navigation as well as the vehicle control are ROS-based. At the end of the presentation, an outlook into Cloud-Navigation was given: Mobile robots and stationary sensors are then connected using a Cloud-based IT-infrastructure. The environment is cooperatively modelled and SLAM is used. This enables also solutions for “Navigation-as-a-service” meaning map updates and cooperative path planning for each robot. With Cloud-Navigation, local hardware and computational resources can be reduced and the quality and flexibility of the overall navigation system is enhanced.

Thomas Pilz (Pilz GmbH & Co. KG) at ROS-Inudstrial Conference 2018

Thomas Pilz (Pilz GmbH & Co. KG) at ROS-Inudstrial Conference 2018

ROS as an appropriate solution both inside and outside of industry – this was the starting point for Thomas Pilz, Managing Partner of family owned company Pilz. Combined with his own career and his experience with the first service robots, lightweight robots and robots outside production environments, he first described how the question of safety standards has changed in recent years. The definition and understanding of a robot is currently in the process of changing significantly. For Pilz, systems such as the Care-O-bot® from Fraunhofer IPA are the new upcoming robots. They operate outside of cages, are mobile and users can easily interact with them and program them using ROS. He sees ROS as a success factor for service robots because of its modular design, its standardization, additional flexibility through programming languages and its networked, interoperable system in line with Industry 4.0.

Robots that are to interact with humans are also changing the required safety technology at Pilz in the long term because all previous infrastructure such as fences is no longer required. This led Pilz to develop its own robot arm with appropriate safety technology. They use ROS modules developed by Pilz because they are breaking new ground with the development of the robot arm and can thus fall back on a broad programming knowledge base. They had nothing to lose with the new product. However, in order for them to meet the safety standards, the modules must no longer be changed in an uncontrolled manner. To improve this, Pilz recommends changing the safety standards so that they are also amenable to Open Source. Finally yet importantly, he believes that the term robot manufacturer will also change, because this role will increasingly be fulfilled by those who implement the application and no longer by those who produce the robot or components for it. In the lively discussion after the presentation, Pilz once again emphasized two arguments in favour of ROS. First: When it is said that ROS is tedious, one should bear in mind that the development of proprietary software is also difficult. Second: ROS is tedious, but fun. Pilz also sees ROS as a decisive factor for employee satisfaction and as an argument for staying with Pilz.

At the end of the conference, Gaël Blondel from the Eclipse Foundation presented the Eclipse Foundation and its Robotics Activities. The platform with around 280 corporate members, half of them from Europe, provides a mature, scalable, and business-friendly environment for open source software collaboration and innovation. Eclipse is vendor-neutral and offers a business-friendly ecosystem based on extensible platforms. They offer their own IP management and licensing but also accept other business-friendly licenses. Several working groups are particularly engaged in development processes for robotics. One example for a robotic project managed with Eclipse is the EU project RobMoSys that aims to coordinate the whole community’s best and consorted efforts to realise a step-change towards a European ecosystem for open and sustainable industry-grade software development.

At the end of the event, Mirko Bordignon and Thilo Zimmermann thanked the participants for another great and record breaking ROS-Industrial Conference. Presentations and videos of the event have been made available on the event website: https://rosindustrial.org/events/2018/12/11/ros-industrial-conference-2018

by Thilo Zimmermann on February 08, 2019 03:37 PM

February 04, 2019
New Packages for Kinetic 2019-02-04

@tfoote wrote:

We’re happy to announce 6 new packages and 69 updated packages for ROS Kinetic. The full details are below.

Thank you to all the maintainers and contributors who have helped make these packages available to the community. Your efforts are greatly appreciated!

Package Updates for kinetic

Added Packages [6]:

Updated Packages [69]:

Removed Packages [0]:

Thanks to all ROS maintainers who make packages available to the ROS community. The above list of packages was made possible by the work of the following maintainers:

  • Alexander Gutenkunst
  • Angel Soriano
  • AutonomouStuff Software Development Team
  • Bence Magyar
  • Daniel Stonier
  • Davide Faconti
  • Florian Polster
  • Jack O’Quin
  • John Hsu
  • Jonathan Hechtbauer
  • Jose Luis Rivero
  • Josh Whitley
  • Kei Okada
  • Marc Alban
  • Martin Pecka
  • Matthew Tesch
  • Michael Lehning
  • Mike Purvis
  • Niklas Wettengel
  • Paul Bovbel
  • Pilz GmbH and Co. KG
  • Pyo
  • Russell Toris
  • Timo Röhling
  • Wolfgang Merkt
  • Yannick Roberts
  • Yuki Furuta
  • ipa-lth
  • raphael
  • shi

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by @tfoote Tully Foote on February 04, 2019 08:19 PM

New Package for Indigo 2019-02-04

@tfoote wrote:

We’re happy to announce 6 new package and 24 updated packages for Indigo. Full details are below. Thank you to all the maintainers and contributors who helped make these packages available to the community!

Package Updates for indigo

Added Packages [6]:

Updated Packages [24]:

Removed Packages [0]:

Thanks to all ROS maintainers who make packages available to the ROS community. The above list of packages was made possible by the work of the following maintainers:

  • Davide Faconti
  • Jack O’Quin
  • Josh Whitley
  • Marc Alban
  • Martin Pecka
  • Mike Purvis
  • Paul Bovbel
  • Thach Do
  • Timo Röhling

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by @tfoote Tully Foote on February 04, 2019 08:14 PM

ROSCon 2019: Call for Sponsors

We're now soliciting sponsors for ROSCon 2019 in Macau!

Please check the prospectus to learn about this year's benefit packages. If you're interested in sponsoring or have any questions about the sponsor program, contact the organizing committee.

We hope to see you at ROSCon 2019!

-- Your friendly neighborhood ROSCon 2019 Organizing Committee

by Tully Foote on February 04, 2019 06:16 PM

[Autoware] Call for submissions: Autoware Workshop at IV 2019, Paris

@Sumanth-Nirmal wrote:

Autoware (https://www.autoware.org/) is the worlds first “All-in-One” open-source software for autonomous driving technology.

We are organizing a workshop on Autoware at IV 2019 on June 9 in Paris and hereby invite for submissions. For more details see: https://www.autoware.org/iv2019

We look forward to your participation.


Sumanth Nirmal,
Apex.AI, Inc.

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by @Sumanth-Nirmal on February 04, 2019 05:31 PM

ROS TSC Meeting Notes 2019-01-17

@gerkey wrote:

ROS 2 TSC Meeting Minutes: January 17th, 2019

These notes are being published a bit later than usual due to travel schedules. We’ll aim to be more timely with publishing these notes following future meetings.

  • Attendees:
    • Allison (TRI)
    • Bob S (TARDEC)
    • Brian G. (Open Robotics)
    • Brian S. (LGE)
    • Dejan (Apex.AI)
    • Dirk (Open Robotics)
    • Doug (Amazon)
    • Karsten (Bosch)
    • Lou (Microsoft)
    • Louise (Open Robotics)
    • Matt D (TARDEC)
    • Matt H (Intel)
    • Pyo (ROBOTIS)
    • Seonman (LGE)
    • Tully (Open Robotics)
  • (5 mins) [update] ROS copyright status (Brian)
    • Pending questions (type of mark, description, and industry categories) answered; waiting on legal feedback.
  • (5 mins) [update] DCO bot status (Dirk)
  • (5 mins) [update] Elevator pitch on ROS 2 (Brian)
    • From Matt H.: ROS2 benefits key talking points - I had requested we create a short list of talking points we can all quickly refer to when asked what the benefits of ROS2 are over ROS. I know there was a presentation on this at ROSCon a few years back but it’s not really easy to point people to that. I think a “30-second elevator pitch” is more like what I’m looking for. I believe you said you would work on that?
      • No update; Brian to generate
  • (5 mins) [discussion] New WGs (Matt H.)
    • Is there any interest from TSC members for a Real-time WG and a Safety WG? If so, do we have anyone who would lead either of those WGs?
      • DP: Apex has been working on this. Can share their existing internal research.
      • MH: Can be a forum for collaboration,
      • KK: Interest from Bosch side
      • MD: Large group interested in realtime from government sources
      • Dejan is willing to lead a realtime group with Apex, Bosch and ROS-M participants.
    • Updates from existing WGs
      • Security
        • DF: Ray Cole from AWS is current lead; need to check on whether to continue as-is.
      • Navigation
        • MH: on hiatus since Crystal; just getting restarted
  • (10 mins) [discussion] New members (Brian)
    • Feedback on Process
      • KK: It would be nice to have some metrics for contributions measurements in the applications
      • What is in the ROS Core and subject to evaluation? It’s specifically vague to not box ourselves in.
      • DT: Should past contributions be required versus an intent to make contributions?
      • Feedback to applicants to encourage continuing engagement for future reevaluation.
    • Ratified adding 2 new members: Acutronic Robotics, eProsima
  • (20 mins) [update & discussion] Debrief on Crystal release (Dirk)
    • What got in (high level view)
      • C++ client library
        • Actions
      • Python client library
        • Parameters
        • Clock, time, rate, timers
      • Launch
        • Life cycle nodes
        • Nesting of launch files
        • Passing parameters
      • Rosbag
        • Record and playback of binary messages
        • Command line tool
      • Feature packages
        • Image transport
        • Gazebo ROS packages
        • Navigation2
        • rqt
      • index.ros.org
    • What slipped (high level view)
      • Actions in Python (might be released in a patch release)
      • IDL pipeline (-> Dashing)
      • Launching components (-> Dashing)
      • Rosbag playback of ROS 1 bag files
      • Buildfarm improvements (almost complete, will be rolled out independently)
      • Audit Memory Management (some parts have landed, but still ongoing)
      • Logging improvements, e.g. log to /rosout topic (might be released in a patch release)
      • SROS2
    • Syncs / patch releases
      • Syncs will happen roughly every two weeks (if there are new / updated packages), announced via Discourse (as for any ROS distro) Coordinated on Discourse
      • Patch releases (meaning releases of core packages maintained by Open Robotics) happen on demand, will be available with the next sync
    • Process changes that are already planned for future distributions
      • Schedule high-impact and/or invasive changes early in the cycle
      • Set freeze dates earlier in the cycle and being strict about them
        • Allowing time for the community to support testing
      • Plan resources for increased review needs before the freeze dates
      • Shorter turnaround time on tickets in general
    • Take feedback from the group on other changes
  • (10 mins) [proposal] Dashing release plan (Dirk)
    • Release date: Fri. May 31st 2019
    • Dates prior to the release
      • Mon. Apr 8th: First releases of core packages available (alpha)
        • Testing can happen from now on (some features might not have landed yet)
      • Thu. May 2nd: API freeze for core packages
      • Mon. May 6th: Updated releases of core packages available (beta)
        • Additional testing of the latest features
      • Thu. May 16th: Code freeze
        • Only bug fix releases should be made after this point
        • New packages can be released independently
      • Mon. May 20th: Updated releases of core packages available (release candidate)
      • Wed. May 29th: Freeze rosdistro
        • No PRs for Dashing on the rosdistro repo will be merged (reopens after the release announcement)
    • Support period and LTS status
      • Dashing is the first ROS 2 LTS, with 2 years’ support (through May 2021)
    • Tentative plan for future releases
      • E-turtle release: Nov 22nd 2019
        • Sandwiched between ROSCon (Oct 31-Nov 1) / IROS (Nov 3-8) and US Thanksgiving (Nov 28)
        • Not an LTS, 1 year support
      • F-turtle release (same time as ROS 1 Noetic): May 2020
        • LTS, likely longer support period (e.g., 3+ years)
        • The goal is to target Ubuntu 20.04
    • Supported platforms (update to REP 2000) proposal:
      • Tier 1:
        • Ubuntu 18.04 (Bionic), amd64 and ARMv8
          • Same as for Crystal
        • macOS 10.14 (Mojave)
          • Upgrade from 10.12 (Sierra)
        • Windows 10
          • Same as for Crystal
      • Tier 2:
        • Discontinue from-source support for Ubuntu 16.04 (Xenial)
      • Tier 3:
        • Debian 9 (Stretch)
          • Same as for Crystal
          • Option: if Debian 10 (Buster) is available in time, upgrade
      • No change on RMW implementations
      • Minimum dependency versions will increase with the removal of Ubuntu 16.04 (Xenial) (and eventually Debian 9 (Stretch))
      • Request for information about Armhf vs arm64 vs amd64 usage:
  • (15 mins) Roadmap for Dashing (Dirk)
    • Open Robotics planned items (high level view):
      • Launch
        • Launching components, passing arguments to components, CMake API to create shared libraries of components
        • Enable testing, replacing the legacy API
        • XML(/YAML) front-end for launch
      • IDL pipeline
      • Efficient image pipeline, address shortcomings in intra-process comms
      • Parameter
        • Declaration of ranges, rqt-based UI
        • Read-only parameters
      • Improve memory management
      • Improve performance and reliability
      • Port to ROS 2
        • rosbridge_suite
        • Support migration of MoveIt
      • CI for simulation-based testing of navigation
      • Buildfarm infrastructure
        • Roll out incremental CI jobs
        • RPM packages
      • Need to add:
        • improved docs and testing (to support LTS label)
        • Update navigation2 to use native ROS 2 components (actions, dynamic params)
    • Solicit additions from TSC members
      • (Pyo) support cartographer_ros package. There’s been a lot of changes on v1.0.0, It does not work with the current ROS 2 Crystal version. so we are porting to ROS 2. We are preparing the real mobile robot (TurtleBot3 and mobile platform of LG CLOi) to run actually SLAM and navigation in the ROS 2 Dashing version. https://github.com/ROBOTIS-GIT/cartographer_ros/tree/crystal
      • (Dejan) next generation of integration test framework
      • (Lou) Windows builds, CI, Simulation and Testing on Azure DevOps
        • ROS 1 / ROS 2 coexistence, ros1_bridge
      • (Karsten) considering diagnostics
      • (Karsten) ros_control (pending MoveIt! port progress)
      • (Doug) input to come via tickets
      • (Dejan) funding eProsima on performance improvements in FastRTPS
      • (Brian Shin) improving ROS 2 OpenEmbedded support, working with ROBOTIS for TB3
  • Looking forward for next meeting. Opinions on timing past cycle has been 6 weeks?
    • A little faster at 4 weeks would be good for keeping things going. +1 Lou, Doug, Dejan
      • Gerkey will do that and schedule out through dashing release

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by @gerkey gerkey on February 04, 2019 01:40 AM

ROSCon 2019: Call for Sponsors

@gerkey wrote:

We’re now soliciting sponsors for ROSCon 2019 in Macau!

Please check the prospectus to learn about this year’s benefit packages. If you’re interested in sponsoring or have any questions about the sponsor program, contact the organizing committee.

We hope to see you at ROSCon 2019!

– Your friendly neighborhood ROSCon 2019 Organizing Committee

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by @gerkey gerkey on February 04, 2019 01:08 AM

February 02, 2019
Postdoc positions in the Robotics and Internet of Things Lab at Prince Sultan University

@Anis_Koubaa wrote:

Please disseminate to interested people

The Robotics and Internet of Things Lab at Prince Sultan University is looking for postdoc candidates in the following five areas:

  • Internet of Things

  • Unmanned Aerial Systems

  • Deep Learning

  • Self-driving and smart vehicles

  • Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS)

We offer competitive salaries based on the research record of the candidate.

The postdoc could be promoted to an assistant professor position at the University upon showing a good performance during the postdoc.

For more details about working conditions, benefits, key performance indicators, requirements, and topics of interest, please refer to:

http://www.riotu-lab.org/postdoc.php

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by @Anis_Koubaa Anis Koubaa on February 02, 2019 08:11 AM

February 01, 2019
Announcing ROS snapshot repositories

@nuclearsandwich wrote:

There is an established workflow for new releases within a ROS distribution. As improvements are made, changes are periodically synced into the main ROS repositories and those changes are announced via Discourse. While we strive to avoid regressions and compatibility breaks in new syncs they can occur, causing disruption in your workflow if it happens in packages you rely on. Even without regressions syncs can affect users who install new packages without upgrading installed packages between syncs. Or your build system may rely on storing and retrieving packages with exact version numbers which become unavailable after being replaced by new versions during a sync.

With the aim of improving overall reproducibility in the ROS community we’ve set up a new apt repository host that will provide persistent hosting for snapshots of each sync for active ROS distros. The snapshots will be taken just after every sync of the ROS stable repository and will be available for at least six months from the sync date.

For teams that want to more closely control when they update to the latest sync, these snapshot repositories will make it easier to access the packaged binaries from earlier syncs.

Snapshot repositories for the following ROS distributions are available now and will remain available for at least 6 months from their sync date.

  • ROS Indigo: Ubuntu Trusty ARMv7 (armhf), Ubuntu Trusty i386, Ubuntu Trusty AMD64 (x86_64)

  • ROS Kinetic: Ubuntu Xenial ARMv7 (armhf), Ubuntu Xenial ARMv8 (arm64, aarch64), Ubuntu Xenial i386, Ubuntu Xenial AMD64 (x86_64)

  • ROS Melodic: Ubuntu Bionic ARMv7 (armhf), Ubuntu Bionic ARMv8 (arm64, aarch64), Ubuntu Bionic AMD64 (x86_64)

  • ROS 2 Ardent: Ubuntu Xenial ARMv8 (arm64, aarch64), Ubuntu Xenial AMD64 (x86_64)

  • ROS 2 Bouncy: Ubuntu Bionic ARMv8 (arm64, aarch64), Ubuntu Bionic AMD64 (x86_64)

  • ROS 2 Crystal: Ubuntu Bionic ARMv8 (arm64, aarch64), Ubuntu Bionic AMD64 (x86_64)

How to set it up

See the instructions in the ROS wiki http://wiki.ros.org/SnapshotRepository

What to expect

Snapshots do not receive bug fixes or security updates so it is still a good idea to follow ROS releases and upgrade periodically.

ABI compatibility between snapshots is not tested or guaranteed so when switching a system to a new snapshot updating all ROS packages is recommended.

Should you use the snapshot repositories?

We think most ROS developers should continue to use ROS from the primary repositories.

The snapshot repository is still in preview so waiting for us to stabilize it before using it on production robots is prudent.

But if your build and deploy process involves bundling ROS packages before transferring a comprehensive artifact, like a Docker or OCI container image, then the snapshot repository is worth checking out today. And after you do, reply to this thread with any feedback or to let us know you found it useful.

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by @nuclearsandwich Steven! Ragnarök on February 01, 2019 10:57 PM

Announcing rosbash_params - give your bash scripts a rospy-like feel

@peci1 wrote:

New package rosbash_params has been released into I, K, L and M: http://wiki.ros.org/rosbash_params

This Bash env-hook adds a “node-like” interface to your code written in Bash. The main thing it adds is ROS-like command-line parameter parsing (_param:=value), so that you can easily call the Bash script from a launch file like this:

pkg/launch/test.launch:
...
<node name="test" pkg="pkg" type="my_bash_script.sh">
    <param name="par" value="test" />
</node>
...

pkg/src/my_bash_script.sh:
rosbash_init_node "node_name" "$@"  # parse the command line arguments
rosbash_param param_var "par" 
echo "Got parameter 'par' with value ${param_var}"

Please note this is not a full-featured client library for Bash - it just adds some convenience for people writing Bash scripts ros ROS packages. So even though there’s rosbash_init_node call, it does not start up a real ROS node - but it reads the private parameters from the same namespace a real node would.

The package can work both with ROS param server and without it. It can even be used without a roscore running.

One of the ideas behind this package was to allow easier writing of ROS nodes which can be used by downstream packages without knowing which language they are written in. Currently, even C++ and Python nodes process parameters differently when called from commandline. Put a thumb-up to the issue if you also want language-agnostic ROS nodes :slight_smile:

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by @peci1 Martin Pecka on February 01, 2019 08:25 PM

ROS Industrial Conference #RICEU2018 (Session 3)

From public funding opportunities to the latest technologies in software and system integration, the combination of robotics and IT to hardware and application highlights: ROS-Industrial Conference 2018 offered a varied and top-class programme to more than 150 attendees. For the sixth time already, Fraunhofer IPA organized a ROS event in Stuttgart to present the status of ROS in Europe and to discuss existing challenges.

This is the third instalment of a series of four consecutive blog posts, presenting content and discussions according to the sessions:

  1. EU ROS Updates (watch all talks in this YouTube playlist)
  2. Software and system integration (watch all talks in this YouTube playlist)
  3. Robotics meets IT (watch all but 1 talks in this YouTube playlist)
  4. Hardware and application highlights

Day 2 - Session “Robotics meets IT“

Henrik Christensen (UC San Diego) at ROS-Industrial Conference 2018

Henrik Christensen (UC San Diego) at ROS-Industrial Conference 2018

The third session testified the growing importance of ROS to support the development and deployment of robotic solutions from companies outside the traditional boundaries of this industry. Predominantly software players such as Amazon or Google now offer platforms leveraging ROS, which they described during the session.

Henrik Christensen, from UC San Diego and ROBO Global, gave a very inspiring keynote speech on why robotics is increasingly using cloud technologies and how it will benefit from them. He outlined three factors as current business drivers for this development: the increasing demand for flexibility in production, the aging world population and the associated increasing demand for service robots at home, and finally the trend that more and more people live in cities, posing great challenges for logistics. All robot solutions must be cost-efficient and robust at the same time in order to offer the required reliability. If computer performance always had to be on board, the hardware would often be inadequate (e.g. for slim service robots for private use) or the costs for suitable hardware would be too high (e.g. for autonomous cars).

Technologies from or in the cloud can be a solution for this. Christensen presented the value of these ecosystems using extensive market examples and explained how they differ in agility and size. Many successful companies, primarily in the USA and Asia, have shifted their business model from owning things or technologies to orchestrating them and offering services. For robotics, ROS 2.0 can be a decisive door opener here, offering the standardization required for platforms.

Milad Geravand (Bosch Engineering) at ROS-Industrial Conference 2018

Milad Geravand (Bosch Engineering) at ROS-Industrial Conference 2018

The next presentations in the session took up these and similar ideas and presented existing solutions. Milad Geravand from Bosch Engineering presented a modular software platform for mobile systems such as cleaning, off-road and intralogistics robots and how they can be developed more efficiently. In his experience, the difficulties in the development process are similar in many companies: The applications are usually very different, the software is becoming increasingly complex, a structured deployment and integration process is lacking. ROS is not yet ready for the products and the leap from prototype to series production is still too big. With the software platform presented, which is based on ROS, Bosch would therefore like to address precisely these challenges and enable uses cases to be developed quickly and reliably.

Eric Jensen, working for Canonical, the company well known for the Ubuntu Linux distribution, presented the advantages of Ubuntu Core especially with regard to security that is still an open issue for ROS. The mentioned advantages are: A minimal, transactional Ubuntu for appliances, safe and reliable updates with tests and rollbacks, app containment and isolation with managed access to resources, a unique development environment familiar for Linux developers and the possibility to easily create app stores for all devices needed. Furthermore, Ubuntu has one of the biggest developer communities in the world and is backed by Canonical itself, an important plus for security. Last but not least, the system offers automatic security warnings for the „snaps“, the special package format in Ubuntu, system audits through package verification and compliance management – all are important features for an improved security.

Roger Barga (Amazon AWS) at ROS-Inudstrial Conference 2018

Roger Barga (Amazon AWS) at ROS-Inudstrial Conference 2018

Only a few weeks before the ROS-Industrial-Conference, Amazon, for a long time far more than an e-commerce store, had introduced its new platform AWS RoboMaker, which caused a sensation beyond the ROS-Community. Roger Barga, General Manager at AWS Robotics & Autonomous Services, kindly presented this novel development at the conference. Amazon's commitment to robotics is based on discussions with around 100 companies, during which they were able to identify two main problems in robot development. On the one hand, this is a very high demand for automation solutions with simultaneous difficulties with ROS such as security or performance. On the other hand, the development process is usually very inefficient.

The RoboMaker platform addresses these requirements with its four main components. It offers a browser-based development environment, which in turn has integrated cloud extensions for ROS as well as a simulation environment. The cloud extensions range from machine learning tools to monitoring and analytics. Concrete capabilities for robots include speech recognition and output, video streaming, image and video analysis, as well as logging and monitoring with Amazon CloudWatch. The simulation environment allows thousands of simulations to be run in parallel. The fourth component is fleet management, so that robot applications can be deployed over the air. The presentation ended with a short introduction to the learning environment of RoboMaker, with which Amazon applies reinforcement learning to robots. The robots then learn according to the principle "trial and error". By merging all errors within a fleet in the cloud, a large knowledge base is quickly available and not every single robot has to make a specific error to learn from, but it benefits from the learning experiences of other robots in the fleet.

The topic of robotics in the cloud was also the focus of the lecture by Christian Henkel from Fraunhofer IPA. In his experience, the deployment of ROS-based applications on distributed systems such as mobile robots is still too great a challenge, which he would like to address in his work with docker containers (dockeROS). With his solution, it is possible to simply run ros nodes in docker containers on remote robots.

Martin Hägele (Fraunhofer IPA) moderates a panel discussion with Henrik Christensen (UC San Diego), Oliver Goetz (SAP), Michael Grupp (magazino), Niels Jul Jacobsen (MiR) and Damon Kohler (Google).

Martin Hägele (Fraunhofer IPA) moderates a panel discussion with Henrik Christensen (UC San Diego), Oliver Goetz (SAP), Michael Grupp (magazino), Niels Jul Jacobsen (MiR) and Damon Kohler (Google).

With Damon Kohler, Google Robotics and its recently presented cloud solution were also represented at the conference. In his introductory remarks, Kohler mentioned several challenges related to cloud robotics, including security, connectivity and latency, and distributing work, e.g. partitioning problems. In contrast, he sees advantages such as scalability, collaborative perception and behaviour and a robust change management and monitoring. He sees cloud robotics as a further development of the well-known principle "sense -> plan -> act" around the component "sense -> share -> plan -> act" and as an interplay of edge and cloud processing.

The aims of cloud robotics are an increased launch cadence, more data and more users and a better resource utilization. This shall be reached by infrastructure as a service, design for small and decoupled components as well as tools for automation and orchestration. The ROS nodes correspond to the Google micro-services: They are stateless and replicable, which means horizontally scalable. The container orchestration engine Kubernetes helps to deploy and release these micro-services. Several mature and robust logging and monitoring tools like Stackdriver help managing the system. The heart of the whole is the Cloud Robotics Core, being available from beginning of 2019 that enables to integrate Kubernetes on robots. Overall, Google’s vision is an open platform and a thriving ecosystem where integrators, developers, hardware developers and operators can collaborate with customers efficiently.

The second day of the conference ended with a panel discussion. The panellists were Henrik Christensen (UC San Diego), Oliver Goetz (SAP), Michael Grupp (magazino), Niels Jul Jacobsen (MiR) and Damon Kohler (Google). Moderated by Martin Hägele (Fraunhofer IPA), they summed up some advantages from their respective company perspectives, but also existing challenges of ROS and the role of open source software and robotics for their corporate strategy.

by Thilo Zimmermann on February 01, 2019 10:48 AM

Announcing new packages for TurtleBot3 in ROS2 (including Cartographer and Navigation2)

@routiful wrote:

Hi guys :slight_smile:

We are happy to announce new packages for TurtleBot3!!
The packages includes Cartographer(@clalancette) and Navigation2(@mkhansen)

Now, you can launch those packages using simple commands in ROS2 Crystal Clemmys with TurtleBot3.
If you already have TurtleBot3, you could try teleoperation, SLAM and navigation through ROS2 frameworks after you setup for ROS2.
If you don’t have TurtleBot3, you could load TurtleBot3 into Gazebo simulator and launch everything I said.

This release only support Burger yet, but we are going to update that packages to support Waffle Pi after few days later.

[Github repo]

[Issue page]

[E-Manual]

Cartographer

Navigation2

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by @routiful Taehoon Lim(Darby) on February 01, 2019 07:40 AM

New packages for Crystal 2019-01-31

@nuclearsandwich wrote:

I’m happy to announce the latest updates for ROS 2 Crystal Clemmys.

Package Updates for crystal

Added Packages [7]:

Updated Packages [8]:

  • ros-crystal-librealsense2: 2.16.5-1 -> 2.16.5-2
  • ros-crystal-librealsense2-dbgsym: 2.16.5-1 -> 2.16.5-2
  • ros-crystal-object-analytics-msgs: 0.5.2-0 -> 0.5.3-0
  • ros-crystal-object-analytics-msgs-dbgsym: 0.5.2-0 -> 0.5.3-0
  • ros-crystal-object-analytics-node: 0.5.2-0 -> 0.5.3-0
  • ros-crystal-object-analytics-node-dbgsym: 0.5.2-0 -> 0.5.3-0
  • ros-crystal-object-analytics-rviz: 0.5.2-0 -> 0.5.3-0
  • ros-crystal-object-analytics-rviz-dbgsym: 0.5.2-0 -> 0.5.3-0

Removed Packages [0]:

Thanks to all ROS maintainers who make packages available to the ROS community. The above list of packages was made possible by the work of the following maintainers:

  • AWS RoboMaker
  • Bence Magyar
  • Chris Ye
  • Daniel Stonier
  • Ralph Lange
  • Sergey Dorodnicov

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by @nuclearsandwich Steven! Ragnarök on February 01, 2019 12:16 AM

New packages for Bouncy 2019-01-31

@nuclearsandwich wrote:

I’m happy to announce Bouncy’s first sync of 2019. Future syncs will happen in tandem with Crystal syncs as needed.

Package Updates for bouncy

Added Packages [5]:

Updated Packages [0]:

Removed Packages [0]:


Thanks to all ROS maintainers who make packages available to the ROS community. The above list of packages was made possible by the work of the following maintainers:

  • Bence Magyar
  • Daniel Stonier

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by @nuclearsandwich Steven! Ragnarök on February 01, 2019 12:13 AM

January 28, 2019
Rosdep and EOL distros

@dirk-thomas wrote:

TL;DR if you are using an EOL ROS distribution you will from now on need to pass the option --include-eol-distros to rosdep update.


The tool rosdep uses .yaml files which define the mapping of rosdep keys to system packages as well as enumerate all ROS packages for each ROS distribution.

Until recently when calling rosdep update to fetch the latest information the tool was fetching a .yaml file for every ROS distribution since groovy. Since the number of ROS distributions is continuously increasing the time it takes to fetch these files was increasing to. With the roll out of REP 153 we finally have meta information about each ROS distribution and know which ones are end-of-life. With that knowledge newer versions of rosdep (as of 0.14.0) won’t by default fetch information for EOLed ROS distributions anymore.

I you happen to still use an EOL ROS distro and want to keep using rosdep you can invoke it with the new option --include-eol-distros to keep fetching information about all ROS distributions.

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by @dirk-thomas Dirk Thomas on January 28, 2019 06:24 PM

January 25, 2019
New ROS 2 TSC members: Acutronic Robotics and eProsima

@gerkey wrote:

I’m happy to announce that we’re welcoming two new members to the ROS 2 TSC:

  • Victor Mayoral Vilches, representing Acutronic Robotics
  • Jaime Martin Losa, representing eProsima

We look forward to seeing continued significant contributions to ROS 2 from Victor, Jaime, and their teams.

In addition, Amazon’s representative on the TSC will now be Rutvik Hora.

Welcome to all of them!

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by @gerkey gerkey on January 25, 2019 07:28 PM

January 24, 2019
New packages for Melodic 2019-01-24

@clalancette wrote:

We’re happy to announce the next update for ROS Melodic. We have 29 new packages as well as 69 updated packages.

As always, thanks to all of the maintainers and contributors who help make these updates possible!

Full details are below.

Package Updates for melodic

Added Packages [29]:

Updated Packages [69]:

Removed Packages [0]:

Thanks to all ROS maintainers who make packages available to the ROS community. The above list of packages was made possible by the work of the following maintainers:

  • Alexander Sherikov
  • Alexander Tiderko
  • Alexander W. Winkler
  • Atsushi Watanabe
  • Bence Magyar
  • Christian Rauch
  • Ed Venator
  • Enrique Fernandez
  • Felix Ruess
  • Hilario Tomé
  • Kei Okada
  • Kevin Hallenbeck
  • Kris Kozak
  • Lennart Puck
  • Marc Alban
  • Martin Günther
  • Max Schwarz
  • Michal Staniaszek
  • Michele Colledanchise
  • Micho Radovnikovich
  • Nicholas Zatkovich
  • P. J. Reed
  • Paul Bovbel
  • Pyo
  • Sam Pfeiffer
  • Victor Lopez
  • Victor López
  • Vladimir Ermakov
  • Vladimir Ivan
  • Wolfgang Merkt
  • Yiming Yang
  • Zahi Kakish
  • davidfernandez

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by @clalancette Chris on January 24, 2019 01:00 PM


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